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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:46 pm 
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Hello everyone,

I've been living at the current property for approx 6 months now. We never had any condensation issues, but over the last few weeks as the temperature dropped, the condensation has got so bad, that it's dripping on the double-glazed window glass and upvc frames. Every morning I have to get a squeegee & several towels to wipe it. What's strange though is that the condensation is only in the living room and our bedrooms, but not in the hallway, kitchen or lounge.

FYI, I have already eliminated drying wet clothes, ironing as the clothes are now dried at the local dryers and when the ironing is done, the windows are left constantly open. We have no leaking central heating pipes and gas fires are not used...only central heating.

Any advise or ideas would be much appreciated as I'm tearing my hair out figuring the problem.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:17 pm 
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How big is the property, how many people, extractor for showers etc. Have you got a humidity monitor? Bedroom window condensation is common as you produce a lot of moisture just by sweating/breathing while you sleep.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:31 pm 
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I believe its a modern day problem because you are "sealing your self in a box" so any moisture (even from your breath) can not get out
If you have double glazing could you not leave one window a tiny bit open and locked? (Not sure what its called but most windows you can do this with) but for it to work you need to have another window like this at the other end of the house to allow air to flow.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:02 pm 
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Thank you for your replies.

Rorschach - It's a 1930's semi-detached, with 4 bedrooms, large extended kitchen, 1 bathroom, 2 living rooms & a basement. We haven't got a shower extractor as yet, but we are looking into this. For the moment, as soon as we've had a shower, we wipe down the shower cubile with a squeegee and then leave the bathroom windows open for a couple of hours to allow the moisture to escape. We don't have a special humidity monitor, but our radio-clock shows that the humidity in our living room is 70%

someone-else - We don't mind leaving windows slightly open, however any heat escapes too and as you can imagine, this makes the rooms very cold.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:59 am 
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UPDATE:-
I left the window slightly open in lock-mode as suggested, but this unfortunately hasn't made any difference and we still have condensation. :wtf:

Now I'm confused because if ventilation is not clearing it then I don't know what will....

Any more suggestions?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:29 am 
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This is an odd one, in our house (large 50's semi, extended) there are only problems with condensation in the bedrooms which is a natural and pretty much unavoidable problem no matter what the ventilation.
The fact you are having problems in the living room is odd and I would be looking for possible damp areas, we did have damp in our living room once, turned out it was a tiny leak from the radiator pipe that was soaking an area of carpet that isn't walked on, that caused a few problems for a while.

I would suggest the first thing to do would be ignore the bedrooms for now and look around the downstairs living area, feel all floors, pipes, walls inside and outside of cupboards and check for damp/cold spots, just so we can rule out that cause.

Oh and a quick tip for the bedrooms, window condensation is a big problem in the bedroom and kitchen at our flat (1 bedroom 80's build, fairly well sealed up though we have window vents). It's simply caused by natural moisture from people living there. Each morning we use a window vacuum (vax version of the karcher), they are inexpensive, quick and easy to use and capture a lot of moisture that you can then pour right down the drain, makes a massive difference and takes just a minute or two each morning while the kettle boils for a cuppa.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:32 am 
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How old is the double glazing ? does it ever mist up internally ?

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:49 am 
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Thanks for your quick replies.

Rorschach - Thanks for the tip. Any recommendations on a cheap vacuum? One of the first things I did when I noticed condensation downstairs is to check for damp problems. We have no leaking radiator pipes and the carpet is bone dry. I will check this again though just in case I've missed anything.

wine~o - I don't know the exact age of the double-glazing, but it does look fairly new & modern. When you say mist internally, are you saying like a leak between the double-glazed glass itself? If so, then no it doesn't. The windows are in excellent condition.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:49 am 
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70% is jolly high - it's likely to be causing mould and suchlike behind places that don't have airflow if it's like that a lot.

Might be worth getting a dehumidifier - it's AMAZING the difference it can make. We got one for the other place that had issues (until they were sorted) and the difference it made was unreal. About a quid or so a day to run over winter, it was a total no brainer.

Plus, it had a laundry mode. If you can put it central the affected rooms, it'll make a huge difference. Keep doors open mind.

Where in the UK are you?

Also, when the humidty is reduced, heating feels a lot nicer too....it's less "wet" if that makes sense? Rooms heat up much quicker.

(we got this, for reference, a while ago: meaco-dd8l-junior-review-dehumidifier-warning-long-post-t62005.html?hilit=meaco)

BG

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:53 am 
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BillyGoat wrote:
70% is jolly high - it's likely to be causing mould and suchlike behind places that don't have airflow if it's like that a lot.

Might be worth getting a dehumidifier - it's AMAZING the difference it can make. We got one for the other place that had issues (until they were sorted) and the difference it made was unreal. About a quid or so a day to run over winter, it was a total no brainer.

Plus, it had a laundry mode. If you can put it central the affected rooms, it'll make a huge difference. Keep doors open mind.

Where in the UK are you?

Also, when the humidty is reduced, heating feels a lot nicer too....it's less "wet" if that makes sense? Rooms heat up much quicker.

(we got this, for reference, a while ago: meaco-dd8l-junior-review-dehumidifier-warning-long-post-t62005.html?hilit=meaco)

BG


Thanks for the suggestion BillyGoat. A quid a day seems quite expensive to me...how many watts is it?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 9:17 am 
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I wouldn't say 70% is high for humidity, pretty average in fact.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:24 pm 
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doit wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion BillyGoat. A quid a day seems quite expensive to me...how many watts is it?


That was finger in the (dry) air, rough guestimate. It's on a card meter as it's not my house so may be more expensive and there is a boiler running all the time too, with some other stuff - may be less. It's the model mentioned above, so you'll be able to find usage.

Dessicant heaters tend to use more power, but the offshoot is that the heat is churned right back into the home.

BG

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:38 pm 
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BillyGoat wrote:
doit wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion BillyGoat. A quid a day seems quite expensive to me...how many watts is it?


That was finger in the (dry) air, rough guestimate. It's on a card meter as it's not my house so may be more expensive and there is a boiler running all the time too, with some other stuff - may be less. It's the model mentioned above, so you'll be able to find usage.

Dessicant heaters tend to use more power, but the offshoot is that the heat is churned right back into the home.

BG


Thanks billy. I still am curious about what make/model dehumidifier your using and how many watts this is as it would help me to decide.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 5:14 pm 
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It's this one: http://www.appliancesdirect.co.uk/meaco ... AgMx8P8HAQ

Quote:
All Meaco dehumidifiers come with a two year warranty as standard.

Best on test Award Winner 2013, can dry a 1-5 bedroom house
Combats mould, condensation and damp
Popular with flat owners because it dries laundry and is quiet
Perfect for use in conservatories
Strong durable design
Proprietary Meaco control power saving logic
Extraction rate not affected by low temperature
Features

For homes from flats up to 5 bed rooms
Simple Meaco style control panel with preset humidistat and stopping timer
Humidity permanently monitored by unique economy programme
Suitable for all domestic and unmanned applications
Covered tank
Anti-spill tank
Auto restart after powercut
Continuous drainage
Meaco Control Logic - helps reduce energy consumption by 80%
Dehumidifying capacity 8 litres / day
Water tank: 2 litres with permanent drainage facility supplied as standard
Air flow 80/100/115m3/h
Operating range 1 - 37 degrees
Dimensions (w x d x h) 351 x 188 x 500mm
Net weight 6.4Kgs
Gross weight 7.4Kgs
Sound pressure level 39/43/48dB
Power consumption 30/330/650 watts
Power supply 220-240V / 50Hz


Edit, just to add to this, when it reaches the desired humidity, it switches off - it's not a 24/7 thing (unless you have real issues). Also, we found that the first time you fire it up, it will fill in a short space of time (same for all models, regardless of tank size). If you can put it somewhere and put the pipe into a drain, it'll save you emptying it every so often.

BG

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:06 pm 
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Thanks very much BillyGoat. I will certainly look into this. Does your humidifier cover the whole house or just one room? Because I'd need a humidifier to cover 3 bedrooms & a living room.

Now don't shoot me, but mentioning living room, I may have possibly found the issue. The living room bay-window has a large wooden/plastic sill running along the bottom. This sill base is sitting on top of the external cavity-wall (Similar to image below)

This I've noticed is much colder than the hallway window sill and you can also feel a very mild draft of cold air coming from it. Correct me if I'm wrong, but could this be the issue?

Image


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