Condensation problem on windows

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sdowen
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Condensation problem on windows

Post by sdowen » Sun Jan 04, 2009 1:27 pm

I live in a two bed garden flat in London, which is the bottom half of a converted terrace house. I have a big problem with condensation in two rooms in the house with water running down the windows and doors and gathering on the woodwork and even dripping from the windows onto the floor and waking us up in the bedroom.

1. Front bedroom, two very large floor to ceiling windows which have double glazing but the seal may be broken as the double glazing is old.

2. Lounge at the rear of the property which has 3 windows and some double patio doors (no doubel glazing).

I have an internal bathroom with no window but have fitted a very powerful extractor fan.

I know new double glazing might solve the problem but is there anything I can do in the interim as I cannot afford new double glazing at the moment.

Any help welcome.
thanks
Simon. ::b
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EJJ150847
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Post by EJJ150847 » Sun Jan 04, 2009 2:11 pm

Improve the ventilation and heating.
Condensation occurs where moist air comes into contact with air, or a surface, which is at a lower temperature.Warm air holds more moisture than cold air. When moist air comes into contact with a colder surface, the air is unable to retain the same amount of moisture and the water is released to form condensation on the surface.


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big-all
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Post by big-all » Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:11 pm

heeeelllooo and welcome simon :welcome: :welcome: :welcome:




you must ventilate with the door closed on the bathroom

you must also ventilate whilst cooking

other don'ts are

dont dry washing in doors
dont use parafin or bottled gas for heating

double glazing wont solve the problem it may just move it to the next coldest surface

as said above ventilation this may be acheived by vents or opening the room window for an hour or so immediatley after you turn the heating off in the morning
not nessiserily wide open but enough to feel the air flow
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Post by sdowen » Tue Jan 06, 2009 10:26 am

Thanks for the response here chaps.

I do open the windows when possible but am keen not to leave them open when not home for security issues and at night as our bedroom faces the road and there are noise issues.

I had thought about fitting an airbrick in the front bedroom as there does not seem to be one, either that or drilling some holes in the window and fitting some kind of sliding ventilation mechansim. Would this would?

Any thoughts welcome?

Thanks again
Simon.
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big-all
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Post by big-all » Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:57 pm

you should only have to open windows for an hour or so in each affected room

you havent said if you indulge is moisture creating activities like drying clothes on radiators!!!!
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Post by sdowen » Tue Jan 06, 2009 1:26 pm

Ok,

And yes we do dry clothes on radiators, just until the sun gets warm enough and we can dry them outside.
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Post by big-all » Tue Jan 06, 2009 3:25 pm

full load of washing 25=40p in the tumble dryer

maybe 1 to£2 a week for 12 weeks total cost £30!!!

consiquences

mold damp
possible repaint redecoration replaster :scratch:

providing extra ventilation will help but at greater heating costs because of extra heat loss :scratch:
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Post by clare123 » Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:39 am

i have this prob
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Post by big-all » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:16 pm

heeellooo clare123

let us know if the measures suggested dont work then we can try other solutions :thumbright:
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