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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:31 pm 
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As part of the ongoing renovating of our flat (on a tight budget) I have now turned my attention to the doors. They are the last item really that dates the decor, everything else is fairly neutral and modern/timeless.

The doors are your classic sapele flat panel hollow core doors. Straight out of the late 70's and early 80's. They are in good condition, fit nicely and do the job perfectly well but they are ugly and old fashioned.
I would rather not replace them, so was thinking, is there a good way to bring them up to date a bit?

All ideas welcome.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 6:54 pm 
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Hello Rorschach
Its time consuming my flat had six I just sanded off the old finish and refinished them with oil and polished to bring out the grain and get a polished light reflecting finish and then upgraded hall lighting anything more than that and the cost/time goes up so that its cheaper to pay £15 for cheap new doors and slapping on a paint finish.

Yacht varnish or similar will give them to give high gloss perhaps applied with a roller and then lightly laid off with large brush

You could try bleaching and or shou sugi ban to get a different grain/colour effect but its hassle

If the door furniture is cheap/past its best /painted over, new door handles, hinges, magnetic door stops, bought on offer might lift. My local Homebase Discount centre has door furniture on 75% discount at the moment like for like obviously easiest

best of luck


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 6:27 am 
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Probably time wise it might just be better to replace, the cost soon adds up though, just a quick look at the cheapest doors at Wickes and it was £200 for doors alone, no hardware.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:25 am 
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I was thinking about this and trying to come up with cheaper solutions. One idea I had was using a router to cut a narrow channel and glue in some ebony stringing. See http://www.mcb-supplies.co.uk/BoxwoodEbonyLines.html Some horizontal lines at points on the door could give them a more modern look and the job is not too difficult with a bit of care and preparation. Just an idea.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:39 am 
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The idea that first came to mind was to use some moulding to create a faux panel door and then paint it all white like a modern doors seem to be. Looking at some pictures of that method online though, while some look amazing, an awful lot just look totally naff! :lol:
If it does look bad, it's a lot measuring, marking, mitres and work, especially since most of the doors will need it both sides and I have to sand and prep the door itself before I start.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:19 am 
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I was thinking something more like this ww.fine-doors.co.uk/internal-doors/oak-internal-doors/contemporary-oak-doors/corsica-oak-internal-fire-door-pre-finished/ You can make your own strings and pre-stain them. I cut some from the top veneer of a birch faced ply wood with a sharp craft knife and a steel ruler.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 7:58 am 
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dewaltdisney wrote:
I was thinking something more like this...


Attachment:
Corsica Oak Internal Fire Door 001_01.jpg
Corsica Oak Internal Fire Door 001_01.jpg [ 25.98 KiB | Viewed 575 times ]

Two issues that spring to mind are:

1. What (if any) is the core of the door. If these were solid-core 30 minute fire doors with no voids then it will be possible to inlay oak (or other strips) to create a (3-D) groove effect. As the doors do not have a completely solid core that will be out of the question

2. Whilst it may be possible to over veneer the doors it will require the door surfaces to be sanded clean of existing finish. In that case I'd recommend looking for an iron-on veneer sheet as opposed to traditional leaf veneer and hot glue which can be difficult for the novice (not saying it's beyond the OP's ability, though). One source of iron-on veneer is Veneers On-Line who I've used a couple of times, although even Amazon sells the stuff as do vendors on eBay. Because this material generally comes in rolls between 100 and 300mm wide it will be necessary to joint the pieces, making a design with similar grain patterns to the above feasible

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 8:38 am 
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I do not think R is keen on the idea anyway.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 10:45 am 
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I think ultimately trying to do anything other than simply paint the doors is going to be more expensive and more time consuming than simply replacing the doors.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 12:00 pm 
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Rorschach wrote:
I think ultimately trying to do anything other than simply paint the doors is going to be more expensive and more time consuming than simply replacing the doors.


It was similar here. Soon after moving in (25+ years ago) I made a single faux panel on the doors like the photo (top part of the door). I used pins and glue and weights on the doors being flat on the floor to stick the beading. Sides and top are all the same distance from the edges the bottom of the panel higher up (I can give you dimensions if you are interested). Painted them white back then (Crown probably eggshell ... thinnest solvent paint I had ever used and I was clueless about bridging coats to grip on varnish).

In full honesty I prefer my doors to the faux plastic wood grain doors you can get now.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 12:45 pm 
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I've seen doors with painted on faux panels online.
No beading or anything. Just paint.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:04 am 
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I did this years ago in my old house.
I made square frames from some thin moulding, glued and pinned on.
I went for 3 squares down the center of the door.
I then painted the doors white and painted within the frame a colour to match the walls of the room.
Looked very smart, but was a bit of a PITA with all those mitres and trying to get them centered on the door and evenly spaced.
When I did upstairs doors, I switched to a slightly chunkier moulding, and just a single "panel" rectangle frame. Much easier.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 8:43 am 
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When we moved into our house Somme 15 odd years ago there was a very useful , functional but a tad unattractive built in wardrobe with 4 six foot doors and another 4 smaller doors above those all painted that reddish mahogany colour. What I did was to face them in hardboard. I set this in an inch from the face and cut a square out of two diagonally opposite corners. I then cut another piece set in a further inch so creating a stepped double rebate affair , very Art Deco , before reprinting in a magnolia eggshell.


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