DIY Forum

 

Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:32 pm
Visit Hilti


Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]




 

 


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:07 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:56 pm
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Looking for a little advice..
Chimney stack has been removed to below roof level and the Chimney breast has been removed from ground floor. The rest remains in the attic and first floor.

Structural enginner has said it’s fine to take down without the need to notify BC and BC said they only require notice if this chimney is acting as a buttress to the wall which the SE says it is not.

I am going to do the work myself with no previous building experience.
My plan is to hammer and chisel the bricks away starting at the top and work down layer by layer to the bottom! I have an SDS drill for the more stubborn bits.
For bricks tied in I will use a chisel to split the brick but if they’re too tough I will use an angle grinder to cut them.

Is this the best approach? What about the hearth?
Is there anything else to consider?


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on DeliciousShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:24 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:15 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Leicestershire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 8 times
Hi,
Without seeing the property it's difficult to advice the correct course of action but your method seems sensible, I would use an SDS also, such a good tool! You're method of using an angle grinder to cut the tied-in bricks is a very sensible one, as this will minimise dislodging the bricks that you want to remain. To be absolutely sure, I suggest cutting those bricks first, before knocking out the stack. Don't cut them all in one go though, do it several courses at a time i.e. grind out several course, then knock out those courses and remove, then go onto the next 5 or so courses etc etc. Work from the top down as you suggest. If you grind the lot in one go, the whole stack will effectively be detached from the walls.

I would pose the same method to the SE, as he has seen the property.

Just make sure there are no first floor joists tied into the chimney breast. I'm assuming this isn't the case, given the SE's already given it the go ahead.

Hope that makes sense.
Sam



For this message the author DIYSam has received gratitude : zedox
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:25 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:56 pm
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Thanks DIYSam
Sounds sensible. Neither attic or 1st floor joists are tied into the breast. I'll propose this method to the SE and see what he says!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 12:31 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2017 4:47 pm
Posts: 700
Location: East Riding of Yorkshire
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 182 times
You will probably find that both the floor and ceiling joists are 'trimmed' where the breast passes through the first floor
and ceiling.
Just thought it prudent to mention that these floor areas will require repair.
You may wish to discuss these repairs with your SE.

As regards to the hearth, this area will probably not have a DPC.
If your ground floor is suspended (joists & floor-boards) then this will most likely be trimmed around the hearth area.
If this is the case, the easiest option is to break out the hearth to a nominal depth of say 200mm and fit a DPC followed by 100mm Celotex with 100mm of screed over. Troweled to a finish.
The harder way is to remove all hearth material and supporting brickwork down to foundation level, then repair the timber joist area and floor.
Choice is yours.

Cheers,

Davyp1


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:16 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:15 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Leicestershire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 8 times
I'd 2nd what davyp1 suggests too, that's really good advice!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:59 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:36 am
Posts: 759
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 131 times
to start you dont need a SE any compitent builder knows the score.
is this a gable wall or a party wall becouse if a neighbour has removed all or any part of there chimney breast then butterssing can be an issue.

filling in is all thats needed at each floor trimming joists opening you dont need a SE opinion

removing chimney breasts is a structural alteration and round here that means BCO needs notifying.
what hearth are you talking about,youve already removed the ground floor c/breast.did you not take care of the GF hearth then?

take the bricks down one at a time dont go cutting a number of courses free. that could lead to an accident.just nick the tie-in bricks and one blow and theyl split, use the a/grinder or a chisel.
block the bottom of the flues with bagsto prevent soot blow out.



For this message the author wes56 has received gratitude : zedox
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:33 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:56 pm
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Cheers guys!
The hearth on ground floor was removed when that part of the breast was taken out by the previous owners. I meant the 1st floor hearth!

The neghbour’s chimney breast is intact. Only the stack has been removed.

The joists are indeed trimmed around the breast


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:37 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:56 pm
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 0 times
wes56 wrote:
removing chimney breasts is a structural alteration and round here that means BCO needs notifying.


Here’s exact wording from our BCO when I asked about removal of this chimney
“Chimney - Where the chimney is being removed in the attic, if the chimney above the roof is being retained and supported, we would require an application for this. If the chimney is being removed in its entirety, we would advise that you check that the chimney is not acting as a buttress support to the party wall, if it is not acting as a buttress and is being fully removed, this would not require Building Regulations.”

I don’t want to fall foul of any regulations. I’ll ask them to clarify this!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:45 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:15 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Leicestershire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 8 times
Providing you relayed this information onto the SE and that is what his advice (to not notify BCO) is based on, you're good to crack on.

You were right to check with a SE, better safe than sorry.

If it does make you nervous though, just make sure you keep all correspondence from both the SE and the BCO. Did you get written confirmation from the SE, or was it verbal? Similarly, was the statement from the BCO in writing?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:14 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:56 pm
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Both responses written in email. I’ve asked the BCO to confirm if they do or do not need notice.
Yep. Will definitely be keeping copiea of their responses


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:25 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:15 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Leicestershire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 8 times
Great, good luck with it all. Let us know how u get on.
Sam


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

 

 




Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Solent plastics


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO