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PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 3:39 pm 
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I decided to spruce up some shelves, which had previously been painted with white oil based paint, with Dulux Pure Brilliant White QuickDry Satinwood paint, which is water based. I firstly sanded the shelves, washed and dried them and then gave them 2 coats of the Dulux. They look fine but if anything is placed on them it leaves a mark or even takes a bit of the paint off when it's removed. Is there any solution to this?


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 4:35 pm 
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It needs to cure. :salute: That can take 3 to 4 weeks. The curing process is separate from the drying process, as a paint can be touch-dry but quite fragile.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:42 am 
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Thanks for that. I took all the shelves down to paint them and I think it was a while before I put them back up, a few weeks I think.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 5:09 am 
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Probably would be better with something like Bedec Aqua Advanced Satin as it's designed to be tougher. Some of the water-based offerings can mark, if there's no polyurethane in the mix. Any WB coating that has it, or the word 'enamel' in its description will be tougher and harder wearing. :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:12 am 
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dynamod wrote:
Probably would be better with something like Bedec Aqua Advanced Satin as it's designed to be tougher. Some of the water-based offerings can mark, if there's no polyurethane in the mix. Any WB coating that has it, or the word 'enamel' in its description will be tougher and harder wearing. :thumbright:


Thanks for that info.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 4:54 pm 
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Most water and oil based products achieve their full chemical cure time in around 7-10 days, obviously this is depends on how heavy the application is. I ask people to think of it as a rice pudding, it forms a skin on the surface, but remains soft underneath for this full cure time.

There is also a secondary answer in that the first stage of the drying process is the evaporation, this leaves all the parts very loosely bound. The second part, is the coalescence. This is where the co-solvent melts all the parts together, providing structural strength. (this is for water based products)

The only thing I would have changed from your description, is the use of a suitable primer/undercoat, they provide better inter-coat adhesion. My suggestion would be a hybrid undercoat, like Johnstone's Aqua. These types of coatings adhere to traditional oil/solvent based coatings brilliantly well.



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:54 pm 
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jmt wrote:
Most water and oil based products achieve their full chemical cure time in around 7-10 days, obviously this is depends on how heavy the application is. I ask people to think of it as a rice pudding, it forms a skin on the surface, but remains soft underneath for this full cure time.

There is also a secondary answer in that the first stage of the drying process is the evaporation, this leaves all the parts very loosely bound. The second part, is the coalescence. This is where the co-solvent melts all the parts together, providing structural strength. (this is for water based products)

The only thing I would have changed from your description, is the use of a suitable primer/undercoat, they provide better inter-coat adhesion. My suggestion would be a hybrid undercoat, like Johnstone's Aqua. These types of coatings adhere to traditional oil/solvent based coatings brilliantly well.


Very helpful info, thanks mate.


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