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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 2:51 pm 
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A few weeks ago I was cutting some small pieces on my saw. The saw kicked back for want of a better term, snitching the workpiece and ejecting it. No harm to myself however it bent one of the saw teeth and the angle guide at the back. I replaced both items.

Today when I was again cutting some small trim it did same, the ejected piece struck my finger the impact was like a hammer strike removing skin by impact rather than abrasion. There is some swelling and bruising however movement is good and I should imagine it will bruise fairly heavily. I don't think it was far away from a break and had it hit me in the face i could have lost teeth. I had safety glasses on. I was quite shaken up to be honest, at least after the expletives.

I do not want any repeats and would appreciate any pointers.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:07 pm 
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do you mean a mitre saw or a table saw ??
does the blade spin true??
is it the correct blade ??
is the riving knife set in line with the blade??
is the fence parallel to the blade ??

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:18 pm 
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if it is a sliding mitre are you pulling clear off the work
dropping down starting then pushing forward holding the workpeice firmly in place :dunno:

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:20 pm 
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Is the blade teeth pitch fine enough for this small work and have you allowed it to reach speed before inserting the wood!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:22 pm 
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aeromech3 wrote:
Is the blade teeth pitch fine enough for this small work and have you allowed it to reach speed before inserting the wood!

i may have confused the issue :dunno:
just checking if its a slider or table saw :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:30 pm 
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It is a sliding mitre saw. Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:34 pm 
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never ever had anything remotely as vicious as you describe :scratch:
blade on the correct way round??
what saw is it what blade and what timber type are you cutting??

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 4:01 pm 
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Assuming everything else is OK as already said.
Then:
Use a false fence if possible to support the work and the offcut.
Make sure the offcut isn't trapped between a stop or anything else and the blade.
Don't work with pieces that are too small to hold properly. I remember reading somewhere that a large percentage of woodworking machinery accidents are down to that. Either make the cuts off a larger piece, or make a jig or holder to allow smaller pieces to be cut.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:53 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
Assuming everything else is OK as already said.
Then:
Use a false fence if possible to support the work and the offcut.
Make sure the offcut isn't trapped between a stop or anything else and the blade.
Don't work with pieces that are too small to hold properly. I remember reading somewhere that a large percentage of woodworking machinery accidents are down to that. Either make the cuts off a larger piece, or make a jig or holder to allow smaller pieces to be cut.



Make sure the offcut isn't trapped between a stop or anything else and the blade....... With small offcuts how can I be sure
Don't work with pieces that are too small to hold properly. I remember reading somewhere that a large percentage of woodworking....... This may be part of the problem, both occasions were small items/.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:19 pm 
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do you have a link to the saw please
just to check we understand that what we call a sliding mitre saw is the same as your sliding mitre saw
and not perhaps something like this ??
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=mini+sliding+ ... -Track.jpg

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:20 pm 
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Jonno34 wrote:

Make sure the offcut isn't trapped between a stop or anything else and the blade....... With small offcuts how can I be sure


You must know if you're using a stop to cut multiple pieces of the exact same size.

If I need to do that, I'll usually wait for the blade to stop spinning before lifting it away from the bed - it's a whole lot slower but you get to keep all your soft bits.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:47 pm 
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ayjay wrote:
Jonno34 wrote:

Make sure the offcut isn't trapped between a stop or anything else and the blade....... With small offcuts how can I be sure


You must know if you're using a stop to cut multiple pieces of the exact same size.

If I need to do that, I'll usually wait for the blade to stop spinning before lifting it away from the bed - it's a whole lot slower but you get to keep all your soft bits.


On 2nd fix work I do the same ayjay,I let the blade stop. Had a few close shaves myself so I wait an extra 5-6 seconds now.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:52 pm 
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:ttiuwop:

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:56 pm 
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someone-else wrote:
:ttiuwop:


OK. here's a picture of a sliding mitre saw.


Attachments:
sliding mitre.jpg
sliding mitre.jpg [ 72.51 KiB | Viewed 869 times ]

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:43 pm 
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someone-else wrote:
:ttiuwop:

OK, bright spark, explain to me how on earth I (or anyone other than an intelligent octopus - and I've yet to meet one of those with a CSCS card) can hold the workpiece with the left hand, while operating the mitre saw with their right - whilst simultaneously taking a photo.......... :shock: ::b :roll: And yes, I know I can be a sarky begger - it's been a long, hard week........

OK, I'm with the other chippies on this - if you need to cut a very short piece as opposed to doing a "sliver" or "dust cut" you need to ensure that you support the workpiece on a false bed (or bed and fence if the swaw's fence has a big gap) to ensure that after the small piece has been severed it cannot drop into any gap in the bed and secondly when making such cuts you need to make the cut but hold the blade in the down position, switch off and let the blade spin down before allowing the saw to retract from the cut under spring pressure. When using false fences/beds they are normally screwed to the tool's back fence, but again a spot of hot melt or blob or two of silicone (allowed to set) can do just as well - I prefer the former, but on site I will sometimes do the latter

Another little tip for dealing with cutting and trimming very small lengths of stuff like beadings, and beadings of very small section (which can be very fragile), on the chop saw (which can be very hazardous for the ole' pinkies) is to "weld" the short/small piece onto a larger MDF or plywood offcut backer using a hot melt glue, make the cut and then part the two by using a sharp chisel give a sharp tap with a mallet (or hammer, assuming that the handle is designed for use with hammers). Much, much safer

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For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : Dave54
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