DIY Forum

 

Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Sun Aug 19, 2018 5:08 pm
Visit Hilti


Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]




 

 


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:18 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
…that is the question!

The interior of my small 6ft x 4ft shed at present...

Image

I don't plan on heating the shed but it is essential that the humidity level remains very low, a dessicant de-humidifier will be purchased on completion of the project.

The interior will be clad in plywood and all joins/gaps sealed with frame sealer. However should I insulate in between the studs, floor and roof beforehand? I'm thinking not since there's no plans to heat the area.

Thanks :)


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on DeliciousShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:38 am 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:51 pm
Posts: 8109
Location: Essex
Has thanked: 577 times
Been thanked: 1689 times
May I suggest that, if you can lift it, to slide some damp course membrane under the floor supports to protect from moisture. See https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Damp-Pr ... m/p/133880

As for insulation I think it is only any use if you heat it and the insulation retains the heat. The ambient air will settle to the temperature and humidity it decides.

DWD

_________________
Painting with BIN


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:05 am 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:49 pm
Posts: 9939
Location: Oban
Has thanked: 337 times
Been thanked: 1761 times
No insulation and it'll be hot in summer, cold in winter. If you want a 'steady' temperature then slap a roll of insulation in. A single roll at around £15 would easily do it - cheap enough to not worry over, lots more complicated if you change your mind in the future - as everyone inevitably does!

and I 'second' DWD's recommendation for DPM.

_________________
sent from my laptop using my fingers - because we REALLY need to know where it's come from.....


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:15 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
dewaltdisney wrote:
May I suggest that, if you can lift it, to slide some damp course membrane under the floor supports to protect from moisture. See https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Damp-Pr ... m/p/133880

As for insulation I think it is only any use if you heat it and the insulation retains the heat. The ambient air will settle to the temperature and humidity it decides.

DWD


My mistake, I should've stated that a 1200 DPM will be used underneath the floating floor before affixing plywodd to the top.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:25 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
kellys_eye wrote:
No insulation and it'll be hot in summer, cold in winter. If you want a 'steady' temperature then slap a roll of insulation in. A single roll at around £15 would easily do it - cheap enough to not worry over, lots more complicated if you change your mind in the future - as everyone inevitably does!

and I 'second' DWD's recommendation for DPM.


The temperature isn't really an issue, one large or two smaller compressors a fuse board or junction box (a shed for storage only). What is a concern is humidty but I figure a de-humidifier would take of that. Insulation won't assist in reducing humidty in these circumstances?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:07 am 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:04 pm
Posts: 7896
Location: Fife
Has thanked: 992 times
Been thanked: 1856 times
If you aren’t going to introduce heat to the building then it’s a waste of time insulating the shed.
It’s worth sticking a small vent in tho to keep the place ventilated.

_________________
Carpentry,I can explain it to you but I cannot understand it for you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 12:36 pm 
Online
Senior Member

Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:35 pm
Posts: 3055
Has thanked: 43 times
Been thanked: 668 times
Insulation won't affect humidity at all and if you are not heating it then it will not have any effect either. How do you plan on sealing it up though? Dehumidifiers will be pointless if there is easy air infiltration, you need a sealed space really.

Also, why is humidity an issue, you mention compressors in there, what exactly are you using the shed for?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:19 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
steviejoiner74 wrote:
If you aren’t going to introduce heat to the building then it’s a waste of time insulating the shed.
It’s worth sticking a small vent in tho to keep the place ventilated.


Noted, thanks for the info :)

The Vent will be a bad idea, steel an iron tools will rust. I have two sheds already that are ventilated.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:25 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:04 pm
Posts: 7896
Location: Fife
Has thanked: 992 times
Been thanked: 1856 times
The Z'eer wrote:
dewaltdisney wrote:
May I suggest that, if you can lift it, to slide some damp course membrane under the floor supports to protect from moisture. See https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Damp-Pr ... m/p/133880

As for insulation I think it is only any use if you heat it and the insulation retains the heat. The ambient air will settle to the temperature and humidity it decides.

DWD


My mistake, I should've stated that a 1200 DPM will be used underneath the floating floor before affixing plywodd to the top.


Every timber you have down already should be sitting on a dpc. I’m assuming you aren’t planning on putting the 1200 Dpm on top of what’s already down?

_________________
Carpentry,I can explain it to you but I cannot understand it for you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:28 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
steviejoiner74 wrote:
The Z'eer wrote:
dewaltdisney wrote:
May I suggest that, if you can lift it, to slide some damp course membrane under the floor supports to protect from moisture. See https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Damp-Pr ... m/p/133880

As for insulation I think it is only any use if you heat it and the insulation retains the heat. The ambient air will settle to the temperature and humidity it decides.

DWD


My mistake, I should've stated that a 1200 DPM will be used underneath the floating floor before affixing plywodd to the top.


Every timber you have down already should be sitting on a dpc. I’m assuming you aren’t planning on putting the 1200 Dpm on top of what’s already down?


The framework sits on 20mm x 60mm nylon blocks spaced at various intervals, this keeps the timbers dry. The floating floor framework will rest on the 1200 gauge DPM


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:36 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
Rorschach wrote:
Insulation won't affect humidity at all and if you are not heating it then it will not have any effect either. How do you plan on sealing it up though? Dehumidifiers will be pointless if there is easy air infiltration, you need a sealed space really.

Also, why is humidity an issue, you mention compressors in there, what exactly are you using the shed for?


I'm think of entering the blow up dolly industry, hence the need for air compressors ;)

Planning on using Dow Corning 791 or some other frame sealer for sealing all the joins between the plywood. Predominantly automotive bodywork will be undertaken in a far larger shed adjacent to this little one


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:51 pm 
Online
Senior Member

Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:35 pm
Posts: 3055
Has thanked: 43 times
Been thanked: 668 times
Ah spraying. The dehumidifiers will be pointless then. You will need ventilation for the compressors and they will draw in moist air from outside much faster than the dehumidifers can dry it out. Better investing your money in a drier to use on the compressed air itself.

Run the air through a double moisture trap/filter and then either a desiccant or refrigerant drier, you will get much better results.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:57 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:37 pm
Posts: 86
Has thanked: 35 times
Been thanked: 1 times
Rorschach wrote:
Ah spraying. The dehumidifiers will be pointless then. You will need ventilation for the compressors and they will draw in moist air from outside much faster than the dehumidifers can dry it out. Better investing your money in a drier to use on the compressed air itself.

Run the air through a double moisture trap/filter and then either a desiccant or refrigerant drier, you will get much better results.


I'll just open the shed door when the compressors are in usage. When they're are not and which could be for long periods the de humidifier will keep the humidity low and the tools alongside the compressors rust free.

A drier is a good idea, but price wise is far more expensive than a small dessicant de humidifier. Also, and I've made one already, if only painting small quantities of body panels a simple dog leg copper pipe system works well enough as a moisture trap along with the filters I have.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 3:05 pm 
Online
Senior Member

Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:35 pm
Posts: 3055
Has thanked: 43 times
Been thanked: 668 times
Ok, the dehumidifier will help keep things rust free but will not do anything to help dry the air for spraying.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 


Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Solent plastics


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO