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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2018 5:55 pm 
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I have replaced a couple of wooden window sills in the past and not had too much trouble and they look fine. The problem I have each time is getting the old one out. Any tips? Or is there a good video? Thanks


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 9:30 pm 
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After much effort, I have removed the sill. Anyone know where I can get a new hardwood one? Thank you.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 9:45 pm 
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Timber merchant?

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 9:52 pm 
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zaffy wrote:
After much effort, I have removed the sill. Anyone know where I can get a new hardwood one?

As there's no such thing as a standard angle it's normal to get a section machined-up by either a decent timber yard (one with a wood machining shop) or by a joiner's shop. You may find if dealing with someone local that they already have a cutter block with the correct angle for your window which will make it a lot easier (they may even have some pre-machined profile on the shelf)

Sorry for not responding earlier - if it had been posted (or moved to) the Carpentry/Joinery Forum I'd have responded much, much earlier. Just saying. I'm sure I'm not alone in thinking that

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 10:57 pm 
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7 degree splay is fairly normal
iff you have a section take it with you and it may be cheaper buying a complete exterior frame and just use the cill

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2018 1:44 am 
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big-all wrote:
7 degree splay is fairly normal

Depends where you are in the UK, B-A. Round here (wet and windy Pennines) 9° or so is probably more common (sometimes much more on mullioned windows), whereas I've worked on jobs in the Eastern Counties a few times (many years ago) where about 5° was the norm (in any case very, very shallow). Whitehill actually make spindle blocks in 5°, 7° and 9° which tends me to think that there's no "standard" angle and that it depends on how wet your part of the country is

You're unlikely to get exterior windows ready-made unless the house is quite modern because for windows. unlike doors, there really are no standard sizes (at least not on private builds). On sash windows and the like the bigger timber merchants have always stocked a selection of profiles common to their own areas I've found

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2018 8:55 am 
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sorry i read door cill :lol: :lol: :dunno:
so yes impossible :cb

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2018 10:15 am 
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I've made a fair few cills on site largely because it's more cost effective than having a special milled and having to wait for it. Unless several are being done at once it's by far the easiest method.
As to the original question it often depends upon the state of disrepair or extent of rot. In a fairly high percentage of cill replacements it's the front or projecting part that has deteriorated and that can be chopped off , basically hammer and chisel job , and replaced. This can also be done with the glass in place. If the rot extends further back then I tend to find that rot will also have affected the jambs and mullions. On heritage work this will generally involve splicing to keep as much of the window original as possible and I've done my fair share of that. In domestic work or anything not heritage it may very well be more cost efffective to replace the whole window. How one approaches any repair depends largely on how the window is constructed in the first place. I find sash windows easier to replace the cills on because the boxes are made up of several pieces. Casement windows with single section jambs on the other hand can be a absolute pain to repair insitu .



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 12:15 am 
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Thanks everyone.
This is an update.
I managed to remove the cill. It took a while because I wanted to remove a reasonable size piece for the profile.
A local joiner made me one from Sapele for £80. It fits like a glove and looks good.



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 12:54 pm 
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Thanks for the update :thumbright:

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