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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 4:01 pm 
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I'm thinking of replacing my current chipboard subfloor in a few rooms with a plywood subfloor as the chipboard subfloor is making a squeaking/creaking noise. I've had a few people take a look and they all offer slightly different advice on how they would do it and I would like to see what people hear think.

What would be the best method for this to be done and what would be the best material? E.g. what type of plywood should be used and what thickness, should it be T&G plywood or does that not really matter? Is there anything I would need to check or clarify before getting this work done? I'll be putting underlay and carpet over the plywood if that makes any difference.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:31 pm 
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18 or 22mm depending on what is already in place, 22mm is probably better but really heavy if working on your own.

I personally have never seen T&G ply, if using normal sheets you'll need to support the edges where the boards meet. You can install a nogging between the joists, making sure it's level otherwise you have a raised edge.

You want to stagger boards as well so the joints are not all in a line (think brick style pattern).

Pay attention to any pipes or cables that might be under the floor as you screw down the replacement boards.

ah


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm 
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Lift the old chipboard and lay new 22mm chipboard ensuring the joists are glued and all tongues are glued. Nail with ring shanks or screw and you’ll have no problems.
Poor installation is the cause of squeaking chipboard floors,not the product.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 8:16 pm 
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as above. squeaks when the board and the nails rub together.

recently laid a new floor in a full downstairs of a house all glued tongues and to the joists with expanding pu glue.

only i did a booboo...... last fecking nail i put it through a underfloor heating pipe :lol: so the last sheet had to come up


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:24 pm 
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I'm with Stevie and Fin on this one - 22mm T&G chipboard makes a good, affordable sub-floor when correctly installed. As stated above that means using 8 x 2ft (actually 2400 x 600mm) T&G chipboard flooring panels and glueing every joint after it has been "bumped" into position (for which I generally use a 14lb sledge hammer and a 4ft length of 4 x 2in CLS for the tapping block - brutal, maybe, but one or two "taps" generally does the trickk). Using these oversize "planks" is a lot easier than manhandling full sheets into position, especially if working above a void. I prefer screwing to nailing, but do use decent screws and use enough. Best stuff I've used is P5 Egger boards which I feel are better than Kronospan.

ahfix wrote:
I personally have never seen T&G ply, if using normal sheets you'll need to support the edges where the boards meet. You can install a nogging between the joists, making sure it's level otherwise you have a raised edge.

Spruce plywood sub-flooring is pretty much always T&G. It is commonly used in more public spaces where the floors can be made-up of two or three layers of plywood all glued at an angle to the layer below and all layers are glued together. Less common on domestic properties, but not completely unknown. At one time we used to edge groove 18 or 22mm hardwood plywood used for shop floors (and on posh hotels and apartments). This allowed us to glue-in hardwood loose tongues and made for a floor which didn't move in service and was less draughty. Not sure how effective putting solid strutting (correct term - noggins are in walls) is beneath joints - you generally aim to trim boards so that the ends land directly on joints and in any case properly fixed onto 400mm centre joists 22mm plywood won't move, and even 18mm is pretty good

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:47 am 
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If the floor is ok and not damp or damaged why re-place it? I would try to find if there is any pipes or wires underneath, detectors are available, and I would screw them back down, with good quality screws and the correct length, if you have to replace then do as said screw and glue, and make sure all end to end joints are over a noggin or joist. Iam not a pro but having put down 140m2 of t&g 22mm by myself :cb I know its not an easy job.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:50 am 
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Nos wrote:
I would try to find if there is any pipes or wires underneath


When you lift the boards and if you find any cables close to the surface of the joists, you can fix these to prevent future accidents: https://www.toolstation.com/shop/p20903
https://www.google.co.uk/search?safe=active&biw=1920&bih=948&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=KPmtW731FIXTsAeHgoqIAg&q=joist+cable+safe+plate&oq=joist+cable+safe+plate&gs_l=img.3...19661.20459.0.20760.6.6.0.0.0.0.108.512.5j1.6.0....0...1c.1.64.img..1.0.0....0.gITvm8JxQdo#imgrc=WrLtWBKtIiKGZM:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 2:50 pm 
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Thanks for all the feedback here. Really helpful advice and pointers.


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