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PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:02 am 
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http://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+woodworkin ... nds+dk1336
37Deg angle

reduced from £80 list seems a bit cheaper than similar elsewhere eg axminster and ebay next cheapest £64 ebay,

however there is a standard angle block plane for £48 on ebay
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brand-New-Lu ... SwNchaLwun


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:30 pm 
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cool, are these any good? make a canny addition like


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:54 pm 
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Detailed review here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZc-z3ovvCk


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:13 pm 
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The low angle is probably a better bet for many people - the standard angle might be a better choice for hardwood.

Are they any good? Yes, I think Qiangsheng planes are way better than any of the cheap brands (Silverline, Rolson, Nielsen, etc) and bethan tter by far a lot of the more respectable brands (Record, Stanley, Faithful, etc), who all seem to be trading on their past reputation these days. The machining is accurate, the finish is pretty good,and you'll need to do a lot less to them out of the box than you'd do with, say, a Record block plane - basically hone the cutter and maybe flatten the back of the cutter as well, do that and a Qaingsheng plane will perform as well as any pre-war Stanley or Record would have. The blades hold a reasonable edge, too, but a word of caution - the cutters are extra thick and they will take longer to regrind if/when you nick one. So are they as good as a Lie-Nielsen, Veritas or Clifton? No, they aren't. They tend to have one or two rough edges and one or two minor niggles (like too much slop in the bench plane adjusters - but no worse than the average 1970s Stanley) - but then they are half the price or less of an equivalent "premium" brand tool. And one big plus over cheaper planes is that the bodies are made from malleable cast iron - so unlike a plain cast-iron plane they won't (potentially) break if you drop one on a concrete floor, which for a tradesman is a real bonus

I admit to being biased as I now have 4 of them: #65 low angle knuckle cap block plane ("Wood River", but made by QS), #5 jack plane, #311 3-in-1 plane (kept in reserve - has been replaced by a Clifton) and a #97 chisel plane

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:28 pm 
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Too much of this "Trading on past reputation" in all types of things.
Often it's just badge engineering.
The Chinese are proving that they're just as capable as anyone else of making a quality product.
Not all tools made here in "the good old days" were good.
Somewhere here I have one of those "Carpentry for the Home Handyman" type books from the Edwardian era IIRC.
It warns about poor quality cheap tools.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 10:26 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
Somewhere here I have one of those "Carpentry for the Home Handyman" type books from the Edwardian era IIRC.
It warns about poor quality cheap tools.

Indeed! I have an eggbeater (hand drill) branded "Toga" which is only just acceptable (and it's still new, in the original box, so it isn't worn out) whereas 197s Stanley eggbeaters were often very, very good drills indeed. It's probably not realised today, but many of the big names had 2nd flight, lower quality, cheaper tool ranges. For Stanley (in the UK) it was (often) "Handyman", sometimes "Acorn" (a Chapman brand originally), Stanley-Bridges (for DIY power tools as opposed to the industrial stuff), etc while even Record had their "Fabrex" brand in the 50s and 60s

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For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : Dave54
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 7:00 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
Dave54 wrote:
Somewhere here I have one of those "Carpentry for the Home Handyman" type books from the Edwardian era IIRC.
It warns about poor quality cheap tools.

Indeed! I have an eggbeater (hand drill) branded "Toga" which is only just acceptable (and it's still new, in the original box, so it isn't worn out) whereas 197s Stanley eggbeaters were often very, very good drills indeed. It's probably not realised today, but many of the big names had 2nd flight, lower quality, cheaper tool ranges. For Stanley (in the UK) it was (often) "Handyman", sometimes "Acorn" (a Chapman brand originally), Stanley-Bridges (for DIY power tools as opposed to the industrial stuff), etc while even Record had their "Fabrex" brand in the 50s and 60s


Toga stuff was usually pretty good though I thought?
Without going and hunting through tools, I'm pretty sure I've got at least one wood chisel, some die stocks, and a pair of "new" (as in unused when I had them), big carpenter's pincers marked with the broad arrow that are "Toga". They've been OK.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:56 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
Toga stuff was usually pretty good though I thought?
Without going and hunting through tools, I'm pretty sure I've got at least one wood chisel, some die stocks, and a pair of "new" (as in unused when I had them), big carpenter's pincers marked with the broad arrow that are "Toga". They've been OK.

Bit variable, I've found. Wasn't Toga a brand name of Bucjk & Hickman? The Toga auger bits (I have a part set of those, not quite as top notch as Gilpin, Bedford, Alfrid, Mawhood. Marples or Ridgway, but definitely better than much modern stuff) and the chisels were indeed good - but then up until the 1960s anything like that (i.e. forged as opposed to cast and machined) coming out of Sheffield or Warrington (remember Puma and David Lawrence?) was probably the best in the world - far better than equivalent German or American stuff of the time. Other stuff like egg beater drills and metallic Bailey planes which required casting and machining were often less good (get hold of a Chapman "Acorn" plane from the 1930s or an earlier Preston metallic plane and you'll see exactly what I mean - odd when you look at the quality of other stuff from those two makers). Where cheaper foreign imports had eroded the market (such as hand drills) it really was a case of caveat emptor.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:13 pm 
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Yes, (and again I'd have to look) I was thinking they're not as "nice" as some of the others. Certainly the pincers are very "blocky", but they were for army use I suppose.
I've got a "Gilpin" Warrington pattern hammer. Bought new in 1985 (IIRC) it was a stall at a big local market. The guy had loads of them. I paid something silly cheap for it. £3?
I expect the factory had not long shut?

TBH it's difficult to find much in the way of "ordinary" hand tools to get that excited about these days. I know there are premium brands like "Clifton" but they're on the expensive side for everyday use. Certainly for site work.

Mind you I feel the same way about cars.


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