Maximum Hanging Weight From A Ceiling Joist

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bigal2019
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Maximum Hanging Weight From A Ceiling Joist

Post by bigal2019 » Thu Dec 19, 2019 6:19 pm

Hello all :hello2:

My fiancée has decided she’d like an indoor hanging chair, like this one: https: //www.wayfair. co. uk/garden/pdx/bay-isle-home-vasilla-swing-chair-tiny1253.html

It comes with a welded eye hook that simply screws into the ceiling joist. I’m confident enough to actually install the hook into the joist, but before I do I want to be certain either of us sitting on the chair (although I can’t see me ever using it!) won’t bring the ceiling down!

Our house is a 1920s ex-council house. The joists are 2x4s, spanning 12’. There is 400mm between each joist, and from what I can see from lifting the insulation up, they’re not braced. The loft is above the ceiling, and AFAIK the joists form part of the roof structure. The chair will be hung roughly in the middle of the span.

I think she’s only likely to use it for an hour at a time, probably three or four times a week - until the novelty wears off and we fall out because I’ve wasted my money! :lol: :lol: ::b

As they are currently, will the joists be strong enough to support this use?

Thank you! :-)
dewaltdisney
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Maximum Hanging Weight From A Ceiling Joist

Post by dewaltdisney » Thu Dec 19, 2019 6:31 pm

This is a spot point loading and the force is the weight of the person and chair on a four by two timber spread over 12 foot. Added to this is the fatigue motion is created by swinging and bounce. Without doing any calculations you can imagine the stresses increasing dramatically by the weight of the person concerned.

How can you spread the load? It is less towards the edges of the span and sistering a thick joist or a steel would cost a bomb but even that would have a certain degree of flex. Unfortunately you need a short span and a thick beam.

DWD
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