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 Post subject: fix 100mm posts to wall
PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 12:06 pm 
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Hi All. I asked a similar related question recently so apologies if im repeating myself.
I'm constructing a fence/cladding a breeze block wall in my patio area 4.4m long * 2.2m/1.6m high (half of the wall closest to the house/half further away) running perpendicular to the house. As there are pillars(?) at each end of the wall I want to bring the pack the posts out so that when I add the fence boards/cladding (horizontally) I can extend them and hide the pillars at the same time.
I ordered some 100mm x 100mm posts at the weekend with additional 100mmx20mm boards that I've screwed on the back so that I get the 120mm depth I need to be flush with the pillars. I underestimated how thick and heavy 100mm x 100mm posts would be so am having doubts about whether or bolting them into the wall will be safe enough. I was advised to use 3 10x160mm nylon frame fixings in each of the four posts.
Can anyone confirm if this should be adequate or a better way of doing it? I'm told I should avoid resting them on the floor so that they don't get wet but it seems there'd be much less weight if they were touching the ground.
I don't think the wind should ever be that much of an issue as there is only 0.6m x ~2m that will be exposed and my neighbours conservatory is about 50cm away on one side so the fence will only really be exposed to the wind from one direction, plus I plan on leaving gaps between the boards so it's not like one solid fence panel.

I'm now thinking of placing a few bricks under each post to raise them off the ground and then maybe add a few more fixings into each one. The fixings will be countersunk into the posts by 3cm so that the first 9cm is in the post and the last 7cm in the wall. Is there a guide to how far in the wall they should go as the blocks aren't that thick?

Any advice will be appreciated as im slightly worried ill come home one day to find it's all fallen over


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 2:29 pm 
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Has to be more stable on a firm flooring, end grain treated for rot; you might look at this posting (sorry) whilst awaiting other suggestions, as the link to screwfix no longer works but they do M12 300mm threaded rods code 52679, you will have to cut and have the nut washer (extras) external not rebated/contersunk.
https://tinyurl.com/n85s6ur


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 2:54 pm 
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so the nylon frame fixings aren't good enough?
will resting the posts on bricks be okay?


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 6:12 pm 
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They should be good if your brickwork is sound and holes not near the brick ends, note standard bricks are about 58mm wide.
Bit unconventional but no harm if you don't want the post touching your patio but there is a chance of water congregating there however if the posts are pressure treated, then they will take a lot of wetting.


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 6:48 pm 
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An alternative is to use allthread to both fix the post and keep it up a tad. I've done it myself . The allthread into the wall is pretty much the same as any other fixing except that it's held by resin and the nuts can be easily sunk into the face. On the bottom the method is to drill a hole in the end grain a little smaller than the all thread then wind it into the hole. After it's in put a nut and washer onto it. This bolt sticking out of the post now goes into a corresponding hole , resin again . It perhaps depends on how much water sits in the area and also how much weight the post is to carry.


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 7:25 pm 
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aeromech3 wrote:
They should be good if your brickwork is sound and holes not near the brick ends, note standard bricks are about 58mm wide.
Bit unconventional but no harm if you don't want the post touching your patio but there is a chance of water congregating there however if the posts are pressure treated, then they will take a lot of wetting.

Correction standard brick width about 92mm.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:11 pm 
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aeromech3 wrote:
Has to be more stable on a firm flooring, end grain treated for rot; you might look at this posting (sorry) whilst awaiting other suggestions, as the link to screwfix no longer works but they do M12 300mm threaded rods code 52679, you will have to cut and have the nut washer (extras) external not rebated/contersunk.
https://tinyurl.com/n85s6ur


someone else suggested using threaded rod and going all the way through with a nut on either end. Why can't it be rebated (at least on one side) though as I was hoping to cover the posts up with the boards?
the walls seem fairly solid but hard to tell really?

and do you mean that sitting them on bricks wouldn't be stable? I would have thought they wouldn't move at all if they're supporting the weight but having them raised up a tad would be better than straight on the patio??


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 7:18 pm 
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Sinking the nut below the surface of the post is pretty standard stuff. Drill or router a hole large enough to take a socket or ring spanner and deep enough for the nut and washer plus a little extra. I've had to do it and then set in a piece of timber to "hide" it all afterwards too although that obviously necessitates a deeper hole.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 11:17 pm 
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if i can get access to the other side of the wall is it worth going all the way through or should half way(?) into the wall be fine?
if i can avoid it i'd prefer not to as it's down the side of my neighbours conservatory so will be a bit of a pain getting in there


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