Built in wardrobe help

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BrenDIY
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Built in wardrobe help

Post by BrenDIY » Thu Jun 07, 2018 7:45 pm

Good evening folks,

First post to the forum but long time lurker. I can usually find good advice here.

I am currently trying to build a built in short wardrobe under the sloping eave in our loft conversion. I have made the required wedges to build a plinth down from the rafters rather than using the plastic bracket available.

My problem is there is no rafter at either end of the 3.6m run to fix a widget to support the the plank i will screw to the wedges to support the rail and attach the fascia too.

One end wall is plasterboard brick and the other plasterboard study wall.

Question is how could i support the approx 50cm ends of the plank if I have no suitable rafter to fix a wedge too.
IMG_20180607_192843.jpg
IMG_20180607_192843.jpg (33.02 KiB) Viewed 1122 times
I was thinking of beefing up the "strike plates" to 2x4 sand have them support the plank.

All suggestions thoughts and criticisms welcome.

B
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big-all
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by big-all » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:47 pm

heeelllooo and welcome BrenDIY :welcome: :welcome: :welcome:
not exactly sure about you question [probably me not you :lol: ]
often the solution is
to cut out the plasterboard
fix timbers to the roof and ceiling
re insulate and re install plasterboard
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by Grendel » Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:38 am

An alternative to cutting out the plasterboard would be to fix mdf cheeks to the sides.
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by BrenDIY » Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:39 am

Good morning and thank you for you replies big-all and Grendel.

I was hoping to avoid cutting the plasterboard as to repair would be another skill to learn to complete this project. But if I have to I will do it. Luckily it would be mostly hidden :wink:

I might display my ignorance here but I can't seem to find out 100% what a mdf cheek is. best guess it would be similar to and end panel. :scratch:

I have attached a quick sketch that may help explain my issue. Excuse the poor drawing skills at my desk in work.
Exp drawing.png
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It is basically how do I best support the ends of the plank to which I will attach the top rail too.

I was hoping to keep the opening to the 3600mm for four handiness but am open to suggestion including how to cut plasterboard, install noggin etc.

I will probably have more questions as I am learning a lot on this project and even planning to build the doors myself. I figured I could by the materials and some tools and do it myself twice over for the prices I was quoted.

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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by Grendel » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:10 pm

Yes sorry , a cheek is basically just an end panel like in your drawing. Cut it to the size of the wardrobe or just inside the door runners and screw to the wall. On the plaster brick end it's a pretty simple offer it up and fix type of thing , on the other it might be a case off fixing into a stud wherever one is and probably gluing as well . Once in place you have a panel that will be firm enough and easy enough to screw your bearers to.
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by BrenDIY » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:22 pm

Grendel wrote:Yes sorry , a cheek is basically just an end panel like in your drawing. Cut it to the size of the wardrobe or just inside the door runners and screw to the wall. On the plaster brick end it's a pretty simple offer it up and fix type of thing , on the other it might be a case off fixing into a stud wherever one is and probably gluing as well . Once in place you have a panel that will be firm enough and easy enough to screw your bearers to.


I see said the blind man.
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by BrenDIY » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:14 pm

Update.

Well after some exploratory hole making and some head scratching :scratch: I decided to cut channels into the plasterboard to get to the next rafters to secure my frame that way.

Finding that the LHS was insulated board dot dabbed onto the block of the gable and the RHS was an insulated internal stud wall. I have never come across dot dab before.

Note: Always move wife's basket of freshly laundered clothes from the room you are cutting plasterboard with and oscillating multitool :angryfire:

I now plan to build and level a short plinth (as coming up to skirting height seemed excessive) and frame out the space for the doors.

Now for the guts, basically I was planning on a central ~1800mm unit with a shelf roughly central corresponding the start of the slope behind. Is 1800mm too much for 2'x1' lipped 18mm mr mdf? Clotes etc storage. Two ~900mm units on each side of this with the same construction.

Should I leave a gap all round for airflow?

I will make the door once I have measurements from frame. Will be approx. 900x1000 and there will be 4 running on a double top track.

Doors to be face planted 6mm on 18mm. They could be convinced to learn from to use a router and use stile rail and glue method.

Sorry if all a bit disjointed, writing with hungry toddler on my lap. All advice/criticism/mickey taking welcome.

Regards
Bren.
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by Grendel » Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:20 am

1800mm is quite a span for 18mm mdf and on it's own ouldn't be ideal. If possible I'd put a divider below it to act as another leg. This would then give you support and you'd not really lose much in the way of hanging space. If this isn't possible and I understand there are times when it's not then I'd run a timber , in this case 2x1 , across from both sides set back a little from the front edge. While it's always easy to say not to overload a shelf it's almost certain to happpen at sometime , just human nature really so if you can "over engineer" it's never a bad thing .
With regards to airflow again it's never going to hurt even if it's not necessary . I have come across built in wardrobes where the clothes hung close to a solid wall which was cooler and lead to a condensation problem and mould appeared on some clothes. I built a slatted back and sides to the wardrobe which kept a gap between the clothes and wall and solved the problem.
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Re: Built in wardrobe help

Post by Job and Knock » Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:31 pm

BrenDIY wrote:Now for the guts, basically I was planning on a central ~1800mm unit with a shelf roughly central corresponding the start of the slope behind. Is 1800mm too much for 2'x1' lipped 18mm mr mdf? Clotes etc storage. Two ~900mm units on each side of this with the same construction.
Basically, yes (too much). If you'd like to check the sag onb a shelf that long, then try the Sagulator to calculate exact;ly ho much the shelf will sag under load
BrenDIY wrote:Should I leave a gap all round for airflow?
It wouldn't harm - one of our wardrobes (installed by a previous owner) suffers from condensation because of a cold outside wall
BrenDIY wrote:Doors to be face planted 6mm on 18mm. They could be convinced to learn from to use a router and use stile rail and glue method.
It will work, but make sure that you aren't exceeding the thickness allowed by the track system (24mm would be too much for most concealed hinges). The main problem with planting on this way is that it can be difficult to get the glue line to disappear
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