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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:08 pm 
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Please could anyone recommend the best hacksaw blade for cutting metal?

I’ve got a bunch of metal spindles to cut and have broken two cheap blades already ... help!

Bahco has a wide choice of blades, but I can’t tell which would be best for cutting metal spindles. What do you think? And is there anything better than Bahco? (I think Bahco quality isn’t what it was.)


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:22 pm 
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If it's a full size hacksaw you need the correct number of tpi for mild steel.

I've always bought just whatever's available for a Junior hacksaw, (which is what I'd usually cut spindles with), never broken one, the really cheap ones end up looking like a banana after not very long but shouldn't break.

How are you holding the spindles to cut them? Could be the technique that's at fault.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:07 pm 
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What size are the spindles? I usually buy Eclipse blades (12"), ideally you want at least 3 teeth engaged in the work.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:32 pm 
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AS already said, you need the right tpi for the thickness of metal you are cutting and a decent blade, correctly tensioned in the frame.
Then it's down to technique. Let the weight of the saw do most of the work, applying little if any down pressure. Use the full length of the blade, and saw steadily, don't try to cut quickly.
I keep a blade in a frame just for cutting non-ferrous metal, as well as the one used for steel. Same with files. Keep them just for steel or non ferrous. The blades aren't as likely to get the teeth blocked in the non-ferrous that way.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:40 pm 
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+1 for eclipse blades 18 or 24 tpi, 18 tpi is good all round blade - 14 tpi will cut thicker material but it may take a few pulls to get the cut started (a bit of masking tape on the metal stops the blade wandering)

tbh if you have a few to cut use a angle grinder - cut 1-2mm longer than you need and file to suit


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:28 pm 
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My main concern is how long it's taking me to cut through spindles, as I have a bunch to do.

I've been using a junior hacksaw. Would a 12" hacksaw make a difference?

Rorschach wrote:
What size are the spindles?

About 1cm thick.

ayjay wrote:
How are you holding the spindles to cut them? Could be the technique that's at fault.


I've been holding and sawing the spindles like I'd saw wood, cutting the flat side. (My background's in woodwork.) Should I do anything differently?

My first blade was almost 900 years old :wink: and so I wasn't surprised it broke. The second was a Hilka blade that had terrible reviews online and looked like a banana after very little use. Hence I was wondering about blade quality.

Many thanks for the Eclipse blades recommendation :thumbright:


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:40 pm 
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Get an evolution rage saw...

https://www.screwfix.com/p/evolution-r2 ... 240v/7277p

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:35 pm 
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At that size you would definitely be better off with a full size hacksaw frame. Car boot is your best friend, I have a couple of Eclipse 60b frames that were £1 each or less and cleaned up lovely, my personal favourite after trying a few styles. These days pistol grip seem to be more popular though personally I don't think they are as accurate.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 10:03 pm 
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Bahco or Eclipse blades, 18tpi covers most things to be honest.
Even a cheapy frame will do for occasional use, its the blade that really does the work.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 10:07 pm 
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Fancy_Dan wrote:
ayjay wrote:
How are you holding the spindles to cut them? Could be the technique that's at fault.


I've been holding and sawing the spindles like I'd saw wood, cutting the flat side. (My background's in woodwork.) Should I do anything differently?



I'd say it's quite difficult to hold them like that, they're not really large enough to hang on to, one slip and you're likely to damage the blade and both make it less effective and eventually lead to a break.

Either clamp them down or put them in a vice if you have a lot to do: in a work situation I use the door as a vice, leave the spindle in the lock, hold what will be the offcut with a pair of pliers, and saw away,( I use a Junior hacksaw for this), a bit of downward pressure with the pliers keeps it all firm enough, (watch your knuckles on the door). :-)

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 8:30 am 
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Whoops, I should have been clearer in my post. I have been clamping them down before sawing.

Many thanks for all the advice. I think I've learned:
- A full size hacksaw frame is worth it, but a cheap frame is OK
- The blades are more important than the frame: use Eclipse or Bahco blades with a TPI for mild steel (18 TPI? although Bahco's website recommends 32 TPI for metal?)
- Consider buying an Evolution Rage saw (which looks very handy!)

Did I miss any tricks?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:04 am 
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Fancy_Dan wrote:
Whoops, I should have been clearer in my post. I have been clamping them down before sawing.

Many thanks for all the advice. I think I've learned:
- A full size hacksaw frame is worth it, but a cheap frame is OK
- The blades are more important than the frame: use Eclipse or Bahco blades with a TPI for mild steel (18 TPI? although Bahco's website recommends 32 TPI for metal?)
- Consider buying an Evolution Rage saw (which looks very handy!)

Did I miss any tricks?


My full size hacksaw frame is a good one that I've had for many years so I don't know if a cheap one is just as good, but for a Junior hacksaw I've found that cheap ones are next to useless, (someone nicked mine and I bought a couple of cheapies on the way to replacing it with a good one).

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:56 pm 
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Junior hacksaws are OK for cutting small stuff up to about 6mm, plastic and so on. Light work.
Full size frame for anything else.
As ayjay says a proper junior frame makes a difference. Preferably one that you can tension with a screw. Apart from anything else a mate of mine gave himself a really bad cut that needed stitches when he was putting the blade in one of those bent wire frames.



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:16 pm 
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A hacksaw is usually 12", It will give you a longer stroke - the problem with a 32tpi blades is they are very fine, it will take longer to cut the item and tend not to clear the chips away (blades can clog)



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:52 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
A Apart from anything else a mate of mine gave himself a really bad cut that needed stitches when he was putting the blade in one of those bent wire frames.


My original one was a bent wire frame, (fairly sure it was an Eclipse) but they were probably made better 50 years ago.

It got nicked by a young plumber - typical manic rush on the last day of a job, he wanted to cut some plastic pipe and asked to borrow a Stanley knife.

I lent him one and suggested he try the Junior hacksaw.

Saw him about an hour later and he said I've put your Stanley knife back in your toolbox. I said, "What about the hacksaw".

"Oh, I lost that" he said. Lying Toerag, you nicked it cos it was a goodun.

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