Dry Rot

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otronics
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Dry Rot

Post by otronics » Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:43 am

Following on from this thread: rotten-support-and-floorboards-lack-of- ... 89742.html

One portion of my downstairs area had no sub floor ventilation.

It now does and the area is drying out.

I have replaced and treated the timber I can access.

Lack of ventilation has left dry rot and I have suffered all of these:

Image

Since installing the vent, spores (1 on the image) are still appearing on the nearby floor.

No more fruiting bodies etc though which is nice.

Any dry rot tips?

Looks like it is still active.
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ayjay
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Re: Dry Rot

Post by ayjay » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:37 am

otronics wrote: I have replaced and treated the timber I can access.
At one time in my career, I did a lot of work for a large Housing Association in London, money was no object, it all came from the Government back in the 80s.

The standard procedure for treating dry rot (and we encountered it regularly) was to remove all timber within one metre of any affected timber and burn it, everything left was treated, not just the timber but the brickwork and plaster, the soil in the oversite, everything.

Istr also that for health reasons we had to vacate the jobs for a few days after treatment, you really do have to be ruthless with it.
One day it will all be firewood.
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wine~o
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Re: Dry Rot

Post by wine~o » Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:05 pm

Dry rot is evil. Once it's in the building it will destroy anything and everything in it's path.

As Ayjay says remove anything and everything that shows the slightest sign of having been affected... and then some.
Verwood Handyman

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otronics
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Re: Dry Rot

Post by otronics » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:38 pm

But doesn't the timber need to be damp for it to affect it?
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steviejoiner74
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Re: Dry Rot

Post by steviejoiner74 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:51 pm

otronics wrote:But doesn't the timber need to be damp for it to affect it?
About 28-30% to kick off an outbreak then it only needs about 20% moisture content to sustain it.
I'm in agreement with ayjay,that's the standard method of treatment.
Carpentry,I can explain it to you but I cannot understand it for you.
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