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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:24 am 
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Hello, I just wanted to know what you guys and girls would use to fix cabinet hanger brackets to a plastered brick wall.
Which type of fixings are best.
I was considering plugless masonary screws.
What length for the fixing would be ideal, 3"?

Many thanks


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 1:29 pm 
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I normally use 2in no8 screws with a red wall plug

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:48 pm 
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:withstupid:

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 10:28 pm 
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2" no8's with red rawplugs it is then. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 10:33 pm 
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Also are pan head screws recommended?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:28 pm 
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Pan heads are fine if you happen to have some to use up - some brackets are provided with screws in the pack and they may well be pan heads, but there's no need, ordinary countersunk screws are fine, they're not going to be visible, and the rest of the box will be more use to you in future - just don't use cheap screws, they can and do rust in kitchens.



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:43 pm 
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I would use 2" #10 screws and brown plugs, but #8's are probably fine.. I like to over engineer things!

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:53 pm 
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Generally brown plugs for anything load bearing like that, screw size is umm whatever I have in stock that looks about right lol.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:10 pm 
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Quote:
screw size is umm whatever I have in stock that looks about right lol.


...and the biggest ones that fit through the holes........ :wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 9:11 am 
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Timllfixit wrote:
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screw size is umm whatever I have in stock that looks about right lol.


...and the biggest ones that fit through the holes........ :wink:



Bigger is always better :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 1:59 pm 
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I like to over engineer stuff also just a habit I can't seem to lose.
Anyway uno red rawl plugs are 28mm in length which is almost half the size of 2" screws!
So do I whack in two plugs in each hole or will one plug suffice?


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 2:27 pm 
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manny wrote:
I like to over engineer stuff also just a habit I can't seem to lose.
Anyway uno red rawl plugs are 28mm in length which is almost half the size of 2" screws!
So do I whack in two plugs in each hole or will one plug suffice?



No you only need to use one plug per hole!

Use a 5.5mm or 6mm drill bit and drill to just under the 2in depth push the plug in to the hole and screw the bracket on.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 5:28 pm 
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philprime wrote:
manny wrote:
I like to over engineer stuff also just a habit I can't seem to lose.
Anyway uno red rawl plugs are 28mm in length which is almost half the size of 2" screws!
So do I whack in two plugs in each hole or will one plug suffice?



No you only need to use one plug per hole!

Use a 5.5mm or 6mm drill bit and drill to just under the 2in depth push the plug in to the hole and screw the bracket on.


Thanks for the advise mate. I got me a 5.5 bit.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 12:07 pm 
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Quick question/query again lol.
I have a Milwaukee C18DD-32 18V Cordless, it's a drill driver combi without a hammer function.
Will this be upto the job for drilling holes in brick.
Il be using a nice new Bosch masonary bit so I was hoping the drill will be upto the job?
Or do I really need a hammer drill? Can't find my Bosch 110v hammer drill!


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 1:53 pm 
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You should have no issues, drilling without hammer action, unless they are hard bricks

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