Snapped Head

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knights
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Snapped Head

Post by knights » Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:46 pm

Afternoon people, just changing door hinges and I have snapped a screw in oak door lining. Literally I am unable to get it out as it has snapped below the wood level. Photo attached. What can I do to extract the screw?

Regards

Ray
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Maz123
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Maz123 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:58 pm

You could try drilling it. Small HSS bit...but go steady so it doesn't slip and damage surrounding area or make hole bigger.
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Rorschach » Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:59 pm

Unless it's brass you won't be able to drill it out.

Plug cutter is the best way, leaves a nice neat hole and then you can glue in a matching plug to repair.
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Maz123 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 2:12 pm

I've drilled out screws that weren't brass...but a plug cutters a good idea :-)
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Rorschach » Sun Apr 14, 2019 3:53 pm

Maz123 wrote:I've drilled out screws that weren't brass...but a plug cutters a good idea :-)
Older screws are sometimes soft enough but most modern screws are hardened (hence why they snap so easily) and it's almost impossible to get a drill to bite properly and not skid all over the place making a right mess.
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Job and Knock
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Job and Knock » Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:52 pm

:withstupid:

In any case trying to get a drill bit to centre in a ragged broken edge of a 4.5mm screw can be pretty difficult. The plug cutter trick (ideally a tube-type plug cutter because they run on the edge of the tool) followed by gluing-in a hardwood dowel and trimming it off with a sharp chisel is a far easier easier approach.
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Avoid the temptation to attempt this with the more common 2- or 4-prong plug cutter:
4-prong Plug Cutter 001_01.JPG
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Trying that will only end in tears (or worse).

One tip - make sure that you have a plug which can fit the hole left by the plug cutter before starting, or at least be prepared to use a standard twist bit to enlarge the hole to accommodate a standard size plug
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Dave54 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 6:36 pm

Didn't Axminster do a kit with a hollow drill and plug cutter for just this job at one time? Possibly back in the 90s?
I remember they used to do dowel with a small hole down the middle for fixing loose screw holes in wood.
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Job and Knock » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:27 am

I know that Rutlands did thin-walled tubular saw bits for this purpose - they were rather prone to unravelling themselves in tougher woods like oak (spiral welded tube)
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Rorschach » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:17 am

I use a homemade hole saw just made from a bit of pipe with teeth filed into it using a triangular file. Only takes about 10 minutes to make and you will get a few holes before you need to sharpen it, which once the teeth are established only takes a minute.
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Re: Snapped Head

Post by Dave54 » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:44 am

Job and Knock wrote:I know that Rutlands did thin-walled tubular saw bits for this purpose - they were rather prone to unravelling themselves in tougher woods like oak (spiral welded tube)
That's probably what I was thinking of. I remember them being advertised in "The Woodworker" etc.
Rorschach wrote:I use a homemade hole saw just made from a bit of pipe with teeth filed into it using a triangular file. Only takes about 10 minutes to make and you will get a few holes before you need to sharpen it, which once the teeth are established only takes a minute.
Good idea! :thumbright:

TBH I usually use a small gouge to get to the point where I can grab the screw stub, then normal drill / plug.

OK with new work, and the occasional brass screw, not so easy with rusted in old steel screws.

Brass screws these days are carp. You only have to see the difference in colour between a box of old UK made screws, and new ones made abroad. Much more zinc in the new ones i reckon.
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