Excel Plunge Saw

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Graeme from Tod
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Excel Plunge Saw

Post by Graeme from Tod »

I've been told I should get a track saw. I don't actually need one at the moment but I can forsee circumstances where it might be very useful. My thinking is that I'd wait until I could justify getting a really good one ( prob Makita ) with a long enough set of rails to reliably cut a stock sheet of ply longways.

However, I must admit I'm slightly intrigued by this

https://www.tools4trade.co.uk/excel-165 ... -240v.html

Have any of you got any experience of Excel tools? ( esp track saws )
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big-all
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Excel Plunge Saw

Post by big-all »

tools 4 have been plugging excel recently so either a new to them or own brand range so cant help but suspect a new range so no feed back but just a guess :dunno:
we are all ------------------still learning
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ayjay
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Post by ayjay »

Graeme from Tod wrote:
Mon Aug 24, 2020 3:50 pm
I've been told I should get a track saw. I don't actually need one at the moment but I can forsee circumstances where it might be very useful. My thinking is that I'd wait until I could justify getting a really good one ( prob Makita ) with a long enough set of rails to reliably cut a stock sheet of ply longways.
If you already have a circular saw, it's perfectly simple to cut a sheet of ply straight by clamping a straightedge on top and running the saw along it, the only difference from a track saw is where you place the straightedge: you'll need to make allowance for the distance from the edge of the saw to the appropriate side of the blade (once you've established those figures, write them on the saw with a sharpie).
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sammy.se
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Post by sammy.se »

Looks like that Excel doesn't come with a track? That will add to the cost.
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Post by Rorschach »

If going with an off brand tool I can recommend the Parkside tracksaw from Lidl, it's very good and very cheap.
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Post by robgul »

Rorschach wrote:
Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:30 pm
If going with an off brand tool I can recommend the Parkside tracksaw from Lidl, it's very good and very cheap.
or the McAllister from Screwfix for £99 - with 2 x rails that connect together
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Post by Graeme from Tod »

ayjay wrote:
Mon Aug 24, 2020 4:56 pm
If you already have a circular saw, it's perfectly simple to cut a sheet of ply straight by clamping a straightedge on top and running the saw along it, the only difference from a track saw is where you place the straightedge: you'll need to make allowance for the distance from the edge of the saw to the appropriate side of the blade (once you've established those figures, write them on the saw with a sharpie).
I have a circular saw which I use with either a Parkside clamp-on straightedge or a stock sheet length guide I made myself which the saw blade runs flush with. These work fine but I can't help thinking that a track saw would be more convenient if I was doing a lot of cuts. The plunge action might be helpful as well.
Graeme from Tod
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Post by Graeme from Tod »

sammy.se wrote:
Mon Aug 24, 2020 6:00 pm
Looks like that Excel doesn't come with a track? That will add to the cost.
Yes I know. One of the things that interested me about the Excel was that you could get nice long 1.5m tracks for it:

https://www.tools4trade.co.uk/accessori ... e-saw.html

I think having to fit together the very short sections of track available for some of the lower end track saws would probably wind me up. I'd feel sorted with a couple of 1.5m sections.
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Post by ahfix »

This Excel looks like a generic clone similar to the draper / titan / workzone / parkside.

My suggestion if you are not in a hurry is watch for the lidl / aldi offers and pick one up then. I paid extra (via the manufacture) for extra tracks so now I have one permanently setup at 2.1m length. I think I paid less than £40 for 4 x 700mm tracks delivered DHL from Germany.

ah
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Post by Rorschach »

For small jobs I run my parkside on it's supplied tracks. For longer cuts I bought a Festool 1.4m track on offer, this is the track i use the most I reckon. For really long cuts I can add the tracks together so I have 4 lengths available to me, 700, 1400, 2100 and 2800mm. Admittedly the 4 pieces joined together is unwieldy and not going to be as accurate as a single 2800 track but it will get the job and it good enough for my needs.
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Graeme from Tod (Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:36 am)
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Post by robgul »

ahfix wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 6:01 am
This Excel looks like a generic clone similar to the draper / titan / workzone / parkside.

My suggestion if you are not in a hurry is watch for the lidl / aldi offers and pick one up then. I paid extra (via the manufacture) for extra tracks so now I have one permanently setup at 2.1m length. I think I paid less than £40 for 4 x 700mm tracks delivered DHL from Germany.

ah
Which manufacturer was that for the extra tracks please - and any other details appreciated. Thanks.

Before I had my track saw (McAllister) I used an ancient B&D Pro circular saw with an Axminster board clamp/straight-edge as a guide rail - as suggested, mark the blade to edge plate distance and it works . . .but not as good as the track saw for the quality/break out on the cut.
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Post by dewaltdisney »

I suppose it depends on how often you need to cut up 8 by 4 boards. I use my table saw with additional rests provided by my workmates to act as feed on and feed off supports. I have, on occasion, used my circular saw with a batten guide, as Ayjay recommends, just giving a small hand saw cut at the end to prevent the breakout. I can see that a cordless track saw is a must for someone working out of the workshop so I would say evaluate your need and whether it is a tool that you will have a use for. A table saw is a better acquisition if you have space as you can build a sled for crosscuts and it is so versatile. Even the cheap £100 ones do most jobs.

DWD
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Graeme from Tod (Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:36 am)
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Graeme from Tod
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Post by Graeme from Tod »

dewaltdisney wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 9:06 am
I suppose it depends on how often you need to cut up 8 by 4 boards. I use my table saw with additional rests provided by my workmates to act as feed on and feed off supports. I have, on occasion, used my circular saw with a batten guide, as Ayjay recommends, just giving a small hand saw cut at the end to prevent the breakout. I can see that a cordless track saw is a must for someone working out of the workshop so I would say evaluate your need and whether it is a tool that you will have a use for. A table saw is a better acquisition if you have space as you can build a sled for crosscuts and it is so versatile. Even the cheap £100 ones do most jobs.

DWD
Thanks for the tip about the handsaw cut.

I don't spend a huge amount of time cutting sheet materials but when I do it's often long lengths up to stock sheet sizes. I use my circular saw ( with guide ) for wider / heavier long lengths & table saw for skinnier / lighter long lengths. I'm quite happy with the table saw for cutting shorter pieces of sheet stuff. We're thinking about taking on some projects that might involve more cutting of ply etc so I'm starting to look at track saws.
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