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 Post subject: Wiring Telephone Socket
PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:43 pm 
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Hi - hopefully somebody will be able to help me. Apologies for the length of the post.

I've recently moved into a new property and wanted to get the phone connected.

There was a BT socket in the living room and an extension socket (the DIY type) in the bedroom. Whilst decorating we removed the extension as it looked messy , but left some of the wiring along the skirting bd.

However when I called BT to get them to connect the line the BT socket did't work. I removed the socket and attached it to the end of the extension line and got a dial tone. The extension line and the line from the BT socket seem to meet behind a storage heater attached to the wall which I cannot get behind.

To resolve the problem I moved the BT socket from its original position and wired it in to the extension line where it runs on the skirting bd.

All seems to be working well, but I have a few questions.

1) Should I be moving the BT socket, or should I be calling them out to do that?

Also does anybody have any idea what might be going on behind my storage heater for the extension line to work but the main socket not?

The final thing is that the BT socket that I moved doesn't seem to bear any resemblance to the one's I've seen on this site. The wires where not attached to any numbered terminals on the back. Instead the blue one was attached to a terminal marked "A" and the orange one to a terminal marked "B". There is a spare terminal marked E, and the other 2 wires where not attached at all (no bare wire showing though).

Obviously I have attached the BT socket to my extension cable in an identical way but just wanted to check with someone who knows if I am causing a major danger!!!

Many thanks in advance


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:49 pm 
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No danger and you shouldn't move a BT Main socket. You bad, bad boy, no supper for you. BT would prefer you ask one of their engineers to move the mains socket that way they can mess up your skirting board and wall with staples, they've got qualifications in that you know.

MR Phone should be along soon and give you the full run down.

As far as the socket behind the heater, I'd guess the extension is not for a main socket but a slave. from memory the main is 2 wires the slave 3, but I'll leave it to mr phone to tell you correctly as I'm now guessing and haven't got my wiring diagram handy, no idea where it is :cb

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:45 pm 
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Firstly, don't worry about moving the master - BT are pricing themselves out of domestic work etc etc - I am surprised that they did not tell you to call a private engineer.
Connect incoming services to legs A+B........E is for earth calling lines only.
If you have a traditional master socket, the bottom half should come away revealing the IDC connectors - to which you attach a pair of wires to 2+5, 3. Do the same with the slave socket, with the same colour wires to the same numbered terminals.
Bit confused as to some of your explanation - photo's would be good??
Are you intending on running broadband in the house??


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:46 pm 
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Firstly, don't worry about moving the master - BT are pricing themselves out of domestic work etc etc - I am surprised that they did not tell you to call a private engineer.
Connect incoming services to legs A+B........E is for earth calling lines only.
If you have a traditional master socket, the bottom half should come away revealing the IDC connectors - to which you attach a pair of wires to 2+5, 3. Do the same with the slave socket, with the same colour wires to the same numbered terminals.
Bit confused as to some of your explanation - photo's would be good??
Are you intending on running broadband in the house??


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:26 pm 
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Unfortunately technical reasons (i.e. broken camera) mean I can't add any photos. I've added a diagram (see attachment) which I hope explains things better.

Basically in the original state the wire from the master socket ran along the skirting and behind the storage heater (via some terminal blocks like these http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A331811&ts=60819&id=32116).

The extension kit ran (from upstairs) down along the skirting and behind the storage heater. (See Original set-up on diagram). There is no way of knowing where the wire go once they are behind the heater but they dont seem to emerge anywhere else.


Anyway, when we decorated the bedroom I removed the extention socket and clipped the wire attached to it (wire 1 on diagram) about a meter from the storage heater (probably shouldn't have just left it like that but I did)

Then when we got BT to connect the line I plugged our phone into the master socket but got no tone. I removed the master socket and wired it up to the exposed extension wire (1 on diagram) and got a dial tone. So.... I permenantly moved the master socket onto the extension wire (see New Set-up on diagram)

Basically I just want to make sure that what I have done is not dangerous. I haven't got a clue where/what the wires do behind the heater so any suggestions would be welcome.


BTW
This may be completely irrelavent, but on the master socket side of the terminal blocks the wire (2 on diagram) was four core wire (solid cores). On the other side of the terminal block the wire (3 on diagram) was 4 core, but different, the wire in the 4 coloured cores was almost thread like in its make up rather than single cores of wire)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 3:08 pm 
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And the attachements! Sorry


Attachments:
New Wiring setup.JPG
New Wiring setup.JPG [ 7.47 KiB | Viewed 10420 times ]
Original Wiring setup.JPG
Original Wiring setup.JPG [ 9.86 KiB | Viewed 10420 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 8:10 pm 
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Does the UK run 2 wires only to each phone outlet?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 8:49 am 
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Sounds like a complete lash up - looking at the connector block and you saying that you have stranded wires within the cable. This is probably alarm cable.
I would rip it out and start again.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 1:11 pm 
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Ideally I would like to rip it out and start again (or more realistically pay somebody to do it for me)

However funds are pretty limited at the moment and i imagine it would cost a bit (especially as it would probably involve removing the storage heater, taking the bricks out etc). And also it seems to work perfectly well how I have set it up. The phone is working and the line is cristal clear so I am reluctant to fork out a load of cash just to make it look pretty.

Its more than likely been like this for over 5 yrs as previous owner rented the property out for that period. If it is dangerous (i.e. high risk of electrocution or fire) then I would obviously spend the cash. But I was under the impression that voltage/current in phone lines was pretty low (in relation to mains)


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 Post subject: BT Line
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 7:40 pm 
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Is your cable fed underground or overhead.

If it is overhead i would cut the cable outside, stop one of your local BT Engineers/Openreach. Ask him for a external Dropwire joint and some BT crimps. The pairs inside your dropwire are Orange/White and Green/Black They are pairs 1&2. Dial tone will be on pair one usually.
Crimp the wires leg to leg i.e orange to orange, white to white.

Run a new cable to your bt socket and following the terminations inside that. Main Cable to screw terminals at back extn cable to IDC connectors in the part that pulls out.

In order to provide ring current between a master and slave socket you need to connect 3 wires Dial tone on 5 and 2 and link wire on 3.

An easier way to do this is install 2 x masters although this will impact on the REN (ring equivalent number) of your phone system.

If you get stuck on getting any parts from BT let me know, I am good mates with my local BT Engineer. He has supplied me with BT components for the last 5 years always for a couple of pints

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 6:31 pm 
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Ringer Equivalence Number (REN)

This system was introduced at the same time as the Plug and Socket system to reduce problems with too many telephones on one line circuit. This is because customers could then connect any approved (and unapproved) apparatus into the new style sockets.

The REN value is based on the impedance of the ringer circuit and the current consumption, when idle, of the telephone.

Each telephone is given a REN value and the total REN of a BT line is assumed to be 4. The standard BT telephone No. 746 (with a 4000 ohm ringer) has a REN of 1. It can therefore be assumed that 4 of these telephones can be fitted with no problems


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