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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 3:50 pm 
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I sort of thought it was some weird Scottish dialect term (sorry, Stevie!) - but then I came across this.......

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eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 001 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg
eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 001 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg [ 231.55 KiB | Viewed 1006 times ]


This is an all-aluminium worm drive framing saw.....

Attachment:
eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 002 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg
eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 002 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg [ 244.65 KiB | Viewed 1006 times ]


Made by Black & Decker at their Harmondsworth factory in London. It's a 220/250 volt model (so made for the European market) and has the model number 95. But most interestingly of all, they call it the "Ripsnorter"

Attachment:
eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 003 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg
eBay #272758762042 19-Jul-2017 003 B&D Ripsnorter.jpg [ 193.64 KiB | Viewed 1006 times ]


Which all goes to show how strange truth can be, I suppose. #

Black & Decker actually came to the UK in 1925 and Harmondsworth started to manufacture before WWII. Much of the manufacturing activity was switched to a new site in Spennymoor, Co. Durham in the late 1960s but Harmondsworth continued to be used until its closure in 1984. No idea when this item was made, though

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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For this message the author Job and Knock has received thanks - 2: Dave54, steviejoiner74
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:14 pm 
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Wow! You live and learn! Thought it was just a Scottish thing but surely that's where the term originates!


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:24 pm 
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Does it work?
On an rcd protected circuit. . .
Looks "Mid 20th Century" as they say.
Wartime or just after?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:15 pm 
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Just seen one of these pop up on the dewalt group on Facebook!
Never seen one in my life and see two in a week!


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:22 pm 
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Must have been a real eye opener at the time.
I heard a local radio piece about an old joiner. Must have been 20+ years ago.
He said about making a sash window in a day mostly with hand tools.

Dad had an saw attachment for his "Wolf Cub" drill. Late 50s.
It worked OK. I used it a couple of times later on.
He made me a toy castle out of ply that he cut using that, and painted it with green and grey paint mixed with sand.
Wish I still had that,


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:27 pm 
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"It's a 220/250 volt model so made for the European market"

Not necessarily as voltage wasn't standardised in Britain until the early 1960's. What voltage( and sometimes whether it was AC or DC-yes they had DC mains in the old days) you got depended on where you lived. Some pit villages for example may have been fed off the mine generator, or rows of terraces from local factories generators. What they had, you had. This made it rather tricky when buying appliances, and you had to make sure that your appliances would suit the supply if you moved house. This is why things like old radios and TV's used to have voltage selectors so you could alter them to suit- and not overrun your valves!

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 10:08 pm 
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Does the name originate from a bull pulling the ring out of its nostril whilst snorting and pawing at the ground?Yes I know bulls don`t have paws,haha :)

I have an ancient B&D hedge trimmer,alloy body.I expect rubber gloves and wellies would be needed to use it?Must dig it out and put it on ebay,it might fetch a shilling or three?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:41 am 
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Timllfixit wrote:
"It's a 220/250 volt model so made for the European market"

Not necessarily as voltage wasn't standardised in Britain until the early 1960's

Are you aware that B&D are an American company and that in the USA and Canada 220/250 volt in a "domestic" circuit is relatively scarce? Highly that B&D would manufacture here fpor eport to the USA if nothing else due to the high costs of shipping.

My parents were given a Hoover electric vacuum cleaner as a wedding present in the late 1940s. It was rated at 220/250 volts AC and followed us around Scotland, England and Wales during the period in the 50s to 70s when I was growing up (my old man worked for the Scottish Office and later the Home Office). The mains voltage was the same wherever we went.

My own experience of working in industry (automation) is that whilst by the 1980s there were still a few industrial sites, funnily enough often paper mills, which generated their own power, often DC, the vast majority of industrial users had converted to taking electricy from the mains between WWII and the 1960s. Domestic electrical supply (as would have been used by small workshops, etc) was standrdised following the creation onf the National Grid in the 1930s and looking through advertising for power tools from the 1940s onwards it is evident that whilst alternative voltages were offered during the 1940s and 1950s the vast majority of power tools sold after WWII were 230/250 volt @ 50Hz AC.

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : Dave54
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:52 am 
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Just as an aside, as a kid growing up in the 60's I remember that doing a Ripsnorter was a common term for a fart. I wonder what came first? The alternate word for farting or the saw????

DWD


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:22 pm 
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i must get mesel along to that spennymoor place... hope the locals dont call it speneymoower urghhhhhhh

theres a couple of ali bodied drills in my dads lock up. ancient owld things they are haha

personally i find ripsnorter to be a propper cringeworthy name ha :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 1:48 pm 
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I think that by the time that saw was made, most places in the UK would have been on the grid. Certainly towns of any size. The National grid was started before WWII, and I know there was a big push to take it to more rural areas after the war, because my dad was involved with that in Worcestershire and Shropshire. He used to say they were working putting the lines in during the Winter of '47 (Which was notoriously bad)
Until that happened, places like Kidderminster had been fed by there own small generating station driven by a steam engine. I think their supply was DC. That only fed the main town though.
Certainly here in Cornwall there were places with no mains availability (probably) into the 60s. Lister Start o matics were the main source of electricity on many farms. They needed electricity for the milking machines.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:45 pm 
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Lynton and Lynmouth had their own power station, which was destroyed in the flood, sometime in the 1950's. I remember my mum telling me that she remembers the electricity boards sending them a form to list all their electrical appliances, so they could be converted free of charge to the "new" 240 volts. I'm not sure when that was, but it was before I was born.

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