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 Post subject: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 10:01 pm 
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MDF skirtings, fixings into thermalites...

Got a fair whack of skirting to do soon, as above.

I'm not interested in grab adhesives etc, I want a decent fix that is reliable and reasonably fast...and will pull up little undulations...holes can be filled and painted.

What do the pros amongst you use?

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 4:49 am 
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Clear silicone and a paslode finish nailer in this instance is what I’d personally use.

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:00 am 
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Grab adhesive and second fix nailer, similar to Stevie. For more porous walls EvoStik Stick Like... is pretty hard to beat

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:48 am 
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Hitch wrote:
MDF skirtings, fixings into thermalites...

Got a fair whack of skirting to do soon, as above.

I'm not interested in grab adhesives etc, I want a decent fix that is reliable and reasonably fast...and will pull up little undulations...holes can be filled and painted.

What do the pros amongst you use?


For myself, I use some sticky and a second fix nailer, as already suggested, and ignore the little undulations, that's what decorators caulk is for, but with all of your criteria in mind I would choose cut nails, (or screws and plugs, slower).

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 11:47 am 
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I never did get into the habit of 'sticking' skirt's or arch's. My age bracket also puts me into a group which confesses to never have used a 2nd Fix Nailer!
Only last year I did a job which entailed fixing approx 30m of 100mm English Oak Skirt in a bespoke profile. Also, the fix was into Thermalite!
I used screw & plugs combined with a counter-bore & Peleted finish. The pelets made on a drill press from off-cuts. The fix was comparatively easy and I have not had any call backs.
Even if it was softwood, I would probably have used the same method.
Although I do appreciate that I'm not on ridgid pricwork like a lot of you lads.

Davyp1


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 12:46 pm 
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davyp1 wrote:
Although I do appreciate that I'm not on rigid pricework like a lot of you lads.


It's one of the problems with pricework.

Once a new method is established to speed things up, it's only a matter of time before the prices drop accordingly and everyone needs a second fix nailer and a mastic gun (or whatever) to keep up.

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 2:05 pm 
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Why a second fix nailer over a first fix ?
I would assume that the thicker gauge nail used in a first fix would be stronger so help pull the skirting in tighter..


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 2:52 pm 
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stevewestern wrote:
Why a second fix nailer over a first fix ?
I would assume that the thicker gauge nail used in a first fix would be stronger so help pull the skirting in tighter..

Because you are left with a large hole like the back of jfk’s head on the skirting if you use a first fix nailer on skirting instead of a nice neat pinhole using a finish nailer.

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 3:03 pm 
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steviejoiner74 wrote:
stevewestern wrote:
Why a second fix nailer over a first fix ?
I would assume that the thicker gauge nail used in a first fix would be stronger so help pull the skirting in tighter..

Because you are left with a large hole like the back of jfk’s head on the skirting if you use a first fix nailer on skirting instead of a nice neat pinhole using a finish nailer.


OK, Thanks.
I had guessed in might be in part down to the hole left, but thought there might be another reason as well.

Something learned every day..!

Could be down to some of the plasterers I have worked with that my skirtings need every little bit of help to pull them in...


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:39 pm 
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I dont have a 2nd fix nail gun, but was considering buying a 16g gun (pneumatic)
Would that do the job? Plaster etc doesnt cause it an issue?

I suppose the pins hold it enough to allow the adhesive to dry...?
I'm not adverse to using a bit of adhesive in conjunction with a mechanical fixing if thats a tried and tested method by the pros.

The old stuff was on with 4" cut nails, a pair about every 12"... mullered the skirtings removing it.

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:43 pm 
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Is there not an option of using plug and screws and sticking the white round caps on top to hide the screw? The chap who fitted my shutters used this method and I have to say that it does not look bad at all. Decorators caulk sorts out any undulations.


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 11:57 pm 
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stevewestern wrote:
Could be down to some of the plasterers I have worked with that my skirtings need every little bit of help to pull them in...

Because plasterers are imperfect human beings (they tend to argue differently, however ....) I reckon they have a tendency to lift the pressure off a bit at either end of their stroke - so the bottoms of almost any wall you come across these days will be the same. The simple solution is to chips back any "snots" at the bottom of the wall to flatten it a bit - a task for which I personally find a brick bolster and club hammer very, uh..... satisfying (yes, really!). Don't forget that hand brush and dustpan - you'll need them (even if you don't beat the bottom of the plastering into submission)

Hitch wrote:
I dont have a 2nd fix nail gun, but was considering buying a 16g gun (pneumatic)
Would that do the job? Plaster etc doesnt cause it an issue?

For softwood and MDF a 2nd fix (16ga) gun is the norm - so no, plaster doesn't cause any issues

Hitch wrote:
I suppose the pins hold it enough to allow the adhesive to dry...?

That's exactly how it's meant to work. The reason is pretty simple - the adhesive is more than sufficient on decent quality masonry or drywall to do the job whilst a 16ga pinhole requires a lot less filling and sanding before painting than even oval nails do. So it saves time and gives a better finish - there really isn't any need to use girt great fixings any more on more modern structures

mahoak wrote:
Is there not an option of using plug and screws and sticking the white round caps on top to hide the screw? The chap who fitted my shutters used this method and I have to say that it does not look bad at all. Decorators caulk sorts out any undulations.

Hardly going to give you the smooth look that we are normally required to produce in skirting, though, not to mention that I reckon the caps would last a few weeks before someone slid a chair or chest of drawers past a few of them and knocked the caps off. (And BTW did I mention that skirtings were originally introduced as a means of protecting the plasterwork at the bottom of the wall?). I've worked on jobs where the skirting was non-existent in places - the bottoms of those walls didn't last that long and on one of them we went back 6 months later to install "flush skirtings" with a shadow groove above them

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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 2:05 am 
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Get thermal block fixings such as these from screwfix.
https://www.screwfix.com/p/plasplugs-thermal-block-fixings-nylon-33mm-40-pack/7264K?tc=DA5&ds_rl=1249481&ds_rl=1245250&gclid=Cj0KCQiAp8fSBRCUARIsABPL6JbleoB9rQ9x5wbdFayCncMgLPr2HnNxM-Evn80NUZyxyw_1OPrOA-MaAjoeEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CJ2-oo6jx9gCFa0i0wodeKYFpQ


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 5:34 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
(And BTW did I mention that skirtings were originally introduced as a means of protecting the plasterwork at the bottom of the wall?


A few years ago I worked at a bullion bank near me fitting 6x2 as skirtings specifically because the original 4" bullnose was being trashed by the forklifts bashing the bins into them . By bins I mean those metre square steel things often loaded full of bags of coins or notes.
Anyway as it wasn't mine I still had to work and in my time I've fitted skirting with plugs and screws with either filler or pellets depending on the timber , I've used nailing into timber plugs or grounds and I've used the glue and pin method . I don't have a 2nd fix nailer , or any nailer for that matter , probably because I don't do enough to warrant one or maybe I'm just the same age as davyp. Thus when I'm gluing and pinning I just use inch and a half panel pins and a nail punch without any problem.


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 Post subject: Re: Skirting fittings
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:44 am 
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When I started we were still chopping wedges, chopping out the mortar with a pointing chisel and banging the wedges into the walls (oddly enough a technique I had to resort to last year on one job to hold the replacement window linings in place). Skirtings were then fixed using either small oval nails or panel pins, as you say well punched under using a hammer and a nail set then filled with blob of putty. There often wasn't that much time difference between wedging and using an electric drill and the original fibre Rawlplugs with screws (which were pretty much always used with hardwood) - always assuming that you had electricity available, which was maybe 50% of the time. There were no grip adhesives then. Grip adhesives have made to job far easier and faster, the only two issues I find are that there is a limit to how thick you can lay the stuff in and they don't work well on damp walls. But then you shouldn't be fixing to damp walls.......

To anyone reading this who thinks I'm talking ancient history - I'm not yet at retirement age and the firm I worked for wasn't that old-fashioned

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