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 Post subject: Saw horse v work bench?
PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:48 am 
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So I have been looking into buying a circular saw and a saw horse or work bench to use in order to saw pieces/sheets of wood. Having never done this before I am not sure what would be best as the sawhorses that you see don't seem to have any way of securing the wood onto them from what I can see. Would I be better getting a small work bench? Thanks for any advice


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 12:20 pm 
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cutting-mdf-with-circular-saw-t83460.html
workbench-sawbench-project-t89129.html

Here are a couple of threads that have been discussed and may help you

Mike

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 12:51 pm 
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If I have 8X4 sheets to cut up I use a pair of Zag saw-horses, on top of those goes two 4X2s just shy of 8'0", on top of those another three 4 X 2s just shy of 4'0" and perpendicular to the first two.

If there's a lot of sheets (and therefore much handling and potential for the 4X2s to be dislodged) I'll screw down the long 4X2s, (I have piece of 2x1 batten screwed to the top of my Zags), and then all the sheets go on the first two 4X2s and the shorter 4 X 2s go under the top sheet, this is ideal for long cuts. If you're cutting across the 4'0" way you need to arrange the 4X2s accordingly.

I use an 8'0" aluminium straightedge (and a 4'0" for shorter cuts) and a pair of clamps - that why the 4X2s are a little under 4" & 8", it always leaves room for the clamps.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:35 pm 
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Thanks folks


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:51 pm 
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A lot of people these that are using track saws work on top of a sheet of rigid insulation -it saves the risk of cutting through a saw horse but provides full support. It needs some timber as per ayjay suggests or work off the floor


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:56 am 
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if your buyin sheets of ply, go to a proper wood supplies an they will rip your sheets to your sizes.
you can lay 2by4's on the deck an cut an rip the sheets on them


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:49 am 
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I use what I term a saw horse ,6x2 top , 4x2 legs and a sacrificial piece of ply on top useful to work on and use as a hopup . Fits nicely in the van. A workbench in my eyes is a larger less easily moveable piece of kit more suitable to a workshop. Perhaps a clarification of what Scottish Jimmy has in mind might help.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:38 am 
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I like a pair of basic workmate style benches instead of sawhorses, much more versatile.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:56 am 
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i have in my van a black an decker work mate. the decent type with the extra legs on the bottom. its handy for some jobs.

i also have a long aluminium hop up which is again useful.

i also have a sheet of mdf with some 3x1 biscuited to it around the edges that i put ontop of some folding trestles i have. the mdf is cut to whatever the size of the trestles is plus a little bit and its cut to about 6 ft long. its handy for some jobs also.

the draw back with that one i guess is i sometimes have to raise stuff up on offcuts of timber. and if im say cutting out a worktop for a sink hole or a hob or whatever it means having it overhanging and ive gotta move it about a canny bit like. in that case i might in future adopt ayjay's plan with the 4x2


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:26 pm 
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I've got a few of the workmates too but don't really bother with them. They can be very useful but I just find them a bit "rattley " and clanky if that makes sense..


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 1:39 pm 
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Grendel wrote:
I've got a few of the workmates too but don't really bother with them. They can be very useful but I just find them a bit "rattley " and clanky if that makes sense..


On their own yes they are but if you put two up and then put a surface on top that has a batten fixed to each end then use the "vice" to clamp onto this you get a very sturdy workbench.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:20 pm 
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Yes I've done that myself , I've also screwed the 4x2 to the sawhorses too and just plonked it on the floor , I've even just used my trailer without the sides as a work bench. I suppose it's being adaptable more than finding one method better or worse than any other .
That said I do find the vice useful on workmates especially when working on anything small and fiddly.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 7:51 pm 
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Yes it is very useful. I have several tools in my workshop mounted on a board with a 4x2 batten underneath. I can clamp them in my bench vice to use or take them outside and clamp in the workmate. Very useful, especially for tools like a chop saw as it makes a sturdy little stand.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:31 pm 
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Stopped using Workmates because they cause me (and a lot of other tallish folk) lower back pain because they are too low. Been through a multitude of trestles, etc and finally ended up with a couple of those DW folding steel jobbies with the ally legs about 2 years ago. Screwed a 4 x 2 CLS atop them both. Heavy duty and seemingly unbreakable, they do service with a lattice-work tanble for sheet breaking-down. The downsides are that they are bulky, heavy and very expensive - but nothing I've used to date comes even close. If I didn't have those I'd build myself a couple of traditional sawing stools (taller than normal ones which are designed for hand sawing with the knee holding the materials in place) and make-up a latticework table around 7 x 3ft

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