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 Post subject: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:35 pm 
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I'm new to planers and I was wondering how you plane a big piece of wood that's wider then my 82mm planer without getting grooves in the wood?


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:40 pm 
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I'm fairly sure that I've seen various solutions to this 'problem' on YouTube - but 'fraid I can't give you a URL.


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:27 pm 
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I tried there but couldn't see anything


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:23 pm 
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It is hard to do it with an electric planer as it is taking too much off each pass. You really cannot beat a hand plane for this job. I have a thicknesser that planes wide boards but you still have to touch up after to take out the slight ripples.

DWD


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2017 8:34 pm 
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My own feeling is that you can't do it all with an electric planer - not even a Festool! You can get pretty close by using the electric planer set to a very fine cut (i.e. 0.3mm or so) on the final passes and moving it very slowly - but you won't get perfection. In fact even with hand tools some scraping (hardwoods) or sanding (softwoods) is generally required to achieve and acceptable surface. This is especially the case with power planers as it is impossible to camber the blades to avoid the "tracking" which sharp edged blades always produce.

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 8:35 am 
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Steveohim wrote:
I tried there but couldn't see anything


That may be 'coz lots in that area appear under the US name for the machines = a jointer.
However, DWD and J&K are spot on that further processing will be necessary


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 7:53 pm 
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AAA.Handy.Man wrote:
That may be 'coz lots in that area appear under the US name for the machines = a jointer

Technically the terms "jointer", "overhand planer" or "planer" are all interchangeable in the UK, although manufacturers tend to favour the word "planer" here these days. Oddly in the fifties and early sixties if you used the word "planer" many trade wood machinists would assume that you were referring to a "panel planer" (or in modern UK parlance, a "thicknesser")

Just thought I'd throw that in to muddy the waters :roll: :wink:

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:30 pm 
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If you want to do it by hand then the best process is probably an electric planer to quickly remove material followed by a jack planer or jointer plane and a pair of winding sticks to keep it all level. I have levelled large bits of wood by hand, it's not easy work but can be done with patience.



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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 10:18 pm 
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Maybe another thing worth mentioning is that timber is often only used "single sided". To explain: this week I needed to cut-in a replacement piece of plain MDF skirting (i.e. just plain, flat board) to match the rest of the skirting in a particular part of the project. The architect's spec. calls for 180mm high x 15mm thick skirting board. We only had 18mm MDF in stock, and for the sake of 2.2 metres of skirting I wasn't going to wait 3 days for a delivery and splurge dosh on a sheet of material that we otherwise might not use (we are nearing project end). My solution was to rip a 2.44m long length of 18mm MDF, sand the top (visible) edge with a sanding board, then to take a series of slow 1.5mm deep p[asses from the back side of the board - 3 passes to get the width, repeated once to give me a 15mm thick board. The back was a bit rough, but once it was cut to length and grip-filled and pinned in place it looked fine. The rough bit was at the back against the wall and permanently out of site. A typical site solution, BTW

Perhaps one question to ask yourself is whether or not that surface needs to be perfect. Most of the time, at least in installation work, it doesn't need to be

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : AAA.Handy.Man
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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 10:22 pm 
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Many thanks to you both for:
# adding yet more to my bank of knowledge - and glossary
# info and techniques which will be invaluable once I get my gurt bandsaw working and cutting my stock of groove & separate tongue, floorboards in half (Length-ways) ... :thumbright:

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Perhaps one question to ask yourself is whether or not that surface needs to be perfect. Most of the time, at least in installation work, it doesn't need to be

:lol:
So 'bleedin' obvious that Hammer-chewers such as I miss it completely and insist on 'mirror' finishes on both sides ... :thumbleft:


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 Post subject: Re: Using a planer
PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 6:52 pm 
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If you ever work on stuff built prior to about 1870 you may well find that floor boards, skirtings, etc are faced on only one side (a practice which only really died out in the late 1960s or so in smaller firms in some parts of the country). The older the house the more likely this is to occur - why labouriously hand plane the back of a skirting or a floorboard which will never be seen? The practice seems to have died out with the more widespread adoption of four sided planers by (larger) joinery firms and timber merchants from the 1870s onwards.

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"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!



For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : AAA.Handy.Man
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