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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:18 pm 
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A few months back I made some fox wedges from some old fork lift truck forks fox-wedges-made-from-old-forklift-truck-forks-t87632.html

I saved the remainder of the forks to make other items in future. One of the jobs I do at work requires an open ended 19mm spanner and the nut needs to be really tight but finding a 19mm open ended flogging/slogging spanner proved impossible and so I made one last week from the old fork lift truck fork.

Attachment:
slog-1 (Medium).JPG
slog-1 (Medium).JPG [ 68.74 KiB | Viewed 1088 times ]


It was pretty easy to make and just required a hole drilling for the open end of the spanner, then about 90 minutes of cutting, grinding and polishing with the 4.5 inch angle grinder.

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slog2 (Medium).JPG
slog2 (Medium).JPG [ 69.96 KiB | Viewed 1088 times ]


This shows the slogging spanner on top of one of the forks which it was made from-

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slog3 (Medium).JPG
slog3 (Medium).JPG [ 95.23 KiB | Viewed 1088 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:31 pm 
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Nice job! :thumbleft:
Great to make your own tools where needed.
One of the first jobs we did as apprentices in the training school was making a small spanner by hacksawing and filing.
The biggest slogging spanner I ever saw was the one used for tightening the roll bearing housing into a three stand four high cold reduction mill.
I can't remember the actual size, but the nuts were massive, must have been well over 18" AF (although they were a Whitworth size stamped on the spanner IIRC ) The"King d*ck spanner was lifted into place with the crane before being sledge hammered tight.



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:42 pm 
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Thats a posh one Chez! I must admit, i prefer ring types for slogging spanners, you can get your hand out of the way and give it a good smack...perhaps a bit excessive for M12s though i suppose.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:29 pm 
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Hitch wrote:
Thats a posh one Chez! I must admit, i prefer ring types for slogging spanners, you can get your hand out of the way and give it a good smack...perhaps a bit excessive for M12s though i suppose.


We have been replacing a lot of track in the ovens at work, which are basically steel channel with a piece of 10mm thick case hardened steel on top. The case hardened steel is drilled and countersunk before it is case hardened, it is fixed to the channel using M16 countersunk bolts down one side- these need flogging up really tight as heavy bogies with steel wheels travel over them weighing several tonnes each.

On the other side of the track it is a I beam with 10mm case hardened steel on top again, the wear plates need bolting down with M12 countersunk bolts but it's really difficult getting them tight as you can't get a ring spanner on as the nuts are so close to the web of the beam, which is why I made the 19mm open ender.

I just bought a M24 safewrench, but have not used it yet- it looks really good though and will be much safer than a traditional flogger. I think it was about £36


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 7:38 pm 
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Sounds a bit of a job Chez. Got the tool for doing it now though :thumbright:

I like the idea of that safewrench, be interesting to see how the springs hold out after being beat about a bit. Doesn't seem overly expensive either.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:22 am 
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Good job bro, should be heavy right?!


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