DIY Forum

 

Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Mon Apr 22, 2019 3:52 am


Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]




 

 


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 1:13 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2015 11:35 pm
Posts: 8
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
I’m a painter and decorator and a couple I work for have asked me to work on their garden furniture (several chairs and a table) and this is something I haven’t done before.

Is there a tool I can use to sand between gaps in the wood? Maybe some kind of drill attachment? They are loads of decorative gaps several mm or so wide and it would be WAY quicker if I can use something electric than trying to do it manually with sandpaper. I have an electric disc sander for the flat areas. I hope I can give them an all-over light sand and clean out the small amount of moss growing in places. It doesn’t seem feasible in a reasonable time to strip in all back to bare wood.

Also what is the best product to use on garden furniture that has been stained in the past? The dark stain they picked up says on the instructions it’s not suitable for use on furniture so it’ll need to be changed.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Delicious
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 8:30 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:16 am
Posts: 1844
Location: Camberley Surrey
Has thanked: 107 times
Been thanked: 308 times
Would a power washer not work?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 8:39 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 7:03 pm
Posts: 8603
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 1470 times
Would a power washer (at that close range) not damage the wood? or at least soak it?

GlynG, some times a job is best left alone, this is one of those times.

Look at it this way.

It sounds easy, but already you have found problems, and your time to do it manually will probably be more than new furniture? and not to mention if it goes wrong. I know nothing ventured nothing gained, but like I first said.........

_________________
Fret not, a forum is a collection of opinions. Above, are mine.

Which is correct? Metre or Meter? Click the link to find out more.

Working on anything electrical? have you got a multi meter? why not? Would you hit a nail with a shoe?

If gloom had a voice, it would be me. :mrgreen:

:idea1: How to post a picture on this forum Click here


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 10:49 pm 
Offline
Pro Carpenter
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:11 pm
Posts: 21099
Location: redhill surrey an auld reekie laddie
Has thanked: 709 times
Been thanked: 2041 times
i would say no good outcome
at best you will get a patchy finish with this time next year your name is mud after a wet cold winter :shock:

_________________
we are all ------------------still learning


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 7:54 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:21 pm
Posts: 9
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Hello

Depends of the timber the furniture is made from, and if its varnishednor stained?

I have used a pressure washer before, but it does raise the grain if your not careful, its best to turn the pressure right down, at first anyway, you can always increase it and try it on the underside first.

Last ones I did, I used a soft wire brush running up and down the grooves, try a scrubbing brush first, most of what sits in the grooves is debris and mould, was very fast, seemed to work well, that was for stain.

Varnish wise I use HMG and stains I use ronseal or cuprinol, depending on customers preference.

As far as the outcome not being good and your name not being good after the winter, that's not been the case for me, plenty of products available for such jobs, and as always preparation is key. In an ideal world wooden furniture shouldn't be sitting outside all winter anyway, neither should it be wrapped up, a cover with ventilation is better than nothing. All finishes age some faster than others.

Regards

Divad


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2018 6:27 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2015 7:08 pm
Posts: 1445
Has thanked: 103 times
Been thanked: 260 times
Sanding in between slats can be an absolute pain. I believe it's possible to get small cylindrical sanding attachments for tools such as dremels but in the past I have made my own by gluing sandpaper to short lengths of 1/2" hardwood dowel which will fit in the standard chuck off most drills . Use on a relatively slow speed and usual ppe.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2018 7:38 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:16 am
Posts: 1844
Location: Camberley Surrey
Has thanked: 107 times
Been thanked: 308 times
Tried a pressure washer on an old Oak chair which had layers of old varnish and dirt, it did remove but raised the grain in places!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

 

 




Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Solent plastics


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO