Lidl SDS drill

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Rorschach
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Rorschach »

stevec59 wrote:I wasn't sure what a rotor stop was, so I googled it

"The final advantage of many SDS drill is rotary stop. This means you can attach a chisel and rip tiles of walls in seconds (they just wouldn't come of easily with a bolster chisel and hammer)"

So I guess the one I put the link to you can't use for chiselling.

What about this one from B&Q

http://www.diy.com/departments/mac-alli ... 872_BQ.prd

Yep that one as roto-stop and looks to be light weight too. No good for concrete or anything but should be fine for tiles as you want.
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by DmitriKara »

Rorschach wrote:The 2kg relates to the Impact weight, not the weight of the drill itself.
I bet that somebody was fully aware how misleading that looks like... I have always had a bad opinion about lidl..

ps: cheap tools often end up costing more is what I've learned from this story. That's why I would prefer to spend a few quids more and have less to worry about :scratch:
Rorschach
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Rorschach »

DmitriKara wrote:
Rorschach wrote:The 2kg relates to the Impact weight, not the weight of the drill itself.
I bet that somebody was fully aware how misleading that looks like... I have always had a bad opinion about lidl..

ps: cheap tools often end up costing more is what I've learned from this story. That's why I would prefer to spend a few quids more and have less to worry about :scratch:

I would have to disagree, I have a workshop containing both very cheap and very expensive tools, the key is spending the correct amount for the job in hand. A full set of festool tools for the occasional DIY'er that mostly works with Ikea flat packs is silly, as is a full time tradesman trying to get get away using Silverline tools. Right tool, right price for the right job :)
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Dave54 »

I reckon Lidl's tools are good value in general. The tools are good enough for "light trade" or DIY I'd have said. Certainly the belt sander I have, bought almost "accidentally" at half the price of repairing my ELU belt sander, has done loads of work, and is still going strong.
You get what you pay for though, and as Rorsch says I wouldn't expect the tools to do "All day every day" although reading online it seems that some of the "pro" tools have trouble with that!
My neighbour is a one man builder and handyman. He dropped in one day and saw me using one of Lidl's tools. He said he bought one of their SDS drills as a "distress buy" when his professional quality drill packed up during a job he was doing nearby, and he happened to call into Lidl to get something to eat on the way to replace it. He said he thought he'd chance it at the price as he hadn't got much more to do on a particular job, and a replacement for the proper tool meant a 30 mile round drive. Worth it to him to get the job finished that day. He was still using it several months later. Comment: "At that price it's been a good tool, and I'll bin it when it breaks"
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Job and Knock »

Lucky man to be able to use 230 volt tools. Many of us pro tradies have to use 110 volt stuff - no option but to divvy up the ponies, there.
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Dave54 »

I don't know for sure, but I expect he's doing mostly smaller stuff, house maintenance and so on.

30+ years ago, working in the steel industry, I don't know how many times we would have to tell contractors that they couldn't bring 240V (I should say 230V now) tools on site, and that there was no provision for supplying anything apart from 110V for power tools.
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by BillyGoat »

BillyGoat wrote:What are you wanting to do?

I've got one of these: http://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-hr2470 ... 240v/29604 and I LOVE it.

Wouldn't core with it though.....

BG
Just to add to my comment above, I actually used it to core two 50mm holes this weekend and it managed it without any problems at all. It's even got a clutch that works VERY well. Wouldn't want to do it all the time though. The bricks were from the 1930's and VERY weathered.

As it done that so easily, I done a 102mm core too......new bricks, that have holes in - it minced it and didn't even catch once.

Very good drill, just a shame it didn't come with an SDS to chuck adaptor, as it would have been handy a few times.

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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by davemcdavidson »

That's not good news at all! Dangerous how they can sell stuff like that!
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by sx_turbo »

I know he thread is old, but these tools do still come up for sale regularly.

I wouldn't bother with this drill, hot my old man one just as a cheapy to be used once in a while which it duly did, however it only worked for 5 of those handful times.

The power doesn't feel as advertised (comparing with my Makita which is the same power), not problem it was doing what we were asking of it. Then it just randomly died, due to the wires breaking internally.

No problem, tried to take it back as it had 2 years of its 3ywar warranty left unfortunately I couldn't find my receipt so wouldn't exchange it even though it had a build date and parkside is a Lidl brand.

Tried to repair it, but after a handful of uses the wires broke again so decided to bin it and get the titan from Screwfix.

Between me and my dad we normally try and get decent brand tools as a rule, however sometimes when buying a tool you know you won't be using all that often a budget tool does come in handy.
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Job and Knock »

Rorschach wrote:The 2kg relates to the Impact weight, not the weight of the drill itself.
Impact strength is always stated in Joules (legal requirement?) - the weight class, at least for Makita, Bosch and Metabo drills actually does refer to the weight of the drill, although "2kg class" actually means 2.0 to 2.99kg and so on. So a Bosch Pro GBH2-24D weighs a healthy 2.85kg (according to Bosch's technical manual) and can drills iup to 24mm in diameter whereas the Bosch Pro GBH3-28DRE weighs in at 3.6kg and can drive a 28mm cutter

Weight of an SDS drill becomes significant depending on how you use it. Used at floor level or up tpo about waist height most people can handle a 5 or 6 kg drill - going up to above shoulder height and an 8kg drill becomes a real PIA (and tiring) to handle and even 4 or 5kg drills can quickly become tiring to use
BillyGoat wrote:Just to add to my comment above, I actually used it to core two 50mm holes this weekend and it managed it without any problems at all. It's even got a clutch that works VERY well. Wouldn't want to do it all the time though. The bricks were from the 1930's and VERY weathered.
Where they have clutches, SDS drills are generally rated for core drilling up to about 50 or 60mm. Above that, though, you are into unknown territory - maybe you'll be lucky, maybe not...
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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by dewaltdisney »

You really should use a clutch drive drill for core drilling. I used to borrow one from my pal when needed and it was a big and heavy. The clutch saved me a couple of times as the core drill caught and it immediately disconnected saving my wrists. You do not see them advertised now and the last I saw was a Perles which I think is Dewalt now. J&K will know.


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Re: Lidl SDS drill

Post by Job and Knock »

dewaltdisney wrote:You do not see them advertised now and the last I saw was a Perles which I think :welcomeuhm: is Dewalt now. J&K will know.
Perles (originally a Swiss firm, but now in Slovenia) actually make some tools for deWalt. I know that they produce/have produced the DW613, DW615, DW621, DW622, DW624 and DW625 plunge routers (all ex-Elu designs, sort-of, and all previously manufactured in Italy by Felisatti - before they and Freud tools were taken-over by Russian firm Inter Skol). The two oddballs in that line up are the DW613 (originally designed by Elu for Black & Decker as the SR100 - in reality it was a repackaged MOF96) and the DW615 (originally made for AEG as a copy of the Elu MOF96, but now has replaced it as DW dropped the original MOF96 design when the killed-off the Elu brand in 1999). Thing is, they're a bit like Timex in that they'll make tools for anyone, as well as having their own designs, so your core drill may well have started life as an Elu, or it might be an original Perles design, but they still make core drills. UK distribution seems to have stopped somewhere about 2007 or so
"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

"I too will something make, And joy in the making" - Robert Bridges, 1844~1930

"Success is 99% failure" - Soichiro Honda
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