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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 8:03 pm 
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Hi,
I have a house that has every ceiling covered with artex, the older version containing white asbestos.

My plan is to pva over, followed by two coats of multifinish.
I'll then need to drill holes for light fittings and downlights in the hall.

With a mask, damping down area, disposable suit, is this safe enough? I'm thinking the skim coat will seal in a lot of dust from the drilling. Removal professionally is not an realistic option at the moment due to the cost.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 5:09 pm 
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My advise would be don't!
I have read that for small holes like a rawplug fixing squirting a blob of shaving foam on the wall and drilling through that may contain the dust, not sure how well it works though and for a large holesaw I suspect you would just end up flinging asbestos contaminated shaving foam around the room! :roll:



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:58 pm 
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Any hoover used for asbestos should be H rated (about £600 a pop!) asbstos will pass through a normal filter and be spread around the house.



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:15 pm 
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Not just cancer, but asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos), diffuse pleural thickening, pleural plaques, pleural effusion, rounded atelectasis and malignant mesothelioma.


From someone who has worked with asbestos for many years, who continues to work with the risk of coming in contact with asbestos and who has to hold a current UKATA Asbestos Awareness certificate could I please urge anyone who read the last post TO STRONGLY DISREGARD THE ADVICE GIVEN BY THIS POSTER ABOUT USING A DOMESTIC VACUUM CLEANER TO COLLECT ASBESTOS-LADEN MATERIALS.

The advice given about sealing it in and wearing protective clothing (which needs to be an over-hair "romper suite" with gloves and footwear protection sealed at the cuffs - we use gaffer tape) is perfectly sensible - if you are removing something like cement asbestos sheeting. With regards to the dust mask, it must be a well-fitted mask with appropriate filtration - in other words not a cheap paper dust mask, but an appropriate detachable filter mask. A major headache, though, is how to decontaminate both the work area and the clothing, as well as how to dispose of contaminated materials/clothing afterwards. But the worst possible thing that you can do is to use a domestic vacuum cleaner, or even an industrial one (other than possibly one certified as class-H), to vacuum-up whilst you handle the stuff. This is because asbestos fibres are so small that an individual fibre, at a diameter of around 3 μm (much smaller than a human hair), cannot be resolved by the human eye, and equally the filtration in all but highly specialised industrial (class-H) vacuums simply means that a vacuum cleaner sucks up the dust at point of production (or maybe 90% of it as vacuums are rarely 100% efficient), then sprays it out the back of the vacuum cleaner (it passes straight through the filter) putting it in the air potentially for hours, and allowing it to spread ALL OVER YOUR HOUSE! BTW, asbestos isn't a cumulative killer as implied - any and every contact with it is as dangerous as the last one - and it can be 15 to 60 years before you find out that you have an issue. Once diagnosed it’s often too late to do anything.

The standard advice when dealing with products which contain asbestos is, if possible, not to disturb them AT ALL, and wherever possible to encapsulate them by sealing-in, over boarding, etc. In that state they will remain safe for a very long time. So in the case of the OP, I have to ask why it is so necessary to drill these holes? Is there no other way to approach this?

OK, so people who work in the trades are most at risk of exposure; asbestos kills 20 tradespeople in the UK every week, including 4 plumbers 6 electricians and 8 joiners (source: HSE), making it the single biggest cause of work-related deaths.

Sorry to bang on about this, but I am in a position where I am often responsible for the safety of others but also a close friend of mine (actually a painter and decorator) died a few years back of mesothelioma - the suspected cause being the tendency of painters to dust Artex ceilings with their dusting brushes (and so put loose asbestos fibres into the air they breathed). The fact that he smoked only made him more susceptible, I'm afraid

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:06 pm 
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I've removed a couple of posts which contained incorrect information here.
Please try to ensure that when you make posts giving advice about safety issues such as asbestos you fully understand the risks and proper safety measures.
Thanks.



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