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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:34 pm 
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Ok so I'm insulating my garage floor going with 50mm height in joists and 50mm celotex, with some Egger Tongue and Grooved 4 Sides Moisture Resistant (P5) 18mm x 2400mm x 600mm flooring over the top
iv been looking at visqueen membrane but seems very expensive so found a NDC Blue Damp Proof Membrane its £37 at b&q says its Tear, puncture and impact resistance and used in concrete floors, will this be ok under my wood frame as a dpm?

thanks for any help


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:25 pm 
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The B&Q membrane should be fine.
Why put a timber frame in at all?
You could lay the insulation direct over the DPM and the flooring over the insulation as a "Floating Floor" with the all the T&G Joints glued as you lay it. This would save you some money and is good standard practice.

davyp1



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:27 am 
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davyp1 wrote:
The B&Q membrane should be fine.
Why put a timber frame in at all?
You could lay the insulation direct over the DPM and the flooring over the insulation as a "Floating Floor" with the all the T&G Joints glued as you lay it. This would save you some money and is good standard practice.

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I just feel maybe the floor will shift around through time if I do a floating floor? I have no experience with floating floors though so don't really know, I will be leaving a gap right around floor to keep it of the outside wall, would you recommend taking the damp proof membrane up the walls a bit past the wall dpm?

thanks



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:11 am 
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graemeuk wrote:
davyp1 wrote:
The B&Q membrane should be fine.
Why put a timber frame in at all?
You could lay the insulation direct over the DPM and the flooring over the insulation as a "Floating Floor" with the all the T&G Joints glued as you lay it. This would save you some money and is good standard practice.

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I just feel maybe the floor will shift around through time if I do a floating floor? I have no experience with floating floors though so don't really know, I will be leaving a gap right around floor to keep it of the outside wall, would you recommend taking the damp proof membrane up the walls a bit past the wall dpm?

thanks


We were installing floating floors in six storey flats 30 years ago using 60mm insulation topped by one layer of 12.5mm plasterboard & 18mm thick T&g flooring sheets, This was to combat mainly noise problems. We left a 10mm perimeter margin and I do not recollect a single complaint relative to movement of the floor!
Yes perhaps take the DPM up the wall sufficiently to retain it with a thin lat & plugs and screws just above the DPC.
A good glue to use on the joints is:-
http://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/d4-adhesive

davyp1



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 2:09 pm 
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davyp1 wrote:
graemeuk wrote:
davyp1 wrote:
The B&Q membrane should be fine.
Why put a timber frame in at all?
You could lay the insulation direct over the DPM and the flooring over the insulation as a "Floating Floor" with the all the T&G Joints glued as you lay it. This would save you some money and is good standard practice.

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I just feel maybe the floor will shift around through time if I do a floating floor? I have no experience with floating floors though so don't really know, I will be leaving a gap right around floor to keep it of the outside wall, would you recommend taking the damp proof membrane up the walls a bit past the wall dpm?

thanks


We were installing floating floors in six storey flats 30 years ago using 60mm insulation topped by one layer of 12.5mm plasterboard & 18mm thick T&g flooring sheets, This was to combat mainly noise problems. We left a 10mm perimeter margin and I do not recollect a single complaint relative to movement of the floor!
Yes perhaps take the DPM up the wall sufficiently to retain it with a thin lat & plugs and screws just above the DPC.
A good glue to use on the joints is:-
http://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/d4-adhesive

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I like that idea of taking the DPM up the wall and using a thin lat & plugs and screws just above the DPC
would you recommend using Egger Tongue and Grooved 4 Sides Moisture Resistant (P5) 18mm x 2400mm x 600mm flooring ? iv noticed others iv found one at b&q P5 Tongue & Groove Chipboard Floor Panel (L)2400mm (W)600mm (T)22mm says this is also moisture resistant and more of a smooth board, not really sure what p5 means


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:38 pm 
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graemeuk wrote:
davyp1 wrote:
graemeuk wrote:
davyp1 wrote:
The B&Q membrane should be fine.
Why put a timber frame in at all?
You could lay the insulation direct over the DPM and the flooring over the insulation as a "Floating Floor" with the all the T&G Joints glued as you lay it. This would save you some money and is good standard practice.

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I just feel maybe the floor will shift around through time if I do a floating floor? I have no experience with floating floors though so don't really know, I will be leaving a gap right around floor to keep it of the outside wall, would you recommend taking the damp proof membrane up the walls a bit past the wall dpm?

thanks


We were installing floating floors in six storey flats 30 years ago using 60mm insulation topped by one layer of 12.5mm plasterboard & 18mm thick T&g flooring sheets, This was to combat mainly noise problems. We left a 10mm perimeter margin and I do not recollect a single complaint relative to movement of the floor!
Yes perhaps take the DPM up the wall sufficiently to retain it with a thin lat & plugs and screws just above the DPC.
A good glue to use on the joints is:-
http://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/d4-adhesive

davyp1


thanks davyp1 I like that idea of taking the DPM up the wall and using a thin lat & plugs and screws just above the DPC
would you recommend using Egger Tongue and Grooved 4 Sides Moisture Resistant (P5) 18mm x 2400mm x 600mm flooring ? iv noticed others iv found one at b&q P5 Tongue & Groove Chipboard Floor Panel (L)2400mm (W)600mm (T)22mm says this is also moisture resistant and more of a smooth board, not really sure what p5 means


I am not sure what P5 means either!
You could use the 18mm x 2400 x 600mm Flooring Egger T&G on all four sides; but shop around for best price. You do not need 22mm thick and B&Q are not renowned for being cheap!
When you lay the boards, remember to bond them (start with half a board then a full board etc. then the next line starts with a full brd)

davyp1


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:46 pm 
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P5 is moisture resistant and is the standard board to use now.
I'd go 50mm insulation and forget the timber. I'd also use 22mm flooring for all the extra it's going to cost and use a d4 polyurethane foaming glue as well,it goes off really quickly unlike pva wood glue.
Go to a timber merchant for the materials as well,you'll normally get free delivery and it'll be cheaper than b and poo.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 3:41 pm 
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Thanks guys some really helpful info iv received here.



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