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 Post subject: salt from new brick work
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:01 pm 
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Has any one any suggestions how to remove salt marks from new brick work please.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:28 pm 
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Try here,

http://www.harrison.inuk.com/building.htm

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 11:30 am 
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Hi Ragdalian,

This is usually a sign that the bricks have been stored incorrectly before being laid ie allowed to become excessively wet or not stored off ground although saying this i have found that some bricks are prone to this.
The best way to remove this is wait until the wall is fully dry then brush with either a hard churn brush or soft wire brush (depending on how hard the bricks are) unfortunately this may have to be done over a period of months as you will find that the sulphates may come back, do not use water or acid as this dilutes the salt/sulphate making it soak back into the brick.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 7:02 pm 
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This is called efflorescence. Have a read of this http://www.azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=1398

Not an awful lot you can do without making it worse in my opinion.

DWD


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:53 pm 
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[quote="leebwk"]Hi Ragdalian,

This is usually a sign that the bricks have been stored incorrectly before being laid ie allowed to become excessively wet or not stored off ground although saying this i have found that some bricks are prone to this.
The best way to remove this is wait until the wall is fully dry then brush with either a hard churn brush or soft wire brush (depending on how hard the bricks are) unfortunately this may have to be done over a period of months as you will find that the sulphates may come back, do not use water or acid as this dilutes the salt/sulphate making it soak back into the brick.

Thanks for info you are correct in your thinking as the bricks although new have been stored for over a year and are slightly damp. Should I remove the plastic covering from the packs of bricks to let some air to them to help dry them out. Cheers


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 4:22 pm 
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If the bricks are already covered in plastic then thats fine, it's probably the fact that they have been lying around for about a year in different climate changes that may be a factor, i wouldn't remove the plastic until use, in fact i would cover over with an additional tarp and make sure they are off the ground, you will only be able to minimise the efflorescance rather than eradicate it.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2008 10:06 pm 
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it may help if you use a sulphate resisting cement and don't let the previously laid top course of bricks get wet (even after the mortar has set) and especially if they are wet don't bed the next course.

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