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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:40 pm 
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Hi folks,

I've taken out an old window board in my daughters bedroom (I've done similar in rooms downstairs). The old board wasn't in a good state and the previous occupants had glued a PVC sheet/cover over the top which (if you try) rips off the wood underneath. The new board is cut and ready to go in (in fact it's temporarily back in at the moment). It's a messy job as the old board is propeller wedged in - once this is manoeuvred out it pretty much takes out the top two layers of brickwork underneath. In this case, however, the top layer is a mix of half bricks (split down the length) and lumps of cement.
Just a quick question on the best option for relaying this top layer? I'll relay the loose row below, but would it be possible to just add mortar to those loose bits of half bricks/quarter bricks and old lumps of cement? Obviously I'll make it level and eventually the wall below will be re plastered.
Probably glue the new board (once I've primed it) into place - there's a ridge at the back (the outer skin of bricks) under the window, then the air gap then this row of 'muddled' bricks.

Many thanks.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 5:54 pm 
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I think I'd feel inclined to put the split course in first (could be anything clay/cement based, like old roof tiles if the bricks are shot) and then a row of whole bricks on the top, this gives the option of a good fix if you want to screw it down.

My preferred option for fixing is with angle brackets screwed to the underside of the w/b and then to the brickwork below, the brackets are then buried in the new plaster.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:14 pm 
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Thanks Ayjay - I think you may have mentioned that angle bracket technique a couple of years ago on here (which I then did for a downstairs hall window board and also a bay window - a trio of boards!).
For an upstairs hall board I think I had a massive rush as the plasterer was turning up so I think I used gripfill to secure! The original boards (and indeed the new ones) were/are fitted underneath bricks on either side (so the board kind of slots in and is pretty stable before being secured).
Wasn't entirely sure whether chucking anything into some mortar is ok...but sounds like it probably is (as long as straight). I've just realised (when thinking if I had any wall tiles etc) that I have a load of old bricks in the back from part of an internal wall - is it tricky to split these in half (lengthways rather than horizontally in the middle)? I've split bricks in half (the usual 'half brick') before but not the other way.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:16 pm 
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somapop wrote:
is it tricky to split these in half (lengthways rather than horizontally in the middle)? I've split bricks in half (the usual 'half brick') before but not the other way.



It's easy enough if you don't rush it, use a 4" bolster and a club hammer and aim to hit it all the way round on the same line, keep going and you'll soon have a small groove all around the brick, then you can increase the force of the blows and the brick will eventually split - you won't win a prize every time but most of them will be usable, (or just buy an angle grinder).

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:18 am 
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Cheers Ayjay - I'll do that. I think I have a 4" bolster knocking around, although I'm increasingly considering an angle grinder as my next tool (a few things coming up that will absolutely require one). Actually, I have small grinder - won't go all the way through the brick but perhaps enough to create a deep enough groove for me to then knock out with the bolster.

God I love this forum...I haven't been on here for a while but I have a few projects coming up :)

Many thanks again.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:40 am 
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I have found that just scoring a shallow line with an angle grinder is enough to give a clean break through the brick with a bolster :thumbright: My angle grinder is a cheapy, about £18, and it has done all I want. Aldi or Lidl were doing them recently. Make sure you get both discs, steel and stone while you are at it.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:36 am 
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All the way around the perimeter or just one (the long) side?
I do have a cheap angle grinder...it was either an Aldi one or Titan brand - I'll dig it out later!
Cheers.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:54 am 
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Just the face I would say, the sides may help I guess. I cut some bricks this way and it went very well. On clearing out once you get one brick out they will pop out with a thump. Make sure you use the right disc as that is important.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:08 am 
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The bricks all became lose the moment I fought with the old board - there's something to be said about that propeller wedge method of fixing (had the same struggles with removing old skirting). What I'll probably do (if I can get a reasonably clean break on the bricks) is relay the second layer (the full bricks as per my picture above) and then lay the half bricks on top placing the cut/bolstered edge down (on a bed of mortar) so there's a clean, straight run above.
As the boards are slotted in under the frame bricks (you can just about see that to the right of my second picture - I'll point in some mortar when the old fell out), there isn't a great deal of fixing to worry about: the boards downstairs are absolutely solid a couple of years since I did them.

Cheers!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:26 am 
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I stuck my window boards down with silicone, that worked fine. There is no movement in general use likely to dislodge them so I would not over fix.

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