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Markc
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Post by Markc »

Thanks everyone. Much appreciated.
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Razor
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Post by Razor »

Whilst I remember one amazing point in the Festools favour is that they were doing a scheme where if it gets stolen whilst in warranty, (3 years) you could pay £100 for a new replacement. Would be worth anyone whose interested checking if they still do it. They was around 5 months ago when I bought my extractor
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fin
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Post by fin »

festool had that scheme when i got all my stuff good few years back.

as for the blades. ripping a door for example if i put a brand new festool 48t blade in and tried to rip a oak door it would struggle (this is in one pass) it would leave burn marks etc etc. put in a lesser tooth count blade and it flies through. can be just say a 28t blade.

same craic for worktops. i was on a job a while back and the kitchen fitter was complaining about his cutting oak worktops with his 48t blade. next job i done cutting oak worktops i got a lesser count blade and it absolutely flew through. again 28t blade and again all the blades were new.

its deffo worth having a selection of different blades anyway to get the most out of the machines
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Job and Knock
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Post by Job and Knock »

I've done this job wit both a Festool TS55 and a Makita DSP600 cordless on tracks. For chipboard core or plywood core doors I generally use a 48 tooth blade - proper all wood doors cutbegter with a 28 tooth blade. That said I have cut doors with my mickey mouse Makita DHS680 165mm brushless cordless saw, a batten and a couple of clamps on quite a few occasions. A bit slower than using a track saw, but do you really need to make that sort of expenditure for the few doors you will do? I'd say the main thing is to have a decent blade with the right number of teeth for the job and a saw with enough power.

As a joiner I personally can't see much advantage in having an undercut saw - they are expensive, you need to finish the cut off with a pull saw and you can't neaten the edge by running a block plane over it whilst the door is still hanging (I like to finish my bottom edges with a 1 to 2mm chamfer especially if it is veneeted and the csrpet is thick) - I just take the door off and plonk it on a couple of (folding) trestles to do my cuts and trimming. Hell, I even use a planer on the odd occasion.
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Post by oz0707 »

And i remember the days of measuring 2mm less, straight edge stanley, scoring, then cutting at right size with straightedge and circle saw. (as i'm sure anyone over 30 does)
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Post by Job and Knock »

To the OP - if you do decide to go with a professional saw there is nothing wrong with the Makita SP6000. It lacks some of the fit and finish of the Festool (TS55) or Mafell (MT55cc), together with a couple of features (like the quick blade lock/release of the Festool or the quick blade change of the MT55cc), but it is 95% of either IMHO. I was/am a long term TS55 user, but in the last couple of years I've used my cordless Makita DSP600 (effectively a cordless SP6000) for many days, in fact a lot more often than the corded Fedtool. OK, the dust extraction isn't quite as good (but it ain't bad), it isn't as nicely finished as a Festool, it has a clunkier blade change mechanism, etc ' but it works and it works well. It also has a nifty feature (also found on the corded model) which allows you to make a scribing cut on veneered boards before making a main cut - reduces splintering of the surface veneers. The downside, of course, is that it will bust your budget. SP6000 saws are currently running at about £270 with another £50 for a guide rail
"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

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"The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.” - Bertrand Russell from The Triumph of Stupidity", 1933
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Post by Razor »

Or the Bosch is good for a budget buy. 90% the performance of a Mafell but just over half the price

I went for the Mafell mostly because it makes almost no dust with the proper extractor and I'm expecting it to last forever


Or until it gets nicked.............
As always help on here is free, however if you think you have saved a decent sum of money why not click the link to find out about the charity we're currently supporting? A couple of quid makes a real difference.

donnas-dream-house-charity-t52110.html
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