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 Post subject: Razor buys a Lathe!!!
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:20 pm 
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All together now - If you gonna be dumb you gotta be tough!!!



I thought about this one for a long time and asked myself all the right questions:

Do I really need a lathe?

Is it the best use of the space?

Would I have a clue what to do with it?

Have I got all the other machinery malarkey to make the best use of it?

Would it be sensible to buy one now when I may be moving in the next six months?

The answer to all above was of course a resounding NO and then I remembered I live alone - decision made :mrgreen:

I asked poor Colin many many questions, mostly of the 'is this ebay one ok' and 'Is that ebay one ok'

I thought he would be getting slightly irked with answering although he's far to polite to ever say but then I realised his masterplan wasn't to stop me buying a lathe - he just wanted me to buy a BIG lathe!!

So I started looking here at this kind of tabletop jobby:

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And I ended up buying:

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It's a Henry Milnes 13" lathe with detachable bed section to take the swing up to 20"!!

It's around 6' long and it has LOTS of levers, knobs and twirly things to play with, It's like a giant Fisher Price activity centre for someone that's never gonna grow up!! I got all the metric changewheels and it looks to be in quite good condition - not that I would know unless there was a great big bit broken off somewhere :lol: :lol:

Been hard at work sorting the workshop and almost ready to collect it next weekend but before I can use it I need to decide whether to change it to a 240v motor, probably not because I may well pick up some more 3 phase stuff so it'll be either an inverter or more likely a converter depending what advice I get about it?????

In any case there's no rush to decide. It's a scary beast so I think I will probably wait until after Xmas when I've had a basic lathe and safety lesson from the long suffering Colin and my promotion will kick in and provide the funds to allow me to buy a decent power supply, can't be doing with Mickey Mouse options!!

The manual is still available, I suspect that'll be another £45 out of the bank :roll:

More info on the beast here for the guys on here that are into lathes:

http://www.lathes.co.uk/milnes/

http://www.lathes.co.uk/milnes/page2.html

Lots of questions to follow people :roll: :roll:

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:50 pm 
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Well done Ray, hope you get plenty of use from it.
Listen to Colins advice especially on the safety aspects, they can bite you know.


In the 70's I was a workshop instructor at HMS Collingwood for Naval Artificer Apprentices and taught hand fitting and machine tools.
All CPOs were expected to be able to teach.
We were changing all our imperial lathes about 150 to metric, we had the chance to purchase one for about £20. There were Myford ML7, if I recall, and Harrisons not sure what model.
I lived in a terraced house with only a very small garden and a small cellar with no room for one.
I wish I'd bought one and stored it somewhere ::b ::b ::b

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:02 pm 
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EJJ150847 wrote:
Well done Ray, hope you get plenty of use from it.
Listen to Colins advice especially on the safety aspects, they can bite you know.


In the 70's I was a workshop instructor at HMS Collingwood for Naval Artificer Apprentices and taught hand fitting and machine tools.
All CPOs were expected to be able to teach.
We were changing all our imperial lathes about 150 to metric, we had the chance to purchase one for about £20. There were Myford ML7, if I recall, and Harrisons not sure what model.
I lived in a terraced house with only a very small garden and a small cellar with no room for one.
I wish I'd bought one and stored it somewhere ::b ::b ::b


life is full off regrets like that :roll:
we also have rooms cupboards and attics full off carp that we wanted to give to a good home but never quite made it :huray: :huray:

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:18 pm 
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My Dad was a time served sheet metal worker so some of my earliest memories were the smell of the oil, filings and welding fumes when visiting the factory plus I have a great interest in old machines, aircraft, tanks anything really. This country really did lead the world in the engineering field and the old skills seem to be dying out with the older generation.

It's far to easy with modern life to vegetate every night in front of the telly or PC and I think I've gotten into the habit myself, I'd much rather be learning new skills, with the amount of tutorials on youtube available on any subject you name there's no excuse!

And yes I suspect the safety aspect is going to feature very highly up Colins list. Don't google lathe accidents if you want to sleep tonight!!

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:01 am 
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Awwww man..... talk about green with envy :lol: I'd settle for the desktop jobbie let alone a beast like that.

But in my case I'd have to get the building before I could find space to put something like that to work.... I mean play.

I suppose next years project 'could' be changed from a garden chalet to a massive workshop... I'm sure Jo wouldn't mind :lol:

Anyway Razor, you're in safe hands with Col as your tutor. That alone has got to be worth the purchase.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:17 am 
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I'm sat here all day wondering what the hell I could do with a dirty great lump of metal like that other than get a hernia :lol:

The bad news is sod all unless I make a load of drawing pins to save walking to the shop.

Then I got to thinking would I prefer to play snooker every night or turn into a hermit and hide in the garage annoying the neighbours. :scratch:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 1:46 am 
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Razor wrote:
I asked poor Colin many many questions, mostly of the 'is this ebay one ok' and 'Is that ebay one ok'

I thought he would be getting slightly irked with answering although he's far to polite to ever say but then I realised his masterplan wasn't to stop me buying a lathe - he just wanted me to buy a BIG lathe!!
Get the kettle on. Does the Colonel Reverend (AKA Colin) live near you? He will be there like a shot.



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 11:41 am 
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That's a beauty!
Did you get any tooling, chucks etc with it?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 5:39 pm 
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Hi,

Thanks for the thumbs up guys; I think I might have previously mentioned I like lathes. :huray:

Congratulations Razor; a wonderful new toy to play with and a nice big one at that. One thing with lathes which is always worth considering is that you can't turn big items on a small lathe but you can turn small items on a big lathe.

I would never ever buy another small lathe like the Clarke CL300M I recently sold; these are OK for hobby use but putting on a small cut of only 60 thou blew my Clarke motor and circuit board both expiring in grand fashion in a cloud of expensive smoke; please don't take my word on this just browse the web for the number of Clarke lathe owners who have destroyed the circuit board and at well over £100 each what's the point of installing circuit board after circuit board if the boards are so flimsy.

You've made a top choice Razor I'm proud of you. Your lathe will do anything you ask of it; it's a similar size to the Colchester Triumph I used to own and love. Please please do not buy a Transwave static converter to power it; I had a Transwave and it was this that really decided me to part with not only the Colchester but also my giant Dominion woodturning lathe; the Transwave static converter was woefully underpowered whilst trying to start something with a load on it. I think you'll find a VFD the easiest way to power your lathe from 240V and you will enjoy variable speed etc; I have a 2.2KW VFD powering my fully restored Union Graduate woodturning lathe giving variable speed and forward and reverse; the only problem is these VFD's do not like dust so I mounted my VFD the opposite side of the wall running the cables through adding remote controls.

What size main drive motor has your lathe got Razor; my Colchester had a 3 phase 5hp with 1/2hp suds pump; if my memory is correct the 5hp was a two speed motor and with the lathe running through the Transwave if I put on a decent roughing cut say 1/4" on radius (1/2" on diameter") the Transwave became very audible indeed rattling its head off; it used to drive me mad; yes the Transwave powered the lathe but it was hard work; no offence meant in any way to any Transwave owner I simply disliked mine.

You were never irksome Razor in fact I enjoyed looking at the lathes on eBay as much as you did and I've always got time to do my best in giving information to any would be lathe owner; I really am pleased you stuck out and bought such a nice lathe; if you become fed up with it please throw it my way because I love playing with lathes. Dave54 has brought up a very good point and something I brought to your attention Razor; the more tooling like chucks and face plates that come with a lathe are a real bonus; drill bits; reamers and such as milling cutters all are very useful and can be expensive to buy separately. I visit Rufforth Auto Jumble once a month weather permitting and it's amazing the amount of cheap second hand tooling is available such as an 1/2" reamer for £1; Rufforth is like a candy store to me and I'm attending this Saturday on the look out for bargains.

Safety is indeed paramount; the lathe you have bought Razor is very capable of pulling your arm off if running in low gear and I'm being serious; a big chuck has a lot of mass just like a big flywheel and whilst in motion it should be treated with the utmost of respect also if a big job is being turned exposing the outer ends of the chuck jaws these can inflict a serious injury but as with using any machine under power the biggest safety aid is good common sense; if it feels wrong then it is wrong; rings; jewellery; watches and especially loose clothing are definitely not welcome on a lathe and a lathe really does enjoy long hair. I'll not bang on about safety trying to put anyone off buying a lathe but be aware of the dangers and DO NOT TAKE RISKS.

How very true OchAye; yes I would have been round to Razor's like a shot but unfortunately I live too far away; Bron's already on red alert though for when Razor visits us to service the excellent Intergas boiler he so lovingly installed last January; bacon butties are already top of priorities because we've never seen bacon butties disappear as quickly as the last time Razor visited us. I just hope poor Razor doesn't take another 3" of snow away on his van again.

I'm delighted for you Razor; you've got a lovely lathe and one built to last many lifetimes if looked after. Bron and I are looking forward to seeing you again; pity though you live so far away because I can only skim over lathe work in the short time you will be with us. Before I forget; how many members know a lathe can produce very accurate flat surfaces; a lathes just doesn't turn round items it can produce things like cubes and triangle imagination is the only limit. I'm talking of "fly cutting" and your lathe Razor is well up to doing this and doing it cheaply.

Please don't be afraid of asking me any questions; if I can help I will be happy to. :thumbleft:

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 6:06 pm 
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Quote:
and a lathe really does enjoy long hair.


I'm sayin' nothin' :B

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 6:52 pm 
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Retired wrote:
Thanks for the thumbs up guys; I think I might have previously mentioned I like lathes.
Who? Youuuu?

Nahhh, you never said such a thing :tongue8:



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 9:21 pm 
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I'm envious. :hello2:

We've got a lathe at our place but they don't let me play with it. ::b Although, at Skool, back then I was allowed to use such. Seemingly, the intervening years have changed attitudes. :cb

I had a job recently. A corroded 3/4" steel pipe had broken off into a brass fitting which is no longer obtainable, but which is definitely desirable as part of our 'spares'.

I gave it to our 'lathe man' with the request that, "Either restore it or, bore to a clearance and we can then braze a length of pipe into it."

He 'restored' it. :cheers:


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 9:21 am 
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Hi,

Thanks Grumps; just one example of how useful a lathe can be; I would never be without at least two lathes; one woodworking the other metalworking. In a home workshop lathes aren't generally used every day but when they do get used they pay for themselves. I enjoy using both types of lathe; both require different skills; woodturning is more creative and involves the turner at every stage but a metal lathe once the work is set up then it's a different skill operating all the controls; my Lorch has power feeds so I can select either manual feed or power feed; with power feed engaged I can just let the lathe do the work and be ready to stop it at the end of each pass; skill is needed to turn metal to fine limits but this comes with practice.

I've never operated a CNC (Computer numerical control) lathe and neither have I used a DRO (Digital read out) my turning has always been one offs which I was taught to do as an apprentice using my head and my hands; on the Lorch I do however use a digital vernier caliper but for best accuracy I resort to my micrometers especially whilst turning lands for bearings.

Woodturning is a fascinating hobby practiced by many professional woodturners; my woodturning has mostly been producing furniture parts and I always enjoy sessions at the lathes.

I hope I've made a way through to my Lorch lathe by the time you visit us Razor; the garage is upside down due to me remodelling it; I've just resolved a water ingress problem so can start to plan the remodel; the picture below shows our garage in its untidiest state I've ever seen it in. I've already disposed of my big home made 3 phase dust extractor and this morning my 3 phase transformer is being sold; I did worry about having this huge 3 phase transformer because if anything was to happen to me Bron would have had a nightmare trying to sort it out; in a novices hands it would be deadly so better to let it go now. The transformer must weigh at least 75 kg and with two phases at 415V and the third phase wound at 600V its not something to poke with a finger whilst under power. :cb

It's white over with deep frost this morning and I confess I'm not keen to venture out from our warm bungalow but I'd better brave the cold and go to the garage before another day slips by.

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:39 pm 
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Hi,

Have you got the lathe home safely Razor? :scratch:

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:57 pm 
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My Daughter said yes he has Col. :lol:



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