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So, literally...can I get

Posted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:41 pm
by Have Brush Will Travel
Yeah, people who pepper their conversations with these and other buzz words, phrases and Americanisms!!

Starting a sentence with an out of context 'so' what colour do you want on the walls?...'so, :angryfire: :angryfire: we were thinking off....

'I was literally drinking my tea when I had an idea'...Literally drinking it eh?...as opposed to not drinking it?? :scratch:

'Can I get?' :angryfire: :angryfire: ..no you can 'have'

'Theres a whole bunch of cars down there'...bunch?..are they hanging off a tree?

'Reach out to customer services'...reach out???...'contact' is the word they are looking for

:wtf:

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 10:46 am
by dewaltdisney
I cringe too on these speech affectations. I have to guard against saying 'at the end of the day' which I noticed I was saying too much. I also self answer by adding 'Isn't it' after something I have said. I think we all have things in our speech patterns and it is hard to get yourself out of it. I hate the 'C' word, that is Community and bandied about as if it is real. I hate it when that is trotted out as I have never come across a true community. It is all b*llocks, there might be a couple of well meaning meddlers in an area but most people keep themselves to themselves.

DWD

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:07 am
by Bob225
At the end of the day...………………………………………………..comes night

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:28 am
by kellys_eye
So, these things annoy :mrgreen: but I recall Suzy Dent (8out0f10catsdoesCountdown) also decrying those that used the 'so' word to start a sentence then immediately did it herself (multiple times!) to very much amusement of the audience!

I have a (sort of) aversion to even the words 'yes' and 'no' in conversation - potentially derived from that radio/TV game where you had to avoid saying it as an answer to any question (can't recall the name of the quiz show). As an example, if I'm asked "would you like a cup of tea" the answer would be "that would be very nice, thank you" or somesuch. Not that I avoid the yes/no answer all the time of course.... but it's sort of ingrained in me now.

So, yes, at the end of the day that's literally the truth.

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:41 pm
by boxedin
The rising intonation at the end of every sentence is another one.

Politicians telling you to Look (even when they are on radio) to emphasize something usually really unimportant (sometimes combined with the power stance)

People who say Do you know what ? and then go on to express their usually negative feelings about something.

Similarly People who say Do you want me to tell you something? you then say no, and they still tell you

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:03 pm
by Have Brush Will Travel
boxedin wrote:The rising intonation at the end of every sentence is another one.

Politicians telling you to Look (even when they are on radio) to emphasize something usually really unimportant (sometimes combined with the power stance)

People who say Do you know what ? and then go on to express their usually negative feelings about something.

Similarly People who say Do you want me to tell you something? you then say no, and they still tell you
oh yeah...ending a statement like its a question! :angryfire:

And 'look'...it smarts of arrogance..

I remember my Dad taking me to work with him during my last summer holidays before I started work proper..he said when people say hello say 'pleased to me you'...so I did, when I met the bosses..then he introduced me to a fella in the machine shop who nodded..I said 'alright'...my ol man done his nut with me, saying 'alright??...alright?...of course he's alright!!!..he's alive isnt he?..looks healthy!!!...roll on 42 years and I'm having a go at my trainees for saying 'wassapnin' after I say good morning! lol

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 1:19 am
by chrrris
The misuse of "literally" really hits a nerve with me too. It's so common that I think lots of people no longer have any idea what it even means. "I was so bored, I was literally climbing the walls", "He's literally got two left feet", "This song literally makes me sick". No you weren't, no he hasn't, and no it doesn't.

No doubt I've got lots of bad linguistic habits that I'm not self-aware of, and I try not to let stuff like that annoy me when I hear it. I inevitably fail though :-)

I don't follow Formula 1 any more, but when I did, about 6 or 7 years ago, nearly every single F1 driver had a habit of using "For sure" as punctuation during interviews. "For sure, it going to be a tough race for us. And, for sure, tyre selection will be important..." I suppose, for many of the drivers, English isn't their first language and they probably just heard others saying it and assimilated it. It got right on my wick, though. Literally! :hiding:

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:17 am
by boxedin
"I remember my Dad taking me to work with him during my last summer holidays before I started work proper..he said when people say hello say 'pleased to me you'...so I did, when I met the bosses..then he introduced me to a fella in the machine shop who nodded..I said 'alright'...my ol man done his nut with me, saying 'alright??...alright?...of course he's alright!!!..he's alive isnt he?..looks healthy!!!...roll on 42 years and I'm having a go at my trainees for saying 'wassapnin' after I say good morning! lol"

My late father coming from yorkshire when asked if he was "alright" used to reply with the saying "six and two thirds" a numerical representation of the reply "fair to middlin", or "notsa bad". He had a background in engineering and production planning, I think that had something to do with it

I used to work around, well paid consultants the type that got 1sts and were employed by the big six. At all times, no matter how stressed, they were always well mannered and polite (probably learned from an early age and drilled into them at induction), it distinguished them from their competition, there is definately a financial worth in being polite (without servility) as a competence its not as some think a sign of weakness.

Re: So, literally...can I get

Posted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:11 pm
by Grendel
I'm torn on this one to a degree. On one hand there are many aspects of speech that I find irksome. "Like" seems to be used almost as punctuation for teenagers theses days for instance. Management speak irritates me as does text speak "LO m8 CU tomoz" although that could be because to me it just slows everything down as I try to understand it.
On the other hand speech evolves . If we were to transport someone from 1000 years ago to today he probably would complain about how we speak . Our speech has changed quite a bit in the past , for example the great vowel shift , https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift
I have a "dual language " book of Chaucer's Canterbury tales. It isn't actually two languages , just Middle English and modern English . The Middle English is difficult to read unless one reads it in a Black Country accent. .