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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:15 am 
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I watched a video on youtube where paul sellers restored a hand plane and when he reground the 25° bevel with sandpaper he didn't get a burr but when he did a 30° bevel he said he had a burr. I've watched another paul sellers video where he sharpened a plane iron and when he got a burr he showed you so I'm wondering if he was using a better quality blade.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 12:58 pm 
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I don't know mate, at a guess fairly coarse grinding on the aluminium oxide paper (It's not called"sandpaper" much these days as there are many types of abrasive available) doesn't tend to raise much of a burr.
A finer stone will raise a burr.
The proof of the pudding is in the eating though. A blade is either sharp or it's not. A blunt blade, or one that's not quite right, is soon obvious when you start working with it once you have a bit of experience.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:24 pm 
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On reflection, a couple of things strike me about this thread; firstly the OP doesn't mention what his abrasive sheets are sat on when sharpening. Is it a wooden board? Or a kitchen worktop? Or what? And is it attached in any way? Secondly, alox papers are frankly not equal to the task of heavy grinding, IMHO. For coarser grits, up to about 120 or 150 at least I'd be using silicon carbide paper, not alox paper. They cut fastr and cleaner than alox as well as lasting longer. Finally, what grits is the OP using?

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:38 am 
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There's at least one answer J& K

curtains wrote:
I used an eclipse type honing guide that uses a 50mm projection for a 25° bevel. I set the projection to 50mm and used either 60 or 80 grit aluminium oxide sandpaper to regrind the bevel.

I've personally used similar for just that operation when I had nothing else to hand albeit without the guide. I've also used such things as the internal faces of Ashland blocks too , needs must and all that but have always put the papers on a flat sheet of ply at least.
Going off on a tangent but 100-150 grit sandpaper glued to a board does make a very good bench hook for planing very thin strips of timber that are difficult to hold otherwise.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:59 pm 
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60g or 80g alox is going to take forever to grind a nick out - silicon carbide is far faster and more effective. The substrate (i.e. what is beneath the paper) can also be significant. I've tried MDF and plywood in the past and found both to be a bit soft - a piece of float glass, even a thin bit mounted onto two thicknesses of 18mm MDF (making 36mm) is more effective - it's dead flat and it won't deform under pressure. The alternative might be a cheap granite cutting board, such as those sold by people like Argos for £8 to £12.

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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