Masonry help. Which bit

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redkoatz
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by redkoatz »

Drilling with my cordless dewalt priced at 99.99 I am very unhappy.
I can see from the specs it's 1500 rpm.

I have drilled into 3 kinds of brick, which was slow, but not excessively slow.
The first brick had orange powder coming out. Seemed a bit too slow.
The next brick had black powder come out and that was the easiest to drill.
Thirdly there's this white kind of substance which is almost impossible to drill and deposits barely any powder whatsoever.
I presume this is some kind of filler for damaged walls? maybe a resin idk?
It's worth noting that All 3 kinds of bricks I've come across during my project seemed to have a thin layer of this white substance, but once through that thin layer, the orange or black underneath is a piece of cake.
The third type of hole I drilled had white all the way in (60mm)
I'm not exaggerating to say it took Hours to drill and several battery recharges.

OK on to my request for advice.
I've decided to skip cordless and sold it on ebay. My next Corded drill (I'm thinking of getting) has a Lot more power even though it's actually CHEAPER.
With 3000 rpm for example. On the other hand, what kind of bit should I use? I see there's a "diamond tipped bit" which is silver and has a blue spiral stripe running on the bit, which is advertised as "multi purpose" maybe it's better for whatever the white substance is?
On the other hand there's also much more expensive diamond bits.

I know that SDS are definitely better for masonry and one of the ratings to look at is bpm which is how many times per minute the tool will go in and out. I know these can be used for chiselling etc, but I really want a multi purpose drill because I have a diverse set of needs.

1. Am I wrong to not get an sds? Will the corded one be sufficient with the right bit?

2. If the answer above is yes. Which bit is the best for when I come across this wire substance which takes forever and a day to drill.

I'm trying to get a drill at least 1200 watt which should be about 5 amps. And a keyed chuck which I've heard is better than keyless.
If I am persuaded to go sds it'll be a good 1500w one that's also at least passable as a word drill. Although I'm not optimistic with 800rpm or there about on the sds drills I've looked at.


Thanks in advance
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Dave54
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by Dave54 »

What was the cordless?
Was it a hammer drill.
Personally, I'd have kept the cordless. They're useful for all sorts. Should drill into "normal" building materials reasonably well with a good quality, sharp bit I'd have thought.
Corded SDS though for me for masonry every time.
Much better performance in masonry.
Always ready to go. Mine doesn't get that much use these days, and the batteries don't like sitting idle.
OchAye
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by OchAye »

It might have been helpful, if you said where are those bricks e.g. house walls, when we may take a guess as to the white powder (plaster?). Also how wide and how deep are the holes you try to drill.

For drill bits for the battery powered drill(s) I have I have used Bosch multiconstruction and I had no problems (red brick on the outside, black inside) in my house. Trying to drill on location 8&10mm wide holes x70mm deep on stone the battery drills could not manage, so I used the mains SDS. For that I have bought a relatively cheap set of Makita drill bits, but if I need something not included in the set then I buy Heller..

We are only guessing at what you have used or trying to do.
fin
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by fin »

sds drill for drilling holes in masonry. wether its battery or corded will do the job.

if you go for a cheap budget brand so less than £50 usually they are pretty horrendous but will in general do the job. be heavy. probably drill a 7mm hole with a 5mm but. but will do the job.

any sds drill from makita, dewalt, bosch, hitachi, festool, hilti etc etc etc will be night and day better than the cheapo £50 or less machines.

my own current sds is a dewalt 18v and i use it for all kinds.

standard cordless drill drivers are a waste of time in hammer mode in comparison to any of the listed makes above.
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etaf
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by etaf »

i would second the recommendation for the bosch drills, they are so much better than other drills, i had to use hammer with my cheap dewalt cordless drill, but NOT with these bits, and drilled a few holes into masonry between 5&7mm
christmas I also got a dewalt corded sds drill, decided on corded as i wont be using it for small holes, but i have to drill some 20 off 12mm holes through a single brick wall to replace a fence when the weather changes.

i got the dewalt sds with a standard chuck as well as the sds chuck, as in the past i have wanted to drill large holes in wood and thought this would be more versatile, also Impact Rate: 0-5,540/bpm 2.8 Joules. https://www.ffx.co.uk/tools/product/Dew ... ange-Chuck
and need to take a load of cladding off a garage, looking forward to using this in the spring/summer
Simple DIYer
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redkoatz
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by redkoatz »

The cordless drill was a dewalt.
Which I *definitely * will not be getting another cordless. No way.
They run out of charge fast, the power definitely goes down as the charge goes down. I definitely see that the first 50% of charge is running twice as fast as the second 50%
Also your money is paying for the charger and batteries which *will* gradually deteriorate over time and need to be replaced.

Corded drills are cheaper and more powerful in every way, including a ampage.
I see no bonus in terms of power and cost in cordless what so ever. The only "benefit" is not having to have a cable connected, which I won't be using the drill in the wilderness and it will always be around the house, so the negative in power and cost is by no shape way or form substituted by the "advantage" of no cord.

My only decision here lies in
1. sds or regular and whether sds can drill wood ok or a normal drill is OK with masonry
2. The appropriate bit for the substance.

BTW the wall is on the interior of the house and it's a solid wall.
BTW 2 I'm not convinced of the value of brand name drills (cost/performance) compared to cheap brands.

If anyone here has a non branded sds / regular drill would love to hear from your experiences.
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by London mike 61 »

I have two sds corded drills, one of them is a Lidl 5kg parkside one that has done quite a bit of chiselling and some heavy drilling into concrete posts and although it is on the heavy side it would be good enough for drilling into wood and I think I paid £40 for it.

https://images.app.goo.gl/Hos3j8WK4V56ETfw6

My other one is a green Bosch one that I’ve drilled into concrete lintels with ease and again would drill into wood. I bought it from homebase on special offer for £50 instead of £100 some time back.

https://images.app.goo.gl/EW7S9wxj1LKouz888

Mike
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redkoatz
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by redkoatz »

London mike 61 wrote:
Wed Feb 26, 2020 5:21 pm
I have two sds corded drills, one of them is a Lidl 5kg parkside one that has done quite a bit of chiselling and some heavy drilling into concrete posts and although it is on the heavy side it would be good enough for drilling into wood and I think I paid £40 for it.

<span class="skimlinks-unlinked">https://images.app.goo.gl/Hos3j8WK4V56ETfw6</span>

My other one is a green Bosch one that I’ve drilled into concrete lintels with ease and again would drill into wood. I bought it from homebase on special offer for £50 instead of £100 some time back.

<span class="skimlinks-unlinked">https://images.app.goo.gl/EW7S9wxj1LKouz888</span>

Mike
Good post thanks.
The Parkside was 60 and the bosch 160 though.
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Masonry help. Which bit

Post by OchAye »

Just some thoughts and admittedly I have not read carefully the previous discussion (I got other stuff to worry about).

Here is my use of power tools.
Drill/driver(s) for mainly screwdriving (I am told DC motors are happier to run at low RPM compared to AC i.e. mains motors). As it happens I have a pair of hitachi drill drivers, one for screwing the second can be used for pilot holes in wood. If they can do the job and are convenient then use them with hammer for masonry holes. They can also be used for drilling into steel as you can go at a low speed.

For SDS (mains powered) I got a relatively light weight (2.4 joules ????) Makita but I chose it because it came with a normal chuck as well as the SDS chuck. So that could be used with non SDS drill bits (and it can do hammer only, rotation only, hammer and rotation). I have a demolition ALDI SDS job (it did what I wanted from it), and a matching hitachi to the drill/drivers impact driver which i have used once and I am not sure it will be used again (WTF everyone wants an impact driver ... big girl's blouses :lol: :lol: :lol: ).

Get the basic tools you need to do the majority of jobs. Don't choose battery because it is fashionable, but because it may be best suited to some jobs (e.g. slow turning motors). If at some point you have something more difficult to do consider buying the right tools for it (I am thinking of hand tools). If you do the job yourself, your own labour will pay for the tool and you have the pleasure of doing something yourself and having something to take to bed and stroke ... who can resist an nice shiny new tool).

Not sure if there is much helpful advice above but like I said I am preoccupied.
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