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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:00 am 
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Hi Everyone

First time post and first time problem!

We are currently having our back garden redone with new slabs being laid and our builders are about 60% way through the project.

When we went out yesterday to look at the slabs laid yesterday it seems there is a significant gradient towards the house. We do have a drain there which is where the builder said our slabs will be aimed towards which we understand although we are not sure if the gradient is correct.

The main reason for the new patio is our soon to be 3rd old daughter and when putting her toy horse/trike on it currently it rolls towards the house which we do not think is correct??

We understand it does need to be sloped but should it be to this degree?

I will try and upload some pics

Many Thanks

Jamie


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:18 am 
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Pictures!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:08 pm 
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Assuming the brickwork is level, it appears to have at least double the slope that I'd have thought necessary just to create a fall in the right direction. (Just my opinion).

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:50 pm 
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It needs ripping up, theres a good foot fall there.

Those slabs are up against the house, there needs to be an acco drain fitted running into the drain, which needs to be storm waterdrain and not foul.

Ideally it needs to be 150mm down from dpc and sloping away from house, 2inches is enough, then run it into a drainage system.

Does he design ski slopes.



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:01 pm 
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:welcomeuhm:

assuming the wall is level then no it's deffo not right.

You would normally expect a fall of say 1 in 60 or so for a domestic patio, this works out at a 50mm fall over 3 Metres.

As Cotswold says ideally away from the house but if not a french drain should be installed.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:26 pm 
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Jeez, you'd get the bends if you walked up that slope too fast!.. :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:39 pm 
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if you install a french drain where will it discharge to? you have to slope it away from the house. do it proply dont build in trouble. leave the last 600mm near the retaining wall asopen soil for absobtion drainage.
that slope might be dangerous if its icy


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:47 am 
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cotswold builders wrote:
It needs ripping up, theres a good foot fall there.

Those slabs are up against the house, there needs to be an acco drain fitted running into the drain, which needs to be storm waterdrain and not foul.

Ideally it needs to be 150mm down from dpc and sloping away from house, 2inches is enough, then run it into a drainage system.

Does he design ski slopes.
Excellent advice sounds like another cowboy job try using builder from fmb or other bodies

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:25 pm 
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Is the brickwork level, it all looks weird.

If it is, your patio has really gone drunk.

I dare say there is a short cut reason behind the bodge, hope there isnt a body under the high end :shock:

Is the pattern repeat correct?



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:43 pm 
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Notch1 wrote:



I dare say there is a short cut reason behind the bodge, hope there isnt a body under the high end



Exactly, short cut, same as the guys we price against, they don't allow for digging out to correct levels, extra hardcore and skips, instead they fit rail way sleepers and step the patios up.



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 11:18 pm 
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Thanks everyone. We have the builder coming round tomorrow evening for a.chat. We've worked out he's down a 135mm drop over 4.5 metres. We increased our patio size by double by digging some of the garden out and he went over the top of the existing patio then used type 1?? to raise the other half before laying. The wall is level and definitely the patio is way off. Thanks for mentioning the pattern, was so concerned by the gradient but looks like you are right seems to be off also.

We didn't have a french drain by the house prevously but do have a a small one where our kitchen waste etc goes down do we need one or was the patio before also not done correctly?

So annoying to think we've spent so much money to get it done properly and now have the faff to sort it! :salute:

Thanks again Jamie



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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 1:15 pm 
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Here is a link about French drains http://www.pavingexpert.com/drain03.htm#french plus a whole lot of other info on the site to help you make informed decisions.

Good luck
Mike

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:18 pm 
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The last thing you want is a french drain against a house wall, all it's doing is sending more water down around it's foundations. As Cotswold has said above it should be an Aco or Linear type drain http://www.pavingexpert.com/drain06.htm and linked into a suitable soakaway or stormwater drain.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:09 pm 
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:oops: :oops: that is the sort of drain I meant Darren. I've always called them french drains... :shock:

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:19 pm 
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wine~o wrote:
:oops: :oops: that is the sort of drain I meant Darren. I've always called them french drains... :shock:


The simplest French Drain is nowt more than gravel in a groove.

You can fancy them up with perforated pipes etc, but for garden use a simple trench filled with gravel can be quite effective.

I built one in a garden of mine many many moons ago - we'd stripped a flat felt roof which was covered in granite chippings, the chippings were loaded into the back of my mini-van which I then had to drive home with virtually no steering cos all the weight in the back meant the front wheels weren't doing very much.

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