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 Post subject: Can plasterboard be cut?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 10:58 pm 
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Hi I’m looking for some advice.

I have 2400mm x 1200mm (12.5mm) plasterboard sheets to put up on my ceiling. It’s the heavier soundbloc (blue) ones.

Today me and my husband tried to put them up with 2 “dead men”, and failed miserably.

Unfortunately the problem is me,I just don’t have the strength to hold it up while the dead men are put in place.

The only realistic solution we have thought of is to cut the boards. We were thinking in half or possibly even quarters.

I know this probably isn’t the ideal, but honestly in our circumstances it’s a safety issue.

We don’t have anyone who can help us and don’t really have the money to pay a professional.

I’m worried about the integrity of the boards being cut, will they be substantially weaker? More likely to to fall down? I know that the plasterboard screws have to be further in from the edge in cut edges (15mm I think ?) I also realise it will mean much more work for skimming.

Can anyone give any advice on this matter?

Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 7:59 am 
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Hire a plasterboard lift, it won't be expensive. In fact a brand new one is less than £100, the time saving of the extra skimming alone would likely pay for that and then afterwards stick it up on ebay, I see secondhand ones going for about £50ish. If you are local you might be able to buy a secondhand one for £50 and sell it again for the same money later on.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:58 am 
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Kara999 wrote:
Hi I’m looking for some advice.

I have 2400mm x 1200mm (12.5mm) plasterboard sheets to put up on my ceiling. It’s the heavier soundbloc (blue) ones.

Today me and my husband tried to put them up with 2 “dead men”, and failed miserably.

Unfortunately the problem is me,I just don’t have the strength to hold it up while the dead men are put in place.

The only realistic solution we have thought of is to cut the boards. We were thinking in half or possibly even quarters.

I know this probably isn’t the ideal, but honestly in our circumstances it’s a safety issue.

We don’t have anyone who can help us and don’t really have the money to pay a professional.

I’m worried about the integrity of the boards being cut, will they be substantially weaker? More likely to to fall down? I know that the plasterboard screws have to be further in from the edge in cut edges (15mm I think ?) I also realise it will mean much more work for skimming.

Can anyone give any advice on this matter?

Thanks in advance.


How many sheets do you want to fix? And will it be just painted or skimmed?

Cutting plasterboard doesn't make it weaker (the standard one comes in variety of sizes) as long as you use long enough drywall screws and fix every 150mm

After cutting the board cut edges can be hard to tape and fill to get a clean finish. I wouldn't go any less that half a board if that's what you had to do, you can also use a rasp to clean up and taper the edges where the cuts ends butt up against each other. https://www.screwfix.com/p/stanley-surform-block-plane/20388?tc=CT9&ds_kid=92700030952056610&ds_rl=1245250&ds_rl=1249481&ds_rl=1249796&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIl_anvebG3QIV1uR3Ch2LzA03EAQYAyABEgIdVvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CIqs6L7mxt0CFZusUQoduKEF3g

If you are really stuck here's a bonkers idea ...

Are the walls stud walls? You could fix a baton about 50/75% way up the wall running horizontal. Doesn't need to be fix hard. You use this as a ledge to place one side of the plasterboard on to take SOME of the weight (you still need to take the majority) while the dead man in set in place. If you are careful with the fixing and removing you will just have a couple of small holes to fix after.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:08 pm 
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I'm with Rorschach. Buy (or hire...) a plasterboard lift. If you buy one, you can ebay it when you're done.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Drywall-Plaster-lifter-Lifter-Construction/dp/B079P4L387/

It'll make the job a breeze.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 5:57 pm 
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:dunno: won't the lift weigh more than the plasterboard ??

@ OP is this plasterboard for upstairs or down ?

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:32 am 
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In answer to your title, no, not with wet tripe, :shock:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 9:31 am 
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Would this idea work for you
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0UHi62look


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 11:23 am 
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boxedin wrote:


Great video :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:27 am 
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wine~o wrote:
:dunno: won't the lift weigh more than the plasterboard ??

Uhhm... This is the most bizarre comment I've ever seen on here! You do understand that, to use a plasterboard lift, you don't fit the plasterboard to the hoist then physically heft the entire hoist up to ceiling level, right?

Am I missing something? :scratch:

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:18 am 
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I'm assuming he's thinking that if the plasterboard is too heavy to handle the lift would be as well especially if the job is upstairs?
Going back to the original question it should be possible to cut the board into more easily handlable pieces. There will be a lot more joints but these could always have extra noggins added .


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 6:42 pm 
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chrrris wrote:
wine~o wrote:
:dunno: won't the lift weigh more than the plasterboard ??

Uhhm... This is the most bizarre comment I've ever seen on here! You do understand that, to use a plasterboard lift, you don't fit the plasterboard to the hoist then physically heft the entire hoist up to ceiling level, right?

Am I missing something? :scratch:


Grendel wrote:
I'm assuming he's thinking that if the plasterboard is too heavy to handle the lift would be as well especially if the job is upstairs?


Exactly that.

@ OP plasterboard can be cut, you need a straight edge and a sharp stanley blade or similar, cut on the brown side. then snap the board.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:10 pm 
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wine~o wrote:
Grendel wrote:
I'm assuming he's thinking that if the plasterboard is too heavy to handle the lift would be as well especially if the job is upstairs?


Exactly that.

Heh, oh I see now. That is definitely not an issue - they come in three bolt-together bits (feet, middle bit, and the bit that holds the boards). Definitely a one - man lift. :thumbleft:

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:30 pm 
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I'm with Chrrris on this one - having humped more boards up onto ceilings than I care to think over the last 40-odd years (and put my back out a few times doing it) about a lifter is by far and away the easiest way to handle 37kg plasterboard sheets. Still hard work, but LESS of it. Always going to be a problem getting full sized boards upstairs, though....

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:00 am 
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chrrris wrote:
I'm with Rorschach. Buy (or hire...) a plasterboard lift. If you buy one, you can ebay it when you're done.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Drywall-Plaster-lifter-Lifter-Construction/dp/B079P4L387/

It'll make the job a breeze.


I purchased one of these years ago.

It saved my marriage. (Literally :) )

Seriously, it’s well worth it and you could sell it after. They hold their value.

I’ve lent mine to mates many times.


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