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 Post subject: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:06 pm 
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Hi all

So I need a new jigsaw as my old makita 18v has wandered off?? I am also going away from battery tools back to 240v (no more site work as sort of semi retired and just do work which I wish to)

I also just changed my energy plan and have been given a £150 Amazon gift card by EDF ( funny though, as I worked it out and this new plan will cost me £20 total on my energy bill over 2 years, so a £130 windfall :huray: ) which I intended to spend on a jigsaw and a palm router.

But I have become a tad confused reading reviews :?

I thought to buy a Hitachi CJ110MV https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000Y8IF5U for £90 and the katsu Trimmer £40 ( had the makita one but it also went walkies )but do not know now?

So between the above Hitachi and these:

Makita 4351FCT https://www.amazon.co.uk/Makita-4351FCT-Orbital-Action-Jigsaw/dp/B0013E4AKI £120

Bosch Professional GST 90 BE https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0028DKS0E £95

Bosch Professional GST 150 CE https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-Professional-GST-Corded-Jigsaw/dp/B005S3NVNC £155

Which do you think is better?

As to the work it is mainly for.... I still fit some kitchens (have 1 to do this month) but mainly for scribing fitted wardrobes (have 3 to do as and when I have time).

Even though I am rather old :shock: I have never used a 'barrel grip' jigsaw....are they really better for scribing?

Thanks for any viewpoint :-)


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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:30 pm 
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I've got the older type Bosch. I think it's a GST 80 PBE without going out to look.
30 years old. Done a lot of work over the years, but not really heavy site work day in day out.
I've used it to rough cut a lot of oak boards to manageable size over the years, as well as cutting a fair bit of steel, and ally.
If the newer model's anything like that it's what I'd go for.
I tried a "body grip" one back when I bought it, but I didnt like it as much as the handle type.



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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:36 pm 
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Cheers Dave, I think that I will try the Bosch Professional GST 150 CE (supposedly they made the first jigsaw) and I would like to try a 'body grip'.

With the £130 it will only cost me £30 so all good. Just wonder if I'm spending when I don't need to?

Ta and be well.


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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:50 pm 
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I don't have the large experience of different models like some here do.
I've tried different ones a time or two over the years, but they were DIY type kit and nothing felt as solid as the Bosch.
I know there was a thread on here a while back
so-you-think-festool-make-the-best-jigsaw-t63667.html
bosch-gst160-jigsaw-t85003.html

There might be more threads from a search
http://bit.ly/2jbX1rK

I don't think you'll be sorry if you get either of the Bosch tools.
Whether you are spending when you don't need to, only you can answer! :-)



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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 9:43 pm 
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I'm afraid to say that out of your tools the only one I have "in-depth familiarity" with is the 4351CT having used a hire model on a project a few years back - compact and solid (heavy) with adequate power. Competent. On the basis of using that I actually bought and continue to use the Makita BJV180 (nowadays the DJV180) 18 volt cordless jigsaw which is a good workhorse if a tad heavy on batteries. Not outstanding, but competent, yet again

lake wrote:
As to the work it is mainly for.... I still fit some kitchens (have 1 to do this month) but mainly for scribing fitted wardrobes (have 3 to do as and when I have time).

Even though I am rather old :shock: I have never used a 'barrel grip' jigsaw....are they really better for scribing?

Are they any better? Unequivocally, YES. But there are caveats - for the absolute best in scribing you need to work from the underside of the material, you need to use a body grip jigsaw, you need to use the right blade (Bosch T244D - nobody makes a better blade for the purpose , even Festool) and finally you need to invest in a Collins Coping Foot:





As ever there is a downside or two - the standard Coping Foot won't fit saws with extra/special blade guides (e,g Bosch GST135/GST140/GST160, Festool Trion/Carvex, Mafell P1cc, etc - there are versions for the Festool and P1cc respectively) and it isn't that cheap. I can also tell you that they don't work half as well on a D-handle jigsaw. My first one was on a very secondhand Mafell body grip jigsaw which was well past its' prime, but did the job for quite a few years:

Attachment:
Metabo body grip jigsaw and Collins Coping Foot 001-01.jpg
Metabo body grip jigsaw and Collins Coping Foot 001-01.jpg [ 29.12 KiB | Viewed 447 times ]


For anyone interested, these bases will fit most simple trade jigsaws and a few DIY type saws, but not many. Probably only worth it if you need to scribe copious quantities of large section cornice or skirting moulding

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"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:16 pm 
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Thanks for the reply guys, much appreciated. :cheers:

J and K .... I really respect your opinion when it comes to wood working, be it form or tools, so I will go with the Makita 4351FCT as I do wish to try a 'barrel grip'....and I just have to try the coping foot! (Which supposedly fits on that model )

I suspect the experience will be akin to the first time I tried the Fugi Silicone Kit ( also advise from this site members ) and thus comprehend that I have been doing 'it' the hard way for years lol.

So thank you once again.

Price wise the Makita is £120 and from the same site the Collins Coping Foot is £38, so £158 total ( already get delivery included ).... so my actual cost will be £8.... for a lot of fun :huray:

I can see that the coping foot will take some 'learning' which is great. ( lake goes and finds all the off cuts from the garage to practice on )

Thanks guys


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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:49 pm 
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lake wrote:
I can see that the coping foot will take some 'learning' which is great. ( lake goes and finds all the off cuts from the garage to practice on )

Make sure to get yourself a pack of Bosch T244D blades - they really do make a lot of difference to how well a coping foot works. Your experimentation may be better done on skirting board offcuts - cut a mitre, "shade" the cut edge by rubbing the edge of your pencil lead against it (makes it far easier to make out the cut line) then cut from beneath. For really long pieces of timber it can help to make-up a work holder like the one on the Collins web site or one like I show in my own photo in my previous post (not pretty, but functional) and lastly ALWAYS try to cut away from yourself as much as possible and keep your free hand BEHIND the saw, just in case (actually, pretty ruddy obvious and intuitive, I find) - yes I know what he does for the second part of the cut on the video, but that isn't how I'd do it......

Good luck with your purchase

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"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : lake
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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 9:22 am 
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ive recently went back to using my makita 4351 jigsaw after the carvex annoyed me when i was scribing a kitchen worktop to a wall.

i like the barrell grip of the carvex. think i need to watch the set up video for it. but if i have to mess on setting it up each blade change it will be going on some kind of journey..

been reccomended the festool trion as a much better jigsaw.

best one ive used was the maffell but its a bit pricey for a jigsaw like :lol: :lol:



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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:59 pm 
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Thanks fin, it is good to know that you have (and use) the makita 4351 and that j & k thinks it is 'competent' as it turned up today along with the coping foot.
If you 2 think it's up to scratch then it will be 'top dogs ********' for me :huray:

When I opened the box and looked at the makita tool box I thought that they had sent the wrong thing! It is so thin that I thought they must have sent a set of drill / screw bits!!
But no, there it was and it looks and feel like nice kit, so happy days.

The coping foot instructions state:

Quote:
THERE IS A LEARNING CURVE. You have taken off the training wheels and you are balancing on a single spot. Cut up some scrap pieces to get a feeling for free handing with a power saw.


Thankfully I do have some old odd lengths of skirting in the garage to play with....happy days :cheers:

Will post thoughts once I have some type of 'skill' with it.


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 Post subject: Re: Which jigsaw?
PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 9:18 am 
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fin wrote:
been reccomended the festool trion as a much better jigsaw.

best one ive used was the maffell but its a bit pricey for a jigsaw like :lol: :lol:

The Carvex has been a bit of a disaster for Festool - the first mode;l (PS400) was so unreliable that they "redesigned" it (i.e. removed features and made it more like the earlier Trion) and renamed it the PS420. TBH I bought a Bosch GST135BCE (now defunct) quite a few years back in preference to, and having tried, the Prion (PS300). I preferred the way that the Bosch tool automatically adjusted to different blade widths (AFAIK you need to fiddle with the Trion to do this). Downside of many of these extra guide jigsaws is that they tend to burn the back edge of the blade which can cause the blade to lose its' temper and soften.

I have the Mafell. Superb saw with bags of power. Eye watering price, however, I do agree

_________________
"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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