HINGE FITTING

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martin281
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HINGE FITTING

Post by martin281 » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:10 pm

Hi everyone :hello2:

I have some three inch hinges to fit on some new doors, but I am a little stuck :oops:

Do I rebate (think that is the correct word) out the hinge into the door itself, so that it fits flush with the door or do I rebate out half of the hinge so that one leaf sits flush with the door and then rebate out the frame for the other leaf on the hinge?

I have seen this done both ways and I don't know what the pro's and cons are of both methods?

Thanks Mart.
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Post by Gadget » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:23 pm

Half and half is the way to go, this helps to stop the hinge slipping down with the weight of the door!
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Post by big-all » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:23 pm

it should be rebated and flush with the surface of both door and frame
you should also have a 2mm even gap all the way round

but on some cheaper hinges you cannot rebate into both door and frame as the leaves are only around 1mm apart
so the simple answer is look at your hinge and fit accordingly :thumbright:
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Post by martin281 » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:27 pm

Thanks guys :thumbright:

The hinges are only cheap ones they are 3 inch electro brassed loose pin.

I'm sure the old ones were rebated into the door fully, I'll check when I get home :wink:

Thanks again :thumbright:
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Post by panlid » Sun Dec 23, 2007 5:23 pm

martin if you follow the book then 50/50
if they are cheap and your not precious the just bang the lot into the door, it wont drop. more important is that you pilot drill the screw holes so the wood doesnt split.
the purists will scoff but in the real world..... :wink:
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Post by Tryanything » Sun Dec 23, 2007 5:50 pm

Hi Martin281
House the hinge into the door and the frame so that each leaf is flush
The pros and cons are any other way looks shite and unprofessional :lol:
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Post by panlid » Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:04 pm

flush has got nothing to do with it.
as big all says it is about fitting accordingly.
most e brass hinges are between 1 or 2 mm gap. but ive had them nearly touching.
if you really feel the need to do both then close the hinge so each leaf is parralel.
then look at the gap. if it is about 2mm then fit the flush. if any more than sink them in leaving a 2 mm gap.
we may talk about profesional but i change alot of doors and most houses built in the last 20 years tended to be single sunk.
as for the door dropping, depends on the door. i have removed all the screws from higes on some doors and the paint has kept it fom dropping. ive had to yank it to loosen it.
also sinking them in both legs is a bit trickier. with this being a diy forum all im saying is that if you just fit them in the door then it wont be any different from most doors nowadays and is alot easier.
if it is a standard door and you pilot the screw holes i promise it wont drop.
now you will just have see if you can live with yourself for not sinking both :wink: :lol:
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Post by Steve. F » Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:23 pm

Hello Martin,
I have hung many doors in my time as a joiner and the question on how to hinge a door correctly is debatable.
There are many different methods depending on the hinge type.
Now to keep this as simple as possible,
If these hinges are of the flush loose pin type they do not require checking into door or frame at all as they are a fairly light weight hinge more suited to diy jobs and screwed directly to door and frame.
Next would be the most common type , Butt hinge.
This type of hinge will require checking into both door and frame but it all depends on what style of butt hinge it is,
If you open the leafs of the hinge so they are parrallel with each other you should have a gap around 2mm between them, this is the ideal spacing around all sides of a good fitting door.
If this is the case then the hinge can be checked equally into door and frame so that each leaf sits flush with both.
If the gap is a lot larger than this and it may well be on an electro brassed hinge unless the leafs of hinge are cranked, you may have to check it into frame flush and into door slightly more, if you have to do this then the check you cut in door must taper from the thickness of the hinge at the rear back to whatever depth you will need at the front to keep a 2mm gap once hung.
Its an art to hang doors successfully and keep an even 2mm gap between door and frame and lots of time this is impossible if fitting to old frames where frame shrinkage has increased door opening size considerably however stick with the points above and you should do ok, i will say though its advisable to fit door to frame first before fitting any hinges as the door frame lintol may not always be level and the top of door may need trimmed to suit shape of frame.
Another important point to remember is that on a loose pin hinge MAKE SURE that you give the hinge full ball !
This is so that once hung the pin of the hinge is clear of frame and Architrave and can be pulled out and door removed.
I have seen many a doors hung by so called joiners where they have fitted a set of loose pin hinges and set them in half ball, this to a trained eye not only looks daft on a loose pin hinge but makes it impossible to remove hinge pins for removing door, defeating the purpose of fitting loose pin hinges in the first place.
Hope this helps.
:grin:
regards
Steve.
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Post by Mackster » Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:32 pm

Many Thanks for your replies (not that it was my original post)

I'm just hanging doors myself into some casings I fitted and some that were already in situ. From the info I gleaned off the site, I took my time and the casings I fitted are spot on plumb (thanks again folks).

I hung the doors and all had a 2mm gap around the sides and top of the door and swung perfectly. They probably had a little more at the bottom, maybe 6mm. It took me a long time to hang them but I was well chuffed with myself for getting them just so. However.................................... being a complete novice I didn't have the carpets laid. :sad: :angryfire: ::b :cussing:

I understand this was a silly silly move and have been heavily berated for it by a lot of my mates :oops:

Anyway a couple of questions:
1) they are the basic PREMDOOR 6 panel type white doors, I've had to split a couple in order to move the bottom wooden baton up and I tried to glue the piece of wood back in but had little success so I had to pin it back in place instead. Whats the usual method if you have to split them????

2)Latches and handles. How high up do you fit them???? Anyone point me in the direction of a technique for fitting them. I've got some ideas how to fit the latches but any tips would be greatly, I mean GREATLY appreciated.

3) The carpet and underlay makes a big difference to the level of the floor. Is it a case of just taking it off bit by bit or is there a prescribed method for taking about the right amount off. It's more difficult now as we're living in the house and the carpets etc are down so missus gets p***ed off with elctric plane being used upstairs.

Thanks Folks :thumbright:

PS Sorry for hijacking your post Martin
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Post by big-all » Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:46 pm

mmm hope your doors have a lock block both sides

did your doors have "L" or"H" on the top!! if not there will be a lock block centraly on each side so go for centre of the door and fit the lock central

how much did you take off the bottom in the first place!!!

did you clean the inside surface before you tried to glue the wood back in!!!

did you use clamps!!!

now you have the added problem of nails on the cut line for the carpet
Last edited by big-all on Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Mackster » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:07 pm

Hi,

Yes cleaned the inside, used clamps and woodglue (rapidset stuff whether thats not as good I'm not sure).

Yes the lock block is marked and is on the correct side.

Proabably took about 4mm of the bottom initially and 2-3mm of the top.

The pins are no problem. I've corrected 1 of the doors and got them out with a bit of jiggery pokery. Is glueing the usual method though?? If it is what glue do you normally use???

Middle height of the door it is then, Thanks
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Post by big-all » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:13 pm

rapid glue [10 mins ]would need to be left clamped for about 1hr at room temp or about 3hrs at 8 degrees

if there is a chance the frost has got at the glue or it is more than 9 months old it may be knackerd

you should have been ok with only 4mm coming off the bottom

what did the instructions say because usualy 12mm is ok off the bottom
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Post by Mackster » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:48 pm

Right,

I've obviously done something wrong when stickeing it. I'll take more time next one.

Is there any method for trimming the bottom of the doors or is it just take it steady, bit at a time??
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Post by big-all » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:56 pm

depends how much less than 5mm plane/belt sander it off

or circsaw hand saw ect above 5mm and dont forget to put a chamfer on all cut edges
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Post by Mackster » Sun Dec 30, 2007 11:06 pm

Right,

Thanks for the help BIG ALL.

Onwards and upwards.

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