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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:39 pm 
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Hi
I have a wooden garage door frame and it's rotted where the hinge sits. The frame is 4 inch X 3 inch. Only about 1 inch deep is rotted so I thinks its not too bad. What filler shall I use for this purpose? or what other solutions are there?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 8:32 am 
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You really need to be looking at splicing rather than filling.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:41 am 
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Grendel wrote:
You really need to be looking at splicing rather than filling.

I know but it's a bigger job and thinking a wood hardener/filler would suffice? Plus add a third hinge to lessen the load on that one.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:49 am 
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yartin wrote:
Grendel wrote:
You really need to be looking at splicing rather than filling.

I know but it's a bigger job and thinking a wood hardener/filler would suffice? Plus add a third hinge to lessen the load on that one.


It depends on how long you want the bodge to last, at best it will only last a year or eighteen months but sooner or later you will have to bite the bullet and replace all or part of the frame .

Mike

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 4:18 pm 
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Filler will never hold well for something like that. Better to just get on and splice in a new piece of wood using a good waterproof PVA glue.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 5:35 pm 
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A splice is definitely the best option, (but then I quite enjoy splicing bits in). :oops:

If it's not rotten too far up you could move the bottom hinge up about six inches.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:46 pm 
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ayjay wrote:
A splice is definitely the best option, (but then I quite enjoy splicing bits in). :oops:

If it's not rotten too far up you could move the bottom hinge up about six inches.


2 hinges at present, top and bottom. I am going to add a third just before the windows which is 2/3 up on the door. I am hoping the bottom hinge and the new hinge will carry most if not all weight of the door. I am going to use wood hardener filler for the top one and that will be more for pivoting rather than weight support. see if it works?! I have done similar on a gate door and worked but less weight.
The top hinge is right at the top, no space to move up. Only rotten by the hinge.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:47 pm 
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It's probably much quicker and cheaper to splice too. But , if you do want to go down the filler route , first cut out any decayed wood , dispense with the wood hardener ,it won't magically make the rotten stuff strong again and if you chop back to something solid then you won't need it. For filler you need something like a two pack , P38 car body filler is the same as a lot of "wood" fillers and generally a bit cheaper too. I'd put some screws into the wood to help "bond" the filler to the wood as well. It will probably take several applications to build up with sanding to suit along the way. If you fit the hinge in the same place I'd also use longer screws to go through the filler into the wood or even straight through the frame and into the brickwork but to be honest I'd follow ayjay's advice and move the hinge higher and combine that with your own thoughts on adding an additional hinge.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:58 pm 
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Just to repeat what the others have said; filler is, at best, cosmetic.
Splice a piece of decent wood in, and you'll have a fix that'll last for years.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:34 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
Just to repeat what the others have said; filler is, at best, cosmetic.
Splice a piece of decent wood in, and you'll have a fix that'll last for years.


Im being tempted to splice by you and others here. What do I use to cut the frame on the wall? Its 3"x4", cant use hand saw or jigsaw... may be multi tool?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:41 pm 
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Whenever I splice I use a couple of handsaws , a good one for most of the cut and an older one if there's a chance of hitting brickwork or a nail. That covers any cuts across the grain and I then use hand chisels . On some work I have used a drill to remove much of the waste but that still requires final cleaning up with a chisel. I've not used a multi tool although splicing large timbers I have used a chainsaw but that's a little OTT for a little door frame.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:42 pm 
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If it's only the top surface which is rotten you don't need to replace the complete stile, you just patch the rotten section.

If a piece of 2 X 1 par is large enough then that's what to use, otherwise select something larger.

Assess where the extent of rot is and a cut a patch large enough to cover it, I prefer to dovetail a patch in.

Cut the patch, place it over the frame and mark around it with a sharp pencil.

Mark the depth to chop out too - (the thickness of the patch).

Now chop it out with a sharp chisel. You don't want the patch to end up flush with the existing surface, leave it a couple of mm proud and plane it down later.

The patch needs to be tight fit - you shouldn't really be able to insert into the cut out by hand but you need to know it will go in - I usually make them very very slightly bevelled so the when the smaller section goes in I know that the fatter part will drive in.

Once it's ready glue it up and drive it with a hammer until the glue is squidging out. Put a screw in to hold it while the glue dries.

Once the glue is dry take out the screw and plane off the excess.

The finished job should look something like the pic below.


Attachments:
Patch modified.jpg
Patch modified.jpg [ 153.96 KiB | Viewed 298 times ]

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