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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2018 12:46 pm 
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Hello, I hope you are all well <3

I live in a very old sold wall granite building (approx. 100 year old). The building has 2 floors and a small loft. The bottom floor is owned by a property leasing company and me and the wife are on the 2nd floor.

The building has a solid granite wall exterior, a gap (which runs from sides of walls into loft), and then plaster boarded interior walls. We have no central heating. As you can imagine, the flat is cold.

The loft had badly laid fibreglass insulation. This had been compromised and ruined over the years as holes in the roof had allowed water to penetrate. There was also numerous birds that had at one point made the loft their home.
The roof has now been patched up to fix the leaks. As condensation was an issue in the flat a kitchen and bathroom extractor fan had been fitted. The ducting runs to 2 newly installed pipes int he roof. The loft roof also has roofing nails protruding through the ceiling every couple of inches.


Theres not much in the way of ventilation in the loft. I presume where in the past heat had been escaping into the badly insulted loft in abundance this is what has caused numerous condensation problems in the loft as well as the flat. There are numerous salt build up areas on the roof of the loft.

I have spent a few weeks cleaning up the main area of the loft as well as the awkward skeilings. I have safely disposed of the old ruined fibreglass and am now ready to insulate although I need help ironing out a few reservations first.

Apologies to all as I have a few questions. Hope you don't mind I number them. Im just trying not to forget key questions.

1) - As I am going to insulate the loft, and I dont want the heat to continue to escape into the loft, after I draughtproof the loft (i have also remedied external repointing and etc of walls) should I lay down a vapour barrier between the joists in the loft before laying down insulation on top of it?

2) - Also, as I cannot reach down into the sloped areas of the loft sides (skeilings) to fit normal insulation, should I lay down foil backed, rigid insulation boards as I cannot reach down that far to install vapour barrio sheet.

3) - Is it definitely a Vapour barrior I would need and not a Damp Proof Membrane?

4) - Should I cut individual sections of VP for in between joists or just one big continuous sheet across all the joists and neatly stapled to fit?

5)- I have noticed that where the roofer installed 2 ventilation pipes through the roof for ducting, one of the pipes protrudes into the loft to such a degree where it is almost touching the floor of the loft. Obviously this would make it difficult for me to fit insulation under this ducting pipe. Is it possible for me to trim the pipe a couple of inches to allow insulation underneath or should I just insulate around it?


Thank you for your patience and help.

Kind regards,
Teddy
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:13 pm 
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Ive been working for an insulation firm for 15 years, if it was me doing it I would Definitely use ridged board insulation on skielings, I wouldn't bother fitting a vapour barrier


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 12:02 pm 
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[quote="teddy_amok"]Hello, As you can imagine, the flat is cold. The loft had badly laid fibreglass insulation. This had been compromised and ruined over the years as holes in the roof had allowed water to penetrate. The roof has now been patched up to fix the leaks. As condensation was an issue in the flat a kitchen and bathroom extractor fan had been fitted. Theres not much in the way of ventilation in the loft. I presume where in the past heat had been escaping into the badly insulted loft in abundance this is what has caused numerous condensation problems in the loft as well as the flat. There are numerous salt build up areas on the roof of the loft. I have safely disposed of the old ruined fibreglass and am now ready to insulate although I need help ironing out a few reservations first.

(1) We need to know is there any roofing felt under the roof tiles.

(2) Insulating your loft floor will not do any good, other than you might enjoy the PLACEBO effect. This being you thinking after loft insulation been laid: "Doesn't it look good, cleaner, warmer and more cosy". But: Insulation wise of doubtful value. Contrary to what you might think birds never ever nest in it, showing by doing so an high level of intelligence and good judgement. Twigs and hay-straw of a certain selected type are what birds nest in.

(3) Your problem is cold air intake in an old house what that was never warm from day 1. These homes were built on the idea that in winter you would huddle around a blazing fire, and keep there day after day until the sun shone bright.


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