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PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:56 pm 
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whilst i agree in trade use corded are better as they are faster and more efficient
in the average diy set up the tools will be seldom used towards there maximum capacity
so the advantage off flexibility off use around the house and garden without the need for trailing cables preventing the use in damp conditions or working when you have the power off whilst working in a room
in my 12x10ft shed i have 11 or 12 double sockets spread fairly evenly around the roof line but still prefer battery tools where possible as i tend to do more outside on my heavy duty workbench / garden bench seating area
over the last few years i have given away my bosch mains jigsaw my dewalt dw62 circ saw and bxd circ saw and several mains drills [bosch/b&d ]because they simply whernt used as my 18v dewalt covered most
i used to have 24v bosch blue jig saw chop saw circ saw and hammer drill for the really heavy stuff but gave them away to a good home as the only regular use was the drill for a hole saw :scratch:
yes my tools have a fairly easy life as 90% off my work is furniture 'bed 'storage' van racking based so dont really need heavy duty capacity but a mains router chop saw table saw band saw router table planer thicknesser belt sander half sheet sander bicky joiner and a few otheres are fairly essential but most if not all tasks can be fully done with battery power with little or no adaption to design or construction method

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 11:23 am 
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I was thinking the other way, B-A. I have to use cordless in some situations because mains power (110 volt in my case) simply can't be run to me, or wouldbe a major hassle (e.g. fitting 24 sets of kick and finger plates across all 6 floors of a building). I don't see a DIYer having to put up with such stuff, whilsy for outdoor use an extension cable with an RCD plug has to be the way to go.

In terms of bang per buck corded tools are far, far better. Spend £100 on a cordless 18 volt circular saw and what do you get? A 165mm saw without batteries which requires special thin blades (which you can struggle to find, especially at low cost - mine are £16 to £22 a pop) with half the life of a conventional blade. Against that an equivalent DIY corded saw will come in at circa £55 to £65 with a 190mm trade saw at £90 to £120. Same goes for jigsaws, but even more so (£120+ for a cordless, £40 and up for a DIY corded, £90 and up for a trade corded)

If you have the money and the need, though, e.g. refurbing a boat in the middle of nowhere, then cordless is great. Just not sure about recommending it as a starting kit

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 5:16 pm 
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Belated thanks for the responses. I went Makita in the end. Cordless combi ... and the other stuff corded.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 5:58 pm 
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Bit late to this but I'd have to concur and say that for pretty much most jobs corded are the better option. Plenty of power and no batteries to die over time. I have drills that are probably as old as I am , a big old Wolf for instance that wouldn't look out of place in a Flash Gordon film but which still works perfectly .Personally I only have a couple of cordless drills and one small circular saw which gets very little use. All three are dewalt 14.4 v running on nicads although that's only because they're not broken ( well the one drill doesn't work in reverse) and still do the job. If I were going for new I'd go for or the reasons stated by others .


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:41 pm 
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Just noticed I've replied to a thread nearly a year and a half old , doh.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:42 pm 
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probably reactivated by a now removed spammer so not your fault :lol: :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:36 pm 
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Handy Trev wrote:
I went Makita in the end. Cordless combi ... and the other stuff corded.

Thanks for letting us know. I find it dificult to give an answer on this at times because lok almost eeryone I am biased towards my own kit (Makita 18v Li-Ion in the main). It's maybe worth pointing out that for lighter DIY work 12 volt can be enough (I used 10.6 and 12 volt trade kit in the past when that was all there was) and to prove the point a former colleague has now foregone all his 18 volt stuff and bought 12 volt stuff instead

+edited 9.6 to 10.6v to save confusion by mod big all+

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:56 pm 
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as an aside
lions are accepted as 3.6-3.7v per cell hence the 3.6/7.2/10.8/14.4/18/21.6/25.2 etc
the cells when charged will be around 20% over volts on a normal charge with a bit more on high charge
so a claim off 12v or 20v is the exact same batteries as 10.8 or 18v but on the higher edge of the average normal operating level so nill extra performance or power just chosing a different point on the battery volt/amps curve to measure the capacity and voltage

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 7:59 am 
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I "downgraded" my cordless kit to 10.8v and I honestly couldn't be happier. I am not doing heavy trade work of course, so runtimes and power are not such a big concern, although I have not noticed a significant lack of either.
I would much rather have something that is perfectly adequate and a pleasure to use 90% of the time and then pull out a corded tool when needed.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:57 am 
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i am a tool tart and i tend to extend rather than downgrade :lol:

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 7:00 pm 
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Well to really confuse things the Ebauer 18v drill driver and impact driver are 1.1 and 1.2 kg. I had a quick go with them and they seem excellent in feel and design as well as being extremely compact. Personally I have a newish Mak 18v and a small AEG 12v (great for decorating). I would have just stuck with the AEG which is a pretty great bit of kit but went for the Mak when I had a couple of hundred decking screws to put in and enjoyed the extra power and speed of the 18v.

The standards go up every year on these tools. The new Ebauers are like chalk and cheese when compared to the old designs.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:49 am 
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18v all the way all though I tend to veer towards DeWalt but I have a couple of Makita stuff as well as Bosch blue.

I have a Bosch blue 36v drill that I use daily. I've had it 3 years and it's never failed me.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:27 pm 
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Puma wrote:

The standards go up every year on these tools. The new Ebauers are like chalk and cheese when compared to the old designs.



Good to know, old ones where sh*t
I have s few things and got dumped as although still working, bits started falling off them. There drill bits aren't great either


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