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 Post subject: Rainwater harvesting?
PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:17 am 
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With this year being fairly dry in the Uk and very hot here in France I wondered why new builds do not have any collection systems for the rainwater, if you are lucky enough to have a new house built, it would make sense to collect the water, I know some systems are available to recycle rainwater for the loo and garden, but just a simple tank for watering the garden would be more than adequate, in our new build all the rainwater would have had to go into five separate soakaways each a M3, so I asked the builder to dig just one big hole and put in two 5000ltr concrete septic tanks, and two pumps, the extra cost was about 1800€, so in 250K built its only a small amount, I have never met anyone yet, either in the Uk or here that collects rainwater this way, anybody here done it? and any problems encountered? Thanks Nos


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 9:30 am 
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A good idea Nos. One point I thought of is during the winter is the usage and storage going to be balanced? It is possible for overflow and with this in mind would it be worth having a run off faculty onto a soakaway in case? You have probably factored this in already. Just as a small further point I was talking to a friend down his allotments and he told me that when we had a short downpour for 20 minutes or so the other day, he was amazed to get 6 gallons off one side of a greenhouse roof.

I hope this helps :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 9:40 am 
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Cost and space. New builds don't often have the space either to install tanks for this size, or a garden big enough to require that much water. It would take an awful long time to recoup the £2000 cost of installation and the ongoing costs of pump running and maintenance.

We have a small garden and only a few certain plants and the greenhouse get watered daily. We manage to collect enough water in run off from the greenhouse plus collecting excess water from the house. Never use a hose.

Total cost for this system, £0 if you get second hand butts, maybe £100 if you buy everything new. We would never need 5000l on hand, 6 months or so of the yer we don't need to water anything, same goes for most parts of the UK I would say.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:10 pm 
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Yes after the tanks are full there is a run off into the ditch at the side of the lane, which is on a fair slope, I know its costly and yes it does depend where you live and if you use a lot of water, but for some people that are lucky enough to have greenfingers its better for all to collect it, rain butts have been around for donkeys years they just need to be bigger, here in France you can get them which fitted into your "fall" pipe and when full, divert it back into the drain, its the Uk that has the water problems, they should have a national water grid, we have rivers and canals to move water and a wet Scotland and north west to collect it, stuff HS2, it should be H2O that the money should be spent on. Nos


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 5:59 pm 
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Nos wrote:
..... its the Uk that has the water problems, they should have a national water grid, we have rivers and canals to move water and a wet Scotland and north west to collect it, stuff HS2, it should be H2O that the money should be spent on.

I seem to recall that after the 1967 drought the government of the day did start doing something about that - they initially combined the river authorities as well as local (private and municipal) reserviors and water companies (at that time all independent bodies) into regional water authorities and also started a number of abstraction and pumping schemes which included the Lune-Wyre scheme in Lancashire and the Ely-Ouse scheme in East Anglia. At the time these were intended to be the first parts of a regional (if not national) water network. Under "milk snatcher" the water authorities were, of course, sold off for a pittance and when in private hands there was absolutely no desire to spend money which could otherwise be used to fund shareholder dividends and directorial bonuses, so since the 1980s these schemes have simply lain dormant - after all why would the French government want to fund a public scheme in the UK rather than take the money and run (the Frogs are heavy investors in the UK privatised water industry)?

Stupidity and shortsightedness in the boardrooms of the water industry seems to be rampant. A typical example of this is Kielder Water in the North East; planned in the 1960 to serve the steel industries of Teesside by the time it opened in 1982 a combination of the decline of traditional heavy industry in the region together with more water-efficient industrial processes and better control of water supply leakage had made it into a white elephant. It was even offered to Yorkshire Water at a knockdown price at one time but rejected - something that YW came to regret in the drought summer of 1995 when they had to resort to road tanker deliveries from Kielder to Scammonden Dam near Halifax (for those who travel the M62 the motorway actually runs on top of the dam which is just after the high bridge when travelling west to east) in order to keep Halifax, Kirklees and Bradford supplied with water. YW have since installed back pumping systems which allows them to abstract from the rivers Aire and Wharf and store the abstracted water in some of the Pennine reservoirs including, I believe, Gorpley Reservoir near Todmorden and the Ripponden Reservoirs above Ripponden. Too little, too late?

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:16 pm 
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Rainwater harvesting porn ,
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... g-now.html


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 12:52 am 
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whilst i fully agree with saving the planet :huray: and i do at every operatunity
1200L is worth perhaps £2.50p round here so unless you have free top ups when needed and no running costs your say £50 storage tank could take maybe 15 years to cover costs

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 7:37 am 
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big-all wrote:
whilst i fully agree with saving the planet :huray: and i do at every operatunity
1200L is worth perhaps £2.50p round here so unless you have free top ups when needed and no running costs your say £50 storage tank could take maybe 15 years to cover costs


Its not about saving costs, its about saving water that has been treated and is fit for us to drink, this costs money, and its been shown a few times it can run out. Why water the garden with drinkable water? admittedly it relatively cheap less than a euro for 1000lts, the French still buy tonnes of bottled water :dunno: when we left the Uk it was becoming very fashionable to buy fancy named bottled water, in our village they started bottling it and now its a big seller. Thanks J&K know the area well and was at Kielder when the dam wall was being finished, the road tankers were all parked up at the side of the "Nont Saras", they tarmacked a whole field for the tankers and then had to dig it all up again! Nos


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 10:53 am 
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to be fair gray water storage would be far more productive and have a chance off keeping up with needs
500l would flush a toilet maybe 100 times or water the garden maybe 10-20 times
in general when you need the water the most the less you will have filling it up
i fully agree about flushing good drinking water down the toilet so dont do it ------------
--------------often :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:16 pm 
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Unfortunately its not recommended to use "Grey" water on lawns or fruit and veg, also if you do use it, for say flowers then it should be used within a day or so, so not good for long term storage, its something to do with all the additives put in to keep everything nice and clean, my roof collection area is 230m2 so just 40mm of rain will fill both tanks up. Nos


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 5:27 pm 
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surely if you control which grey water is collected you can control the unwanted "chemicals" by choosing less poluting products for bathing washing and cleaning :dunno:

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:01 am 
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We don't use grey water as such but we still re-cycle a lot. When we are waiting for the combi to fire up and the water to get hot, we keep a bottle under the tap and collect that, perfectly clean water for the plants. When we wash our hands during the day we again keep a bowl under the tap, yes there is a tiny bit of soap in the water but once mixed with the previously mentioned water it doesn't do the plants any harm.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:27 am 
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Rorschach wrote:
We don't use grey water as such but we still re-cycle a lot. When we are waiting for the combi to fire up and the water to get hot, we keep a bottle under the tap and collect that, perfectly clean water for the plants. When we wash our hands during the day we again keep a bowl under the tap, yes there is a tiny bit of soap in the water but once mixed with the previously mentioned water it doesn't do the plants any harm.

pretty much what i do
all to flush the toilet as i dont have green fingers :lol:

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