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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:34 pm 
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I came across this article over Christmas Although it is American, many of the practices and concerns it mentions as being in use in the USA also apply over this side of the pond. Makes you think twice about using the stuff

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 1:13 pm 
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I wondered where Wind Gatherer had got to :lol:

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 3:25 pm 
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Think twice? Not at all.

Anyone with reasonable grey matter between their ears would easily spot wood that is unsuited to reuse and many of the issues they point out in that article are either plain common sense or exaggerated for effect.

Of course there will always be those 'out there' that are so thick they need leading by the hand from start to finish but for the vast majority of DIYers I reckon they are treating their readership with a bit of disrespect if they assume they don't know the difference between suitable and unsuitable pallet remains....

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 3:00 pm 
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Yes I came across a similar piece a while ago and reposted it on a different forum. To be honest I tend to look for the HT markings on any pallets I use or burn and won't touch treated ones for the fire at least.
Interesting that the article talks about the potential hazards of those treated pallets but then goes on to say that they are being increasingly ground up to use a garden mulch which seems at the least counter intuitive.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 6:31 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
I came across this article over Christmas Although it is American, many of the practices and concerns it mentions as being in use in the USA also apply over this side of the pond. Makes you think twice about using the stuff

:-) ...., I followed your link, and also found this:

Canadian pallets are the safest

Apparently, pallets from Canada are the safest, since most of them are only pressure- and heat-treated (marked with "HT"), as opposed to being fumigated with the neurotoxin and carcinogen methyl bromide (marked with "MB"), to kill off invasive species like pine beetles.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 6:02 pm 
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kellys_eye wrote:
Think twice? Not at all.

Anyone with reasonable grey matter between their ears would easily spot wood that is unsuited to reuse and many of the issues they point out in that article are either plain common sense or exaggerated for effect.

Of course there will always be those 'out there' that are so thick they need leading by the hand from start to finish but for the vast majority of DIYers I reckon they are treating their readership with a bit of disrespect if they assume they don't know the difference between suitable and unsuitable pallet remains....


You would be surprised how many people out there have not got a clue about wood treatments, carcinogens and all that stuff. Our village has a Facebook group in which a local company that works with wood often posts notices about offering free wood to local people (broken down pallets, leftovers, etc) for use in their logburners or diy projects. I did ask if it was treated with chemicals and when the answer was yes for some of it I warned people about the carginogens that could be potentially releassed by burning it or using it for projects. You wouldnt believe the amount of people that accussed me of scaremongering and that dismissed it. :shock:


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