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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 9:55 am 
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Hi All,

I wanted to add some preventative measures to avoid ceiling sagging in an old Victorian terrace house bedroom.

Three bedrooms in total, two ceilings sagged a lot and I completely replaced them with plasterboard.

In the third bedroom, the ceiling is not sagging yet, but I want to take some measures to avoid that happening. It has a couple of cracks, bigger than hairline and you can see the plaster is starting to move.

I was thinking to go up to the loft, and add some plasterboard adhesive over the lathe and plaster, so that it grips the old plaster to the lathe, essentially gluing the plaster to the lathe from above.

It's just an idea - not sure if something else would be more suitable, e.g. bonding coat.

Also not sure if that just adds more weight, and is a bad idea?

Has anybody done anything like this before? Or can share some ideas?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:17 am 
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Some pics:ImageImageImage

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 5:34 pm 
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Bump

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:15 pm 
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Not much you can do tbh, the lime plaster is pushed through the lath and mushrooms out, once the bond fails - game over and gravity takes over

Making it wet will make it heavy and possibly cause it to fail



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:22 pm 
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During my time in restoration I've seen it done on old and precious ceilings . Often the laths had been eaten away by worm but the plasterwork was deemed saving.
The process involved screwing wires to the joists in a sort of large flat U shape with the flat sitting against the plaster . Then the area was lightly hoovered to remove any loose debris . Then hessian dippped in plaster of Paris was applied over the lot extending up the sides of the joists. Hope that makes sense.



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:28 pm 
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Thanks fir the info guys. Was the purpose of the u shape wire to 'attach' the plaster to the joists? What was the spacing and what are they called, so I can search for them online?

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:32 pm 
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I'm wondering if I can use chicken wire or similar also...

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:38 pm 
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Purpose was simply extra support as they became bonded between the original plaster and the PofP /hessian mix. This was because as I say it was often done when the laths were rotted away or were very fragile. Spacings were around ten inches or so . They don't as such have a name as they were just non ferrous wire cut to suit. A loop was formed in each end and a screw with a washer passed through into the joist.
Just seen your post about the chicken wire . We also as a matter of course used stainless or brass fixings and I've seen both stainless and copper wires used . I've always assumed that was because off potential rusting taking place.



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:40 pm 
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Thanks, this is super helpful. I will give this a go!! Cheers all. Have a great evening.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:51 pm 
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One thing I will add is the mention of using plaster of Paris . This is also sometimes known as dental plaster or at least is very similar and it goes off very quickly so you will need to work quickly and on a small area at a time. I can always remember the first time the plasterer started the job. He mixed up a bucketful at the bottom of the scafffold , stuck his trowel into it and then climbed up the ladders . By the time he got to the working area it had gone off in the bucket . He was a bit narked but the rest off us had a good laugh.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:09 pm 
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Thanks Grendel. Do you think Plaster of Paris is still best thing to use in this situation, not Bonding coat or plasterboard adhesive for example?

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:19 pm 
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To be honest I never actually questioned why plaster of Paris , I just assumed it was used because it sets quickly rather than having something soggy sitting on the original for a long period of time. That said I can remember that sometimes an additive , casein I think , was added to slow the curing . On that basis I don't see why plasterboard adhesive couldn't be used. Perhaps try a sample area?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:20 pm 
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Thanks - yes, I'll try a sample area and see what works best. Thanks again for your help.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2018 9:50 am 
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plaster of Paris is ultra fine and will bond into the old dry plaster, it does go off quickly - tbh that had slipped my mind it you can put a prop under the area you working till it drys for added support

I know the mess and the amount of work it takes to rip out the lathe and plaster its not great

if its not too bad you could double tack the celling with PB


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:10 am 
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Thanks bob. I was also thinking of mist coating the plaster and lathe from above with PVA, and then applying the Plaster of paris while it was tacky. Good idea or is there an potential issue I'm not thinking of? Maybe I'll try with and without PVA.

Yes - having ripped out the old plaster and lathe ceilings from two other bedrooms, I'm really, really trying to avoid removing the old ceiling from the third bedroom.

Overboarding with plasterboard can work. Its not too bad at the moment, I'm trying to prevent future issues rather than fix an imminent collapse.

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