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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:37 am 
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I have 7 garage floors to break up and remove and there are potential problems with noise. Can anyone suggest a quiet (ish) breaker to do the job (I expect to be hiring one) and has anyone ever used one of those vacuum waste removal trucks?
Any other help or suggestions would be appreciated too!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:49 am 
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If the floor is of any decent thickness then there is no way the job is going to be done quietly I am afraid.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:29 am 
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Rorschach wrote:
If the floor is of any decent thickness then there is no way the job is going to be done quietly I am afraid.

It is at least 4 and more likely 6 inches, and reinforced I imagine...
The problem is that the architect is trying to keep noise levels down as much as possible in order not to upset neighbours too much - yes, it'll be noisy, but hopefully I can find some way to minimise it..


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:45 am 
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Speed is of the essence.

I suspect the neighbours may be happier with a short period of manic noise than a prolonged period of incessant noise.....

Best thing would be to put out a notice to them all advising of the event, apologising for the inconvenience and disturbance and mentioning and how long it will last..... get onto it asap and kick the sh*t out of it for as short a period as you can.

Also, dynamite works well...... :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 10:18 am 
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As KE says, speed will help, go big and go fast, long low level noise is much worse than loud but fast. Remembering of course if is reinforced then you will need something to cut through the re-bar. It may be best to cut a grid pattern in before breaking it up. You may even find if you do the grid in slightly smaller sections that you will barely need to use a breaker at all.

The best way to keep neighbours happy though is to time the work accordingly. Don't start too early, don't finish too late, don't do it at weekends if possible. Weather helps too but obviously that is more difficult to control. Wet, windy days will significantly reduce the noise transmission and also people are much more likely to have windows and doors closed as well.

Dust is something else to bear in mind, a wet saw will help with dust on the cuts, a hose to mist things before using the breaker will also help.

Sending a notice to neighbours in advance is a polite thing to do, some may choose to go out more on the days you will be working, others may visit their holiday caravan or something. Even if they are staying at home, having knowledge helps.



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:02 pm 
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stevewestern wrote:
and has anyone ever used one of those vacuum waste removal trucks?
Any other help or suggestions would be appreciated too!


I can only agree with what others have said about the breakers. I have been on a site where a truck mounted vacuum was used. They did a good job off removing dust but if noise is an issue you have to remember they are powered by a Diesel engine and again are not the quietest things in the world. I can't remember any sort of specs for it or what size of debris it would shift but I don't think it would pick up big chunks of concrete. On other jobs we have used conveyor belts which will shift rubble as fast as you can shovel it . Again some noise , electric motor , rotating belt and rubble dropping from one to another but efffficient at shifting rubbish.



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:39 am 
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Doing it with a breaker by hand will take days, hire a digger with attachment and get it knocked out in one day, the cost of the hire will be cheaper than the labour for multiple days

Drop letter through the neighbours doors warning them when its going to happen



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 3:26 pm 
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Electric breakers are far quieter than diesel/pneumatic models, but as others have said nothing like this is ever quiet. Accoustic barriers can and do deaden the sound where it is transmitted through air (e.g. where breakers are in use in a courtyard, etc) but they do little to reduce sounds transmitted through the slab itself (an any attached walls). One thing we tried (successfully) on a project where solid bedrock had to be removed in volume and noise was an issue was to core drill the majority of the rock out using a 250mm (static) core drill then break out with a concrete point - surprisingly both faster and quieter than conventional breaking=out although in your case you'd probably also need a large angle grinder to cut-through any rebar. Bear in mind the need for dust suppression when doing jobs such as this together with adequate PPE. Normally water spraying does the trick for the concrete dust and face-fitted P2 masks (minimum) and goggles should be de rigeur

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:30 pm 
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Had quick google and come up with Dexpan chemical breaker and there is a uk supplier

http://www.dexpan.com/dexpan-non-explos ... aking.aspx



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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:30 pm 
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Many thanks for all the replies and advice - I have contacted a demolition company who are going to come and talk through a few possible ideas. They come highly recommended and seem to know about such projects.....
I'll let you all know what happens in a couple of weeks.
Meanwhile, as so often, I am very grateful for all the help.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:44 am 
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Bob225 wrote:
Had quick google and come up with Dexpan chemical breaker and there is a uk supplier

http://www.dexpan.com/dexpan-non-explos ... aking.aspx


It's called DYNACEM here.
http://www.dynacem.pl/uk/

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:19 am 
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I was intrigued as to why the concrete bases have to be broken up Steve? Is there a story?

DWD

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:00 am 
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7 garages on a site - your get a block of 10-15 flats @ £80k-£400k each or 4 2/3 bed houses £200k upwards depending on location

even a clear site with planning will quadruple its value


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:45 pm 
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dewaltdisney wrote:
I was intrigued as to why the concrete bases have to be broken up Steve? Is there a story?

DWD


There is, and its complicated. I'm not sure I should post an explanation on a forum at this stage.

Blimey, that sounds a bit cloak and dagger, but its not really...

The bases need to go as did the back walls of the garages, slowly and quietly. The rest will all go as and when there is agreement between planning and architects, and no-one wants upset neighbours in the meantime...



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