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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:08 pm 
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A chap not far from me is selling the above. I went to see it yesterday and it ran very smoothly. He's asking £250 for it which I think is a bit steep and I suspect he bought it cheap to sell on. I just wonder whata fair price would be and if I can still buy parts for it? I emailed them but they haven't responded.

Does anyone know who bought over Elu? (found out it was B&D)

I took a quick video on my phone yesterday but forgot to video when the motor was on.



Last edited by Argyll on Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:17 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:10 pm 
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Can someone sort outthe youtube link. Sometimes it works and then other times not :scratch:

Took out the 's' in https but still didn't work.

Sussed it. I remembered I had my vpn on :-)


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:50 pm 
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the elu stuff is class. we have a planer and a sds drill here. lasts really well.

that woulda been well expensive when it was new like. tbh id probably pay that for it.

i went to the dewalt shop in spennymoor in the summer. i bought the table saw for round about £350 ish from memory. they also had thicknessers in too.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Planer-thick ... Swl9RZ7P0h

think it was that one.

i suppose its only worth what your willing to pay for it. probably be a better machine than the new dewalts too

try www.mtmc.co.uk for spares



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:08 pm 
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Elu was a German company that, AFAIK invented the hand router.

They got taken over by the Black and Decker group, which included Dewalt. Products were branded as ELU fir a while abd finished in the blue/grey elu livery then soon after it all got rebranded Dewalt and finished in the bright yellow colour we all know today.

The original Elu routers were made in Germany and Switzerland and are much better engineered than the same router models which I guess are probably made in China.

Some parts are still available

http://www.powertoolspares.com/tool/elu ... e1/spares/

And type 2 as well.

I dont think price is too bad, Is it a 10 x 6



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:19 pm 
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Quote:
I dont think price is too bad, Is it a 10 x 6


Do you mean 10 inch x 6inch ?


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:23 pm 
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Notch whats the difference between the types 1&2?


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:25 pm 
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There's an instruction book for the 1150 here
http://bit.ly/2zPdlps
It has to be around 20 years old I'd have thought, but as said ELU made good kit, although I don't know the planer thicknesser.
Probably be better than any of the modern 250 quid offerings if it's had a reasonably easy life I'd have thought.
Again as said, not cheap when new. I've got an MOF 96E router from the late 80s. It's done a lot of work. Well over a hundred quid then IIRC.



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:33 pm 
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Dave I researched and found Elu changed name to Elumatec in 1984 so it must be at least 33yrs old. I'm pondering over it. My biggest concern is getting parts in the years to come. Yes they're available now butthey may run out at some point.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:38 pm 
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Argyll wrote:
Dave I researched and found Elu changed name to Elumatec in 1984 so it must be at least 33yrs old. I'm pondering over it. My biggest concern is getting parts in the years to come. Yes they're available now butthey may run out at some point.

The spares thing is a problem with any kit mate. :dunno:
That router of mine must have been bought '88 or '89 so they definitely selling under the ELU brand then.
I remember the rebranding as DeWalt as well, because the local tool place then had lots of that kit.
I thought that was sometime around 2000.
Could be wrong though!
Whatever, it's going to be past the first flush of youth! Bit like me!


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:15 pm 
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Notch1 wrote:
Elu was a German company that, AFAIK invented the hand router.

The world's first electric hand router was actually the Kelley, first manufactured in the USA in 1907 by George Kelley. It didn't last.

Attachment:
kelley_router_1907 001_01.jpg
kelley_router_1907 001_01.jpg [ 95.15 KiB | Viewed 818 times ]

Above: An actual Kelley router
Below: Advert for the Kelley router from 1918. The firm ceased trading in the early 1920s

Attachment:
kelley_router_1918.jpg
kelley_router_1918.jpg [ 356.17 KiB | Viewed 818 times ]


The person who did the most to make the router as we know it today was Ray L Carter in the USA who by the early 1930s had patented many features you see on the average router including: dual taper collet/collet nut arrangement, tool-less arbor locking, plunge mechanism, threaded depth adjustment, side fences, guide bushes, dovetail jig, router table insert (with split adjustable back fence, spring safety guard and a tilting device), tilting router base, freehand shaping bases, etc. By the mid-1940s his routers had sealed for life ball bearings, too. Carted sold out to Stanley in the early 1930s, but they continued to make some of Ray's designs until the 1970s. Oddly enough the only one of the patents mentioned above that Carter didn't put into production was the plunge router.

Attachment:
Carter router 1924 001-01.gif
Carter router 1924 001-01.gif [ 42.62 KiB | Viewed 812 times ]

Above: An early Carter production router from 1924
Below: Stanley-Carter fixed base router from the early 1930s. This was introduced as a DIY model aimed at home users. A first

Attachment:
Stanely-Carter router 1930s 001-01 .jp.jpg
Stanely-Carter router 1930s 001-01 .jp.jpg [ 150.47 KiB | Viewed 816 times ]


Elu should, however, be in the limelight for having introduced the world's first production plunge router, the MOF11 in 1949 - but by that time Stanley Carter and Unit Electric/Porter-Cable in the USA had probably produced more than 100,000 electric routers between them

Notch1 wrote:
They got taken over by the Black and Decker group, which included Dewalt. Products were branded as ELU fir a while abd finished in the blue/grey elu livery then soon after it all got rebranded Dewalt and finished in the bright yellow colour we all know today.

Slightly more complex than that. B&D licensed their battery technology to Elu in the early 1980s for use in a new range of cordless trade power, and seemingly at the same time took-on the Elu routers for sale (as Elu from B&D) in the USA in the form of models MOF96 and MOF177. At that time Elu were using a two-tone grey livery with orange knobs. Elu also restyled the MOF96 and that model was in turn sold outside of Germany as the B&D SR100.

Attachment:
Elu USA router late 1980s 001-01.jpg
Elu USA router late 1980s 001-01.jpg [ 77.6 KiB | Viewed 812 times ]


Eventually B&D did buy the power tool division of Eugen Lutz (Elu), but the PVCu window machinery side of the firm continued in family ownership under the Elumatic name. B&D re-organised its industrial power tool division (sopread over the USA, Canada, UK, Germany and Italy) and put a rag-bag of designs under Elu. They also rolled-into this new entity the deWalt Europe factory (making radial arm saws, small band saws, industrial chop saws, portable planer/thicknessers, etc) but, oddly not the USA end of the deWalt (industrial radial arm saws) which was sold-off as a separate entity - the Original Saw Co. The new "Elu" entity introduced the darker grey body colour with blue buttons somewhere around 1989 or 1990 at which time the portable (hand) tools were also sold in yellow/black under the revitalised "deWalt" label. Various new "Elu" designs were introduced in this period, but any new static tools were almost certainly being designed and made by the old deWalt factory in Italy. Elu certainly did re-engineer the USA industrial router range, giving it the same (superior) collet and nut systems they were using on their own German models and rebranding them "deWalt" in the main.

But the clock was ticking - the Lutz family had apparently given B&D until 1999 to change the name of the tools (and remove the "Elu" brand) - so Elu inevitably disappeared at the end of 1999 and all products by that time had been given the yellow/black livery and were branded "deWalt". Another development was where tools were made. Elu had never had enough in-house capacity to assemble tools so a lot of stuff was assembled for them, initially by Scintilla in Switzerland and later by Perles, also originally in Switzerland (I also suspect some tie-up with Virutex as several of their routers and at least one of their planers are dead ringers for models in the Elu range). During the late 1980s 0r early 1990s Scintilla apparently became fully owned by Bosch and Perles moved manufacturing to Slovenia (following the collapse of communism), so production of most of the routers was switched to Italy (Felisatti, who are now Russian-owned), most of the circular saws were replaced by a new and cheaper range developed and made in the USA, although some of the lower end models were still being made by Perles, and cordless items ended up going to B&D Germany, USA and later still to Mexican and Chinese plants.

Notch1 wrote:
The original Elu routers were made in Germany and Switzerland and are much better engineered than the same router models which I guess are probably made in China.

Some of the routers we see here are made either in Italy (DW625) or Slovenia (DW615/DW621/DW622). Quality has, however, diminished slightly

My personal take on the OPs question: yes, you can get some spares, but this will not continue, especially as the machine probably dates from the 1987 to 1997 period. Sooner or later you may have to source parts elsewhere. Things like drive belts, bearings, switch gear, etc shouldn't be much of an issue, but bespoke components such as tables or fences will be long out of production/stock, so you'll be on your own. If you are reasonably mechanically "ept" you should be OK, and if the worst comes to the worst you can always break it and sell the parts on eBay

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Last edited by Job and Knock on Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:27 pm 
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Argyll wrote:
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I dont think price is too bad, Is it a 10 x 6


Do you mean 10 inch x 6inch ?


Yes!


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:27 pm 
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Argyll wrote:
Notch whats the difference between the types 1&2?


I dont know unfortunately


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:50 pm 
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as an aside
if tools are the old elu under the dewalt name they have the same part numbers for both elu and dewalt

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2017 11:52 am 
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Hi Argyll, it is a good machine but it is not cheap and there are risks in buying it.

This little story about my thicknesser might give you some thought. About ten years back I bought a Fox thicknesser identical to this http://www.axminster.co.uk/jet-jwp-12-b ... ser-100412. After an absolute hammering over a few years the motor burned out. I spent a lot of time trying to source a new unit and I spotted that this machine was the same as mine and managed to get a replacement motor from Axminster for around £100. It was a bit fiddly to fit as the drive chains were hard to tension to slip the joint link in but I fabricated a stretcher and it worked a treat.

Now I have a jointer as well so between my table saw, jointer and thicknesser I have been able to prepare sawn boards into PAR stock for jobs. That machine is good as you have a nice wide jointer face and an adequate width thicknesser. The worry is will anything break as it will be hard to source parts as I found it hard to find bits for a current machine. I think £250 is too much and I would offer £175 to agree at £200. The motor looks like the sort you could take to a little electrical shop to get rewound if necessary, my motor was unserviceable.

Good luck.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2017 4:49 pm 
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Thanks DW, I thought £200 was a fair price so I'll call him now with an offer of £175 :thumbright:


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