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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:15 pm 
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Should I cover the entire floor in engineered wood, then put the units on top;
or fit the units to the concrete floor, and then fit the floor around the units?

I've had to different pieces of advice.

Cover whole floor: give a better finish
Going around the units: cheaper

It'll only be a few quid saved, so I'm not worried about cost -- results are more important.
A key thing for me is whether the units are likely to have any 'bounce' or flex once the engineered wood has underlay underneath it?

Looking for what is common practice and the pros/cons.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:29 pm 
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One thought: if you go around the units it'll be easier to change the flooring in the future, conversely, if you change the kitchen in the future ........

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:38 pm 
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In terms of cost you'd generally install the units then run the flooring up to them because it's cheaper and the plinths will hide the un-floored areas. Downsides: you will need to put in build-ups for any built-ins which need to it directly on the floor (e.g. washer, dishwasher, etc), it obviously won't work with plinthless kitchens (where you are meant to see the feet) and in the event of a flood it'll take somewhat longer to clean-out the "reservoirs" beneath the units

If you install the floor first then install the units it'll certainly cost more. It'll only look better until you install the units and plinths. After that, who will ever see?

I can't see "bounce" being a problem, at least not with the denser underlays. Once your units are loaded up with crockery, pans, tins, etc and when combined with the substantial weight of a worktop, sink, etc there really isn't going to be much movement

Personally I'd reduce my costs by installing the units first. One thing I would do, though, is to get and keep to one side an extra half pack or so of laminate to cover any unforseen accidental damage you may need to repair in the future (same goes for floor and wall tiling, too)

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:59 pm 
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Thanks for the advice; seems good.

I'm leaning towards doing the units first then. It will certainly help to avoid damaging the wood floor when fitting the units, oven etc.. As a bonus it also helps me to order the rest of things a little easier; I have some extra timber work needs doing around the floor edges (a step down into the kitchen, and external door)


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:52 pm 
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its easier to fit the floor then fit the units,especially if it's a small kitchen.
If it's wooden flooring or even laminate then the units shouldn't really sit directly on the new floor. I've had to cut holes in a new floor before with a holesaw to allow the unit legs to sit directly on the subfloor so as to allow for expansion and contraction(and keep the flooring warranty valid)


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