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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 11:18 pm 
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Maybe answered elsewhere, but did some searching and can't find the answer I need or any clues, so here goes.

BACKGROUND

I live on a hill sharing private water main with 5 houses. I am last but one from the top. On Weekends and especially in the summer the mains water flow just drops. Typically we can have no or very little water coming into the house. This has been getting worse over the years .... You can fill a glass of water but have to wait a while, but a dish washer will time out. At night it all goes back to normal. In the week its fine ... even peak times.

To solve this problem I put a big break tank in the loft with a salamander pump to feed the house. This solution works well until the tank is emptied, but this is rare. This has been in situ probably 6 or 7 years, I left the kitchen on the mains supply.

However recently we have been getting no water for many hours.

SOLUTION
So, my though is to put a second tank into my loft, purely for kitchen drinking water and the dish washer. The dish washer is no issue, but it worries me about drinking water.

I have done some reading, this URL looks good

https://www.wras.co.uk/downloads/public_area/publications/general/info_note__cold_water_service_storage_cisterns.pdf/

My thinking is maybe a 75 -120 litre break tank tank with a pump, the tank based on the above regulations with a high tunr over of water, sealed etc ....

REQUEST FOR HELP
What do you think ?
Will this work ?
Any alternatives ?
Any problems ?

Replacing or investing in the share water main is not an option... not everyone is suffering yet and some neighbours hate each other ... !!

Thanks for your help and support and thoughts in advance ....

Cheers


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:09 am 
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DIYbloke wrote:
Any alternatives ?

http://www.stuart-turner.co.uk/products/flomate/mains-boost-extra-80/
Or similar (stuart turner do a range of these mains boost pumps).

Or you can complain to the supplier if you're getting less than 9L/minute, I think. They should sort it out at their expense unless you have some sort of private supply arrangement.

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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:44 am 
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Location/country.

Where is the bore hole and plant in relation to the houses and what maintenance provisions are in place.

First mistake is the storage should be as low as possible. a Cellar or ground floor shed or plant room even a garage space to keep the kit in.

Best tanks are Dewey waters say 1-2000Ltrs. http://www.deweywaters.co.uk/

Then you want a good quality twin pump set or similar 3-4 Bar would be average.

Everything can then be in the same space and distributed around the house at mains pressure.

Back to the original it sounds as though there may be a problem with the existing but you need everyone in it together for a common solution, (likely something in the deeds giving you access)


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 1:21 am 
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Slightly small set-up in Kensington. 3bar pump set.


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 11:41 am 
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Thanks all for the quick feed back.

These solutions are probably a bit too big for me, i only need cold water to the kitchen tap, that would be safe to drink.

So just to be crystal clear, it is OK to use a storage tank for cold water for drinking, as long as it sealed, and has a high turnover rate ??

I only have about 600mm loft space for a tank so a pressure cylinder will not really work as it will be too small in volume. I can only get a plastic tank into the space....

Cheers


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:53 pm 
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I thought there was a legal right to be connected to the mains water system? Would it be that expensive to lay your own supply pipe to the mains??

DWD

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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:58 pm 
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I think you missed the point, the higher they go the slower they fill.

The tanks I linked to can go anywhere even outside. but the kit needs to be undercover and protected.

The house is served at a set pressure from the pumps, you need two pumps, one in service and one changeover.

Yes you can store potable water, and you can add filters etc if wanted, but generally you want a fast turnover which is where the whole house pump comes in.


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:59 pm 
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dewaltdisney wrote:
I thought there was a legal right to be connected to the mains water system? Would it be that expensive to lay your own supply pipe to the mains??

DWD


They would if you ask but depending on distance you may need to be loaded to cover the cost.


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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 1:26 pm 
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Oh, I see. I suppose you could hire a digger, dig a trench and lay your own pipe and just have the water company do the last bit. There could be wayleave issues to overcome crossing the land.

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