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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:25 pm 
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Hi, no idea on damp or how to treat but please see pictures, do you think this is damp, these are internal walls (no cavity) on my 1930's house, painted the walls recently and these patches now show really clear.

Thinking its damp and maybe coming down from chimney breast as walls are internal (living room and bedroom) and back onto old chimney breast.

Any advice or guidance would be really appreciated, thanks.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:42 am 
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Try a moisture meter,or tape some blotting paper over it for 24hrs to see if it absorbs.
If it`s been recently decorated,then paint may have pulled something out of brickwork.
It was the Dutch(they got a major award for it),that found the way to wick moisture away from single-skin and other vulnerable buildings.The inventor of special type of brick,noted that open fireplaces didn`t have damp issues,due to the free circulation of air taking any moisture away.He/they(I can`t remember,it`s on the NET somewhere),designed a brick to be fitted on removal of standards bricks,at set intervals around the outside of buildings.These bricks were open to a degree with a bell-shaped ceramic? dome inside that conveys the moisture away as the air/wind plays across the brickwork.
Make sure that gutters and down-pipes are all clear,not leaking and draining off at the correct drop-off angle.Make sure level of ground is below that of inner floor level and no debris is up against building.I put extra drainage in next to this cottage and on the closed chimneys I fitted breather caps...no rain in,but air can circulate to a degree.
Check state of pointing and any rendering.My cottage has cement rendering,so creates a wicking situation in the brickwork behind it,but it`s South facing,I don`t currently have the time,money or inclination to sort,but I have renovated several old properties to a high standard....but there are folk much more qualified than me on here....


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 3:50 pm 
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Thanks for the advice Chemfree will give that a go


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:20 pm 
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what do you mean "an old chimney breast"?
Is there still a chimney breast or has it been removed?
Is or was the chimney breast in the room with the pic or on the other side of the wall?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:32 pm 
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[quote=O.P. "Chemfree"]

Synopsis: Whilst writing about a special brick that wicked moisture and damp away from walls, wrote: It was the Dutch(they got a major award for it),that found the way to wick moisture away from single-skin walls and other vulnerable buildings.The inventor designed a brick to be fitted at set intervals around the outside of buildings on removal of the standards bricks,.These bricks were open to a degree with a bell-shaped ceramic? dome inside that conveys the moisture away as the air/wind plays across the brickwork.

Reply; This damp-proofing method was initially given favourable publicity. But following further investigation of its success or lack of success and the passage of time - its merits and performance have been totally discredited it. It was no better than a normal air brick, and well and truly overpriced. The warning advice given by experts was a resounding No.


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